• Sweden edition
 
Fees make competition for students more equal

Fees make competition for students more equal

Published: 19 Feb 2010 14:29 GMT+01:00
Updated: 19 Feb 2010 14:29 GMT+01:00

Today the Swedish government, in a bill to parliament, proposes that students from countries outside the European Union pay tuition fees from the academic year 2011/2012. Until now, Sweden has been one of the few countries in Europe that has not charged any type of fees; all students – regardless of nationality – have been funded by Swedish taxpayers. But now it’s time for Sweden to compete on more equal terms with universities in other countries.

In the last decade, the number of foreign students in Sweden has more than trebled, totalling 36,000 in 2008/2009. And taxes have funded the studies for everyone. By charging fees the government now wants to award some of the money to higher education institutions that show particular excellence. Global competition for talent is increasing sharply and the government wants Swedish universities to compete with universities in other countries on the basis of high quality rather than free education.

For Swedes and EU nationals, Swedish higher education will still be fully tax-funded. Students from countries outside the EU will have to pay the full cost for tuition for studies that begin in the autumn semester of 2011. Higher education institutions will determine the size of fees themselves, based on the principle of full cost coverage. Students who have begun their studies earlier, i.e. before the autumn semester of 2010, will not have to pay fees. Exchange students will not be affected by the introduction of fees.

While implementing tuition fees, the Swedish government also wants to promote the internationalization of higher education. It will therefore continue to support academic mobility between Sweden and other countries by various means, including funding for scholarships. It plans to appropriate 30 million kronor ($4 million) annually to the Swedish Institute for scholarships targeted at highly qualified students from 12 developing countries. And it plans to appropriate an additional 30 million kronor for funding for scholarships for highly qualified students from all countries outside the EU. From 2012 it plans to increase this amount to 60 million kronor annually.

Recently, the Swedish government introduced more liberal labour migration laws, making it much easier to move to Sweden for work – or stay in Sweden and work after studies. Students that have a job when their student permit expires can easily change this into a work permit. Also, there is no set quota for work permits for citizens of each country. Swedish higher education institutions can make use of their ties to Swedish industry in order to attract fee paying students.

PhD students in Sweden are funded very generously and PhD programmes will continue to be free of tuition for all students regardless of nationality. Swedish universities will need to spend more on international marketing to be able to attract students at high levels and advertise their own benefits, something which they have not needed to do much, until now.

Despite the great increase in the number of foreign students in Sweden, the country remains a little-known study destination for the vast majority of internationally mobile students. The Swedish Institute, a public agency assigned with the task of making Sweden more well-known around the world, including promoting Sweden as a study destination, will be given increased resources for the latter purpose.

Sweden is known for its academic excellence, and is home to the Nobel Prize. It has the world’s highest spending on research and development in relation to its GDP, according to OECD statistics. In the 2009 issue of Academic Ranking of World Universities by China’s Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Sweden has four universities in the top 100 giving it one of the highest proportions of top ranked universities, in relation to its GDP and population, in the world.

Acclaimed universities, a climate of innovation and openness, additional excellence funding by the government and liberal labour laws will aid Swedish educational institutions in their endeavour to – now more than ever – attract eager and talented minds on the global education stage.

For more detailed information, see: www.studyinsweden.se

For more information on labour migration to Sweden, see: www.workinginsweden.se

Niklas Tranæus, Manager for Study in Sweden at the Swedish Institute

Paul Rapacioli (paul.rapacioli@thelocal.com)

Your comments about this article

17:25 February 19, 2010 by bocale1
Niklas, you are a funny guy... basically your way of reasoning is that, by introducing the fees, the Swedish schools will be able to attract the best students since they will not be anymore considered only for the fact that they are free but mainly for the quality of their courses. Good. Basically, what happens today is that American/Canadian/UK/Australian universities are preferred even if much more expensive than Swedish ones and, in the future, being both expensive at the same way this balance should change... why? why someone that now decides to spend a fortune to go to US even against a free Sweden alternative should decide to go to Sweden once they will become expensive at the same way? people from poor countries are neither stupid nor masochistic. They understand perfectly that studying in a country where the language spoken is English, where it is much easier to find a job and where salaries are much higher is a better alternative than studying in a country which has several issues in introducing immigrants to the job market, that speaks a language that nobody outside Sweden knows and that rewards the best jobs with ridiculous salaries. Come on, you should better argument your ideas!
17:46 February 19, 2010 by Nora
And add to this list the objection of skillful immigrants by the Swedish law. There is no immigration policy for university students (though a new law introduced a year ago for skill workers with a job offer). basically, it means 2 or 3 years of study in M.Sc or 4-6 years in PhD level and then bye bye. You can not stay (and of course work in the high end of the technology positions). While you can go to Canada and hand in your immigration application as you start your studies and within 3 years you're also welcomed as a resident. This is an investment for most non-EU students.
18:06 February 19, 2010 by ATT
I can't agree more with both bocale1 and Nora. I am PhD student at Chalmers and I can tell you that manager of master programs are nervous like hell. They know that the number of international student will probably fall by 90% which what happened to Denmark when they introduced similar law. Thus, their courses are going to lose money. And eventually, some of the master programs has to shut down. Meaning probably reduction of staff at some point in 5-10 years or at least not much hiring. The negative effect on Swedish universities are obvious.

Having said all of these, the fact that Niklas is much better informed compared to me (a simple PhD student) makes me wonder what is the actual motivation behind this misleading article? Why not mentioning the real reason behind the decision?
21:05 February 19, 2010 by SWOT
While Swedish are discussing their high quality education. As an international student, I am struggling with the low quality education and management from Well known Swedish university. I came to Sweden in fall 2004 to Jönköping. The education was ok, although some of the subjects were worse than a Cyprus college I used to study. Last year I left Jönköping with a lot of frustration because the education was getting worse and worse in last 3 years. When I moved to Göteborg university last year, the situation became even worse than Jönköping. Our programme was almost stoped after 2 month we started the programme.. We had to protest against the university in order to protect our students' right. I annot imagine how Swedish can sell such a kind of education to other countries. Although Swedish spent a lot of money on R&D, they are not good at education. What I could see from Sweden in last 6 years was corruption and bureaucrucy. I do not know if they are going to be changed tomorrow or after 2011. I agree, Swedish are good at research, but they do not want to spend their expensive time on education, especially to international programmes. We are just used for them to get fundings to support their research and their fat institutes.
08:05 February 20, 2010 by Nemesis
This is a good thing.

Universities will have to change in Sverige to compete.

No longer will they be allowed to ignore the fact that most students from other countries, including the EU can not get even a basic cleaning job when here.

Money talks and that bit of racism will find itself exposed by studetns who have paid money, in a very internationally public way. The knock on effect from that will be good for Sverige.
13:46 February 20, 2010 by miau
Ever thought about creating a "level playing field" by abolishing fees for education in other countries?

Education is not a commodity to be bought and sold. It's an axiomatic right.
00:25 February 21, 2010 by gmaddalo
I am a PhD in chemistry and i can tell that at the moment70% at least of the students are foreigners! Bearing in mind that scientific topic are not popular among students and more and more students choose to study humanity sciences, this action will certainly cause a drop of income in scientific depts (each dept gains money from the university according to the numb of students), soon many depts will be forced to shut down and soon or later the research will move away as well. the reservoir of the research is the education, no students, no less visibility, more difficulty in enrolling researchers!
11:05 February 21, 2010 by andttrip
I support the proposal, although I am a non-EU student. Swedish universities should attract gifted students by scholarship system other than means of free education. Anyone can not find a job upon graduation, please do not blame for Sweden, because you have not equipped essential skills to secure a job. It is not the fault of Sweden. If you choose to study in English-speaking country, the difficulties to find a job can be even worse than in Sweden. Please bear in mind, after Sweden introduce tuition fees, the study cost is still much lower than in the UK and US. Secondly, comparision to living expenses to UK and US, Sweden is not an expensive country to live in. Sweden is a ideal and attractive country to study even the government introduce the tuition fee.
15:55 February 21, 2010 by Aureliano Buendia
this country and this government needs only uneducated "black workers" to deliver their newspapers and clean their roads... Educated, talented young students are threat to swedish young people... that is why swedes always "get" higher grades at universities than foreigners... institutional racism
18:00 February 21, 2010 by G Kin
@andttrip

Do you have any experience as an international student in Sweden?.

The problem is not that the idea of tuition fees is wrong. And that wouldn't be up to us foreigners to decide any way.

The proble is the effect it is going to have especially in the science and technology deciplines. Some programmes will not have enough students and there for they can not be run, especially in small universities. People will have to leave the university environment to look for jobs in the industry and that is not good for sweden's industrial future. The benefit is small compared to what it is likely to have as gain.

Do you get the point now?.

That is why many people in industry aren't in support of it.
18:41 February 21, 2010 by mikmak
@G Kin Why will it be bad for the industrial future if more researchers move into industry?
19:34 February 21, 2010 by grantike
funny enough am a student and my program runs until 2012.am still here to see how the tuition fee will help the education.currently in my program are mainly foreign student.i do not see how it will help.its only a way of stopping trooping foreigners mainly African students without breaking any country ties or relationship.what a political move i do hope those politicians either succeed or fail with this pursuit.one thing has to happen.am not trying to be a sadist or ingrate.let see
02:24 February 22, 2010 by albert1974
"PhD students in Sweden are funded very generously and PhD programmes will continue to be free of tuition for all students regardless of nationality."

This sounds just funny. The author of this article probably did not read the recent debate about foreign PhD students in Sweden and how they are (mis)treated.

Full tuition will not select "best" students, but richer ones; whatever else do you expect from a monarchy? :-)

And finally this article lacks of any element of journalism: it is just the translation of a propaganda pamphlet of the Swedish Ministry of Education!
11:47 February 22, 2010 by G Kin
@mikmak

You can't see the need to have many people both in industry and the university environment?.

If many move to industry as many programmes in small universities shot down, it isn,t helping in reaching and preparing as many young scientists and engineers as possible.

There was an article on this issue on the news paper Nyteknik a couple of weeks back. You can check on their web page if you read swedish.
12:45 February 22, 2010 by soultraveler3
@andttrip

Do you know anything about Sweden? Have you ever lived here or known anyone that has? Your statement about how people can't get jobs due to lack of skills in Sweden is just plain dumb.

Alot of the foriegn students have more degrees, better grades and better english tha the swedish ones. Most of them after their time in school can also speak swedish almost fluently, albeit, with an accent.

There are so many people looking for jobs right now, swedish and non-swedish. I applied for a job just a while ago and there were over 100 applicants, that happens all the time here. There just isn't enough jobs for everyone who wants them.

It's not something that swedish people like to talk about but there is some discrimination against non-swedes here, especially non-white ones. I think the younger generation is better about it but unfortunately, they're usually not the ones in hiring postions.

100+ applicants + a non-swedish last name= much harder time getting a job
17:24 February 22, 2010 by A Qayyum
Dear Niklas Tranæus!

You will ruin the Swedish educational Institutions because the International students come to study in Sweden because of free education. If you implemented tuition fees, more than 40% Swedish Educational Institutions will be closed. Moreover, Swedish Housing Industry will have to loose its business. Many super markets are feared to be closed because all the students purchase food stuff from Sweden. Sweden will face a severe decline in young and cheap labor. Swedish students will lose their competitors and their standards of education will face free fall.

Very few international students find jobs in sweden during their studies but they all invest huge amount of foreign exchange in living and eating here in Sweden. All this will be gone after implementing tution fees. It is in the interest of Swedish Institions, Students, Employers, Housing and Food Industry that tution fees must not be implemented.
20:04 February 22, 2010 by algo_man
hejdå sverige :)
20:29 February 22, 2010 by Malmoman
@Aureliano Buendia

I Just took an exam that was administered to both Swedish and non-Swedish students. It was in a subject where the answer is right or wrong (mathematics). It was graded by a professor who was not a native Swede. The Swedes handily beat the non-Swedes (including the Chinese students). There was no way of that any discrimination could have taken place.

I did not do well. Instead of sour grapes I opened my books and plan on kicking a$$ on the next exam. I have found that most of the people who cry "discrimination" here in Sweden are way of base. Work harder next time. Stop blaming the Swedes for your failures. Work harder next time.
20:53 February 22, 2010 by mikmak
@A Qayyum

While there are many good arguments both for and against fees, the food industry one is the strangest I've heard :)

Try dividing 36000 by 9 million and see the terrible effects on shopkeepers as they loose 0.4% of their customer base (ditto the housing industry) ;)
09:47 February 23, 2010 by skatty
@bocale1

What you say is very correct and well described, and exactly for the same reasons Sweden should get fee from international students and stop free education.

As a matter of fact there is nearly always a kind of bribery to motivate people to come to Sweden! In the case of immigration and refugee, the promise of a generous welfare motivated many to come here; in the case of University and high education the free programs motivate many to apply for studying in here; in the case of job market for foreign professional, the promise of a dynamic competitive market misguide technicians.

By this kind of policy the country is running its economy, with the promises of we are going to give you this one or that one! Now, Sweden is in a hard stage of selling promises, it can't fulfill its promises and many have realized it.
10:04 February 23, 2010 by Twiceshy
Has anyone done the calculations to compare the total price of studying in Sweden vs other countries? I mean *total* price, including living expenses and tuition. Sweden is an expensive country to live in, so I wouldn't be surprised if it was one of the most expensive to study in after these fees are introduced.

If that's the case then one has to ask why would someone choose Sweden over equal or lower priced alternatives? Certainly not because of the weather or career prospects due to reasons already discussed in other comments.
10:47 February 23, 2010 by anidia
I guess after introduction year, probablly neighbor Norway and Finland get more students and would more competitive than Sweden in long-term.

I understand that their tution fee introduction to cover the relative education budget deficit to subsidize for non-EU students. But as they know this will dramatically shorten the international studnets, they would have prepared for scholarship as included in the bill.

We will see in next years, what Swedish government, institution, media react in the changes after. It wiil be very interesting to see. In 2011 probably say 'non-EU studenst applicaion rate drop more than 90%.'
18:42 February 23, 2010 by mikmak
@anidia

Yes a 90% drop is pretty realistic, that would still be about 12000 applicants. (Last year 114 900 people applied, however only 15%, about 18000 were accepted)
19:45 February 23, 2010 by grantike
@Malmoman

i have a course right now running no single swedish is doing it right now.i do wish you will come join me and my colliques.bring whoever you want and lets try how good you are.in trems of hands down or what.people are gifted with different quality and intellituals.alot of people do not have same understanding
23:18 February 23, 2010 by Ranj
I have taken many courses with foreign students during my studies at Chalmers and Karolinska, and have been following the debate about whether the Swedish government should impose tuition fees on foreign students for a long time.

First of all, I must say I have never felt any difference between Swedish and foreign students apart from the ''home factor'' (e.g. at Chalmers the Swedish students often come from the bachelor's programs at the university and have learnt the ''Chalmers system'' such as dealing with frequently used softwares e.tc.). I did, however, feel a significant difference between the quality of education at high school and Chalmers. The quality of the lectures were still very high, although, the low amount of hours per week and the low teacher to student ratio was striking. I often wondered why Swedish students that had top grades in high school were failing so many courses when I did my bachelor's and by the time I started my master's I got used to the high failure rate, and I do think most differences between Swedish and foreign students was due to the ''home factor''. In essence, I think the problem is not only the quality of the students, but mainly the poor teaching resources. It is true that Swedish universities admit many new students, but when I compare to academic environments that I have experienced abroad, the pressure on the students in Sweden is much lower (i.e. the faculty does not have time to care about each individual student as much as they should...although, my experience at Karolinska was very different from Chalmers).

So, if the Swedish universities want their future students to be independent enough to be compatible with their ''free education system'', maybe they should start considering admission tests or interviews instead of taking tuition fees! I think this would save both lecturers and students from a lot of frustration...and maybe people will start respecting the Swedish education system more!
11:01 February 24, 2010 by Kaethar
Lol at all those stating people wouldn't choose Sweden if they had to pay when they could pick the UK or Canada instead. Well that's a good thing. With the introduction of fees you get rid of the applicants studying in Sweden simply because it's free (and when the education is done they'll bugger off to another country and that will be a lost investment). This way we get students who actually want to study in SWEDEN. And trust me, there are plenty of foreigners (over 7 million in fact) around the world who would choose to live in Sweden as their first choice. THESE are the people we want, not the freeloaders. :)
11:56 February 24, 2010 by asteriks
1)Government has money for war but "has no money for university". dethrone such government.

2)Government has no solution for solving of financial crisis, so they should leave their privileges jobs.

2)Government want only riches to study and it is just question of time when they will make fees even for Swedish.

If they want only riches to study, it is like in the middle age. now they don't want poor educated people who can be rebellious, they believe that children of riches will not make revolution against their own families. therefore they keep poor to stay poor, and those poor who get help money for studying they will surely not lead people against governments. that's trend everywhere and Swedish government will copy such trend.
16:32 February 24, 2010 by skatty
@asteriks

You got some interesting points in here, it might be true that a fee for Swedish might be practiced in future, and the disability of poor to go to University.

As a matter of fact, I can say probably Sweden has one of the highest rates of academic educated poor people at present. I can say from a theoretical point of view, the education itself is good and praised, but in the reality of market economy an education, which can be used in productivity because, all educations cost money. There are thousands of very good educated immigrants and refugees in Sweden, who are living on unskilled jobs, which don't need their education level. These people become poorer than they who didn't get that expensive education and earn the same money, because many of the high-educated guys with unskilled jobs are forced to pay back their students loan!

What we get are poor high-educated people! So, it doesn't mean if there is free education system, then you good result; unless there would be a reasonable balance and thoughtful solutions between the education and labor market!
19:50 February 24, 2010 by kenny8076
i have only two problems with the details of the new fees. the prices......... the last article stated anywhere from 70 to 80,000SEK per year, and that it only applies to non EU students. So they mean Americans and Canadiens......... and maybe some Asians will pay. Don't see a bunch of South americans, Africans or middle easterners racing to Sweden for an education. And Americans WILL NOT go all the way to Sweden for a 12,000USD (not including housing and expenses) mediocre education at best. the difference between the two is that when international students go to the states they are able to find simple work to take care of everyday expenses. To come here for school now you will need 100,000SEK to cover your bachelors, because we are all aware you WILL NOT get a job. this is a typical profit game played by high rollers. like most things in the news here, there backing of the proposal is ass backwards and lies.
03:36 February 25, 2010 by Davey-jo
@ asteriks

As I understand it there are no fees for Swedish students so how does this affect poor Swedes? Poor foreign students will always be discriminated against because they represent a capital loss. At least superficially, really they are an investment in future "goodwill" but that is not accountable. So they have to pay top whack, nothing new and unavoidable in the current capital driven situation.
05:15 February 25, 2010 by jazzIIIlove
>>But now it's time for Sweden to compete on more equal terms with universities in >>other countries.

So, for the past years, simply there was an inequality. If I were a swedish citizen, I would sue the government since taxpayers have been deceived for ages.

By the way, any chance of reduction for EU candidates?

After all my country is a candidate of EU for ages, maybe Sweden halves the tuition for an EU candidate citizen.

lol.
10:49 February 25, 2010 by Raady
NIklas, I am a student in a master program at Blekinge Tekniska Högskolan, Karlskrona. In my academis I studied along with 200 students approximately and its not a small number in case of my Swedish University, and I had never seen a Swedish or people from EU since 2007 expect the professors who taugh my courses.

When tution fees is introduced, to my knowledge and with whom I spoke, 95% percent of them are not interested to apply here either. It means that 5% people should go from studies in department, and if this happens department should shut down lagging with funds.

In the situation when studies are free , student from Europe doesnot insist to come to universities like those I studied how could one from non-EU come to study there?

Propabaly, students in universities like KTH, Chalmers, Linköping, Lund and probabily Stockholm University will continue with there courses and remaining all universities will come to closure lagging with students.

How could you support your article if it literally closes down the number of univeristies ?

As a international student , you said we are not paying taxes, but on every item we purchase we some how pay taxes to the government. We give revenue to government in way of rent, travel, grossaries, and many more than what does go in reality and couldn't be seen.
04:45 February 26, 2010 by jazzIIIlove
@Raady

well said.
12:54 February 26, 2010 by cihan.keskin
I really agree Raady. I can't say it better than he does. There is just one thing I want to add. Even some departments in Lund will shot down. Currently we are 13 people in my masters program and I am the only one who is an EU citizen in the program. I think from 2011 this program might also shot down due to loss of students.
14:24 February 26, 2010 by RadioBob
@Raady

Excellent set of comments.

High cost of living

Unfriendly employment practices

Lagom education

Student visa rules designed to promptly eject recent grads

Crappy weather

+ High tuition cost

=> Sweden has just priced themselves right out of the higher education market by grossly overestimating the value they provide. There are so many other choices out there.
17:31 February 26, 2010 by mikmak
@RadioBob

Then it's excellent that the Swedish eduction system is being shut down right? I mean there's nothing of value really...wonder why people went there in the first place, I mean if you just want a piece of paper you can buy a degree in a few minutes, you would still have learnt as much as in a Swedish education by doing that.
19:54 February 26, 2010 by Niklas Tranaeus
Thanks for all the feedback. The Swedish Institute does not make policy. What I have done is to explain the motivations for the government's proposal and the contents of the proposal as well as high light some factors which makes Sweden attractive as a study destination. Let us be clear about something: there is no hidden agenda. The government definitely means what it says about making Swedish higher education more globally competitive. Higher education institutions will have to work harder to recruit and retain international students. Swedish institutions are realistic about the short term effect: there will be a drop in the number of students from countries outside the EU. In other countries that have introduced fees for international students, the number has fallen initially and then picked up after some years. The speed and extent of this has depended on a number of different factors.

A key issue which many of you comment on is access to the Swedish labor market. We are well aware of that this is something which will need to be improved. Many potential employers in Sweden are not aware of the new rules. Universities will need to work more closely with companies to create more links. But by the time the first students which will pay fees graduate, the situation on the job market will have changed, partly because most of the large 40s generation will have gone into retirement. As for doctoral studies, tuition fees are not on the agenda. And Sweden will continue to have one of the most generous funding systems in the world.
10:21 February 27, 2010 by skatty
By the comment of Mr. Tranaeus, I can just assume that selling promises by Sweden is still active!
11:34 February 27, 2010 by jshalco
Hello everyone. I wanted to make a few points as well.

I'm an American and my master's education here in Sweden is costing me 6 figures for two years. Why? I gave up a full-time job, moved to Sweden, pay rent, buy food, furniture, transportation, books, etc. Why am I spending/not earning over $100,000 to go to a school in Sweden? Well, the past two months should illustrate that it isn't for the weather. I'm here to interact with students from all over the globe. My program is 90% foreign and only 10% swedish. That's why.

There is this great misunderstanding about the US. Yes, Law School, Medical School, Business School and a few other programs will charge you money to attend. Most US graduate students are PAID to attend graduate school.

So, some how American universities..unlike Swedish Universities, are able to pay their graduate students, have the most current computers and technology, have libraries that are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, affordable student housing, affordable food, work opportunities.... How is Sweden going to compete with this by charging me $12,000 USD a year but still have a (bleeping) library that is only open from 10am until 2pm on Fridays and is closed on the weekends? With computers in the lab that are 5 years old? No scanners, no imaging equipment, no editing equipment of any kind... etc.

Give me a break.

Sweden wants to attract the best and brightest? Start by asking the best and brightest what would attract them. This ain't it.

PS. Everyone is talking as if this legislation has passed. Has it passed? Or has it only been introduced?
05:49 February 28, 2010 by swede7814
when I studied abroad in Sweden through my undergraduate university in Minnesota, I had to pay fees to my university so that a Swedish student would not have to pay tuition fees while studying at my university!!! Crazy I know!!! It was not as expensive as a normal semester, but cost of living, trips to the Systembolaget and traveling definitely added up!

I was thinking about moving back to go to Graduate school in Lund, but after comparing programs, Sweden is not as competitive already. My experience studying in Sweden... was so easy compared to my classes in the US. I really do not understand the reasoning of adding fees.
08:03 February 28, 2010 by Zonob
I'm from Canada. I came to Sweden in 2007 to do a Masters at Uppsala University and left in 2008 after completing it. I personally doubt very much that introducing fees will affect Swedish universities, especially good ones, like Uppsala and Lund, that much. Most of you forget or perhaps don't know that the influx of international students increased substantially ONLY after the introduction of Belogna system. With the implementation of the Bologna system, more and more programs, mostly Masters in English, were created and MOST of us came during that recent period. Are you telling me that there were no students in Sweden before that, (e.g. before the last 10 years or so). Back then, most degree programmers were taught in Swedish. My program, for example, was being offered in Swedish until 2007 when they switched to English. The number of students will definitely decrease but it's a HUGE exaggeration to claim that higher education in Sweden will collapse because of it. Even more ridiculous is the suggestion, made by many posts here, that this move will affect the economy much because of the anticipated losses due to reduction in food sales, etc. COME ON guys. The article clearly states that the TOTAL number of foreign students in Sweden is about 36,000. So even if they ALL leave it's very unlikely that it will make that difference on the economy of the country like Sweden. This is not a banana republic! There will continue to be higher education in this country just as there is STILL one in Denmark, 4 years after they introduced fees.
10:52 February 28, 2010 by skatty
@Zonob

In answer to one of your questions; I can say there were international students but not like the most famous countries in Europe, maybe just in some famous programs, with some few people.

First, the main three languages in Europe are English, French and German, which English is the most practical one, seldom anybody learns Swedish outside of Sweden! Second, Internationalization in the sense that we can find in UK or France could not rooted in Sweden, and is still not even near it! The country has been so homogenous that Swedes prefer anybody else become like them; they just try to copy/paste immigrants/refugees here and there! Third, higher education never collapses in Sweden with or without international programs, but labor market continually collapse in Sweden with or without international program, the Swedish authorities have guaranteed it!!!
16:04 February 28, 2010 by A. Vladimir Conde
I am Phd student from latin-america. In my experience some governments inplement some ways of privatization of public services (fees is a way of privatization) under the arguemnte of improvement and better quality. I am very surprised that in Sweden the same policie is being applied. If there is a concen about academic quality, there are MANY other ways to improve it. What about "study in equal terms"....there won´t be equal terms anymore. with or without fees the problem about the academic quality will remain, or could be even worst!!!!
20:08 April 12, 2011 by Elina Smith
Here I tried to explain some of the Sweden's efforts to compensate high tuition fees and arrange scholarships for the students:

http://www.goforstudy.com/swedens-efforts-to-compensate-high-tuition-fees.html

Hopefully scholarships be helpful to convince students to study in Sweden.
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Astronaut helps launch first student satellite
Christer Fuglesang on a previous space mission. Photo: TT

Astronaut helps launch first student satellite

Sweden's debut astronaut Christer Fuglesang is helping students at KTH Royal Institute of Technology to become the first in the country to make their own satellite and send it into space. READ  

Weather
Sweden braces for ten centimetres of snow
Kiruna, in far northern Sweden, has already been hit by snow this season. Photo: TT

Sweden braces for ten centimetres of snow

Sweden's weather agency has warned that up to ten centimetres of snow are on the way for Sweden. READ  

Business and Money
Global profit boost for Handelsbanken
Handelsbanken is Sweden's second largest bank. Photo: Bertil Eriksson/TT

Global profit boost for Handelsbanken

Sweden's second-largest bank, Handelsbanken, has reported a rise in third-quarter profits, boosted by higher income from its loan book as it continues its expansion overseas. READ  

Stockholm 'sub hunt'
Sweden pulls back 'submarine' search
Navy vessels remain in the archipelago. Photo: Lars Pehrson/TT

Sweden pulls back 'submarine' search

Sweden is pulling back part of the naval operation which has been searching for a suspected Russian submarine off the coast of Stockholm for nearly a week. READ  

Julian Assange
Assange prepares for court ruling in Sweden
Julian Assange at Ecuador's embassy in the UK. Photo: Anthony Devlin

Assange prepares for court ruling in Sweden

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says he is "confident" his asylum status will be resolved, as he awaits an imminent ruling on his case by a Swedish court. READ  

Opinion
'Why were we kept in the dark for years?'
The submarine hunt is now in it's sixth day. Photo: TT

'Why were we kept in the dark for years?'

Military expert Johanne Hildebrandt tells The Local that the biggest question in the Stockholm submarine hunt hasn't been answered yet - why don't we know more about the "other operations" from the last few years? READ  

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"?Denna? or ?den hr?? Swedish language students often ask question about different pronouns. One pronoun that especially..." READ »

 

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