• Sweden edition
 

Parents hit back over child abuse suspicions

Published: 04 Sep 2011 09:35 GMT+02:00
Updated: 04 Sep 2011 09:35 GMT+02:00

The parents are now reporting the incident to the Ombudsman for Justice (Justitieombudsmannen - JO), wrote the local newspaper Dalarnas Tidningar.

Social services in Ludvika suspected the girl's frequent bruises were a sure sign of abuse.

The parents were initially suspected of child abuse, but the prosecutor dropped the case.

"We haven't received any apology," said the girl's father to Dalarnas Tidningar, adding that waiting for suspicions against him and his wife to be cleared was a 'terrible time'.

According to the father, the child's bruises are caused by a hereditary disease. He wants JO to investigate the social authorities, and the circumstances which led to the girl being picked up by policemen at her pre-school.

"I'm doing this mostly to highlight the way we were innocently exposed, and to avoid this happening to others," said the man to the newspaper.

He reports feeling frustration that he wasn't believed about the girl's disease causing the bruising.

However, Ann-Sofie Andersson, in charge of the child and youth department at Ludvika municipality, points out to Dalarnas Tidningar that staff have a responsibility to report suspected child abuse to the police immediately.

"But we often try to get help from a teacher or some other employee who knows the child if it occurs during school hours," she said.

TT/Clara Guibourg (news@thelocal.se)

Your comments about this article

10:10 September 4, 2011 by Pont-y-garreg
I think you mean medical "examination".

An "exam" is a test you do at school.
10:45 September 4, 2011 by J. L. Belmar
It does not matter how you call it. What was done proves that we are in a totalitarian country.

The parents should legally acuse the police for such an action. Ann-Sofie Andersson, should go to sell peanuts in a movie house with the hope that she doesn't mixed them up.

There are many diseases than can provoke bruises. I am an adult who takes medicine for keeping my blood thinner and if I hit myself against something, I will have a beautiful purple colour. Of course it is not the same, but the fact that there are diseases that can provoke bruises, is a fact.

The Social services in Ludvika and the school should be fully aware of this, but that is too much to ask in this country were everybody is guilty as charged.
12:11 September 4, 2011 by Abe L
@Pont, the downside in Sweden is that you can't sue the hell out of the government afterwards for something like this.

This is essentially kidnapping, if there was a legit reason to suspect abuse, just bruises really isn't enough, they could have done the exam with the parents consent. If they would have refused the exam it would clearly not work on their behalf and a court-order could have enforced it. But the first step can never be behind the parent's back.
13:20 September 4, 2011 by J. L. Belmar
@ Abe L

"But the first step can never be behind the parent's back."

You are naive. This is what always happens in the land of Kafka. Where do you live?
15:12 September 4, 2011 by J Jack
I was interviewed by social services thanks to some mentally inflexible stick in the mud pre-school teacher who thought our kids were stressed out .. never mind the years of relocations that preceeded our eventual move here. Tri-lingual kids who expect more from a pre-school than just to play all day long :- / xcuze da typos.
22:57 September 4, 2011 by prince T
The law permits them to do it. It is harsh but the motives is to nick abuse in the bud. Teachers are also duty bound to report marks on children. i have friend dat have been investigated b4. This parent cannot win this case
23:16 September 4, 2011 by MichaelM
In general I am on the side of the civil authorities. There were bruises, they were under obligation to investigate.
23:34 September 4, 2011 by Addendum
Another arm of Sweden's Medical Dictatorship. It is a totalitarian nightmare state.

Google Domenic Johansson...
23:39 September 4, 2011 by shiraz
This fellow should be glad that he lives in a state where the state takes welfare of the child seriously and views the child as part of the common wealth. Instead he is demanding an apology from a state that is looking after her human resources ? He doesn't deserve to live in Sweden or have children in the first place. This is probably motivated by some internal guilt of this parent (probably the mother since she is the one who is likely using the father as a tool to wage pre emptive war against the state by provoking him into filing this complaint). They HAVE done something to the child which medical science cannot pinpoint or prove / disprove.
23:44 September 4, 2011 by glamelixir
People, what if the kid was abused indeed? This would have been a good move. This seems to not have been the case, but it is worth it if they will save one kid from abuse.

I can't believe how narrow minded some people become in their will to pick on every single thing about Sweden.

It's tiresome. I wonder what are some of you doing in this country actually, and if you ever plan to integrate at all...
02:02 September 5, 2011 by Tysknaden
I have not seen this child's bruises. Maybe they looked shocking.

Sometimes children have to be protected by the authorities, because their parents are sick and dangerous. Better to make sure a child is not misused, anyways. Every single dead or crippled child is one victim too much.

In Germany it happened again and again otherwise: the authorities did not control every suspicious case. This did result in children tortured to death by their own parents. Most cases in the eastern Part of Germany, the former realsocialist Paradise. (For the SD fans: white skin, Christian or Atheist.)
08:41 September 5, 2011 by nuke
It is good that carers and teachers are keeping an eye on things, but then again ALL ADULTS should be doing this in regard to their own and other people's children, because there are real dangers out there. If we don't watch out for one another, then what kind of society do we live in?

However, to just pick up a child and perform an examination them in this manner is incredibly inconsiderate. It reflects sadly the way the Swedish State views parents with contempt, an attitude that has its roots in the ideas developed by Gunnar and Alva Myrdahl, which include among others the 'observation' that families are inherently dangerous for children, and that children will fare better in the care of State trained experts. All of this can be easily checked out.

So, parents are not informed or even involved in this kind of situation, because they are 'just the parents'. I.e. 2nd or 3rd rate citizens. Because the State considers itself to be the real 'parent', it exercises it right - as any parent - to intervene directly, without telling secondary carers (the real parents). Get it?

It is sad that no one has so far commented about HOW THE CHILD felt about being whisked away by some uniformed strangers, and then examined, probably after being asked to remove some or all of her clothes. I have a daughter who just finished dagis and I know she would have freaked out if she had been picked up by strangers. She has a HEALTHY aversion to strangers (read about attachment theory).
09:21 September 5, 2011 by d'Artagnan
02:02 September 5, 2011 by Tysknaden

"I have not seen this child's bruises. Maybe they looked shocking."

Riposte

As monsieur Belmar wrote in # 2 "There are many diseases than can provoke bruises"... "the fact that there are diseases that can provoke bruises, is a fact."

Have they sent the girl to a medical examination? Have they read her medical background?

I do not know, but I have read many stories about the way the police and the social authorities behave in Sweden. They can accuse a father of sexual harassment without having any proves on that.
10:03 September 5, 2011 by J. L. Belmar
@d'artagnan # 13

"Mercy" for reminding Tysknaden and others what I wrote about the fact of diseases than can provoke bruises in children. So, in order to open the eyes of those who are still wondering about the culpability of the parents, here I go:

"Bruises are hardly unusual in children as they tend to fall down, run into each other and bump the furniture regularly. But bruising that occurs spontaneously or that seems out of proportion to an injury needs investigation. Many diseases can cause easy bruising in children; some are temporary and not serious, while others need ongoing medical treatment. Blood tests can help identify diseases that cause easy bruising in children.

Hemophilia

"There are two types of hemophilia, an inherited clotting disorder. Nearly all of the 400 children born with hemophilia each year in the United States are boys. Nine out of 10 have hemophilia A rather than B. Proteins called clotting factor that help the blood clot are absent in children with hemophilia; in hemophilia A, factor VIII is missing, and in hemophilia B, factor IX is the absent protein.

Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia (ITP)

"ITP in children usually occurs between the ages of 2 and 4, and as the name suggests, the cause is idiopathic, or unknown. ITP occurs when platelet levels are lower than normal, so bruising with minimal or no injury occurs. Platelets stick together at the site of an injury to stop bleeding. In addition to bruising, ITP causes small pinpoint red dots on the skin called petechiae. Petechiae occur when very small blood vessels called capillaries bleed under the skin. In 80 percent of children, ITP lasts six months or less and

Leukemia

"Leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer, according to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. It affects the production of blood cells in the bone marrow. Immature cells grow out of control, crowding out normal production of white and red blood cells and platelets. Leukemia normally occurs in children between 2 and 6 years old.

Von Willebrand Disease

Von Willebrand disease is the most common inherited bleeding disorder, Medline Plus, a website of the National Institutes of Health, reports. Von Willebrand factor helps platelets clump together and stop bleeding. This disease is usually mild, affects males and females equally, and is more common in Caucasians than blacks."

The above is only a tiny part of a study made by Suzanne Robin, a registered nurse with more than 25 years of experience in oncology, labor/delivery, neonatal intensive care, infertility and ophthalmology. Robin received her R.N. degree from Western Oklahoma State College. She has co-authored and edited several books for the Wiley "Dummies" series.

If you want to read more about the subject, just go to

www.livestrong.com/article/105204-diseases-cause-easy-bruising-children/#ixzz1X3w9j0um

So, stop judging the parents harassed by the Swedish social authorities and by the police.
10:19 September 5, 2011 by JustG
Seems to me that if the child's bruises were that bad, the parents and teachers should already have been in communication about them and the teachers would have known about the hereditary disease. I'm not blaming the parents, but they could have avoided their child being potentially traumatized by making sure the medical condition was on record.
10:21 September 5, 2011 by eppie
@ yeah, let's all without knowing the real facts start commenting on this and blame other people.

I think it is good that the state acts quick when they expect abuse......but of course they can never do it right.....because when they don't act and it turns out there was abuse it is still the states fault.

However, if it turns out that this indeed was not the case, of course a good apology has to be made.

@belmar. Great, you know a lot of facts.....but for the rest you don't have a clue do you?
11:04 September 5, 2011 by J. L. Belmar
10:21 September 5, 2011 by eppie

Are you addressing me? Or are you describing yourself? Because I have seen your comments and they really are pathetic. So, join Ricky Tracy and others and stay out of these threads, unless you come out with something that is not an attack like the ones you are used to do. And just be careful. I am not too patient.

Some people's children
11:59 September 5, 2011 by eppie
@belmar Quote. I am not too patient. unquote

No need to tell me this. This becomes pretty clear when reading your posts. Patience is a virtue that most people don't posses.

And usually when i say @ fillinnamehere followed by some sentence that contains the word 'you' I am not talking about myself.
16:05 September 5, 2011 by k2kats
While this summary leaves out many facts, one does wonder if (in the best interest of the child) authorities consulted her parents or physician for confirmation before subjecting her to a medical exam (by a stranger who may or may not specialize in her condition).

If not, it would be eminently reasonable to expect specialized training for all individuals involved.
16:48 September 5, 2011 by J. L. Belmar
11:59 September 5, 2011 by eppie

I do not need to be patient with nincompoops. I do not get along with mediocres like a nincompoop who writes around here.

You clearly wrote

@belmar. Great, you know a lot of facts.....but for the rest you don't have a clue do you?

So I will answer:

"The above is only a tiny part of a study made by Suzanne Robin, a registered nurse with more than 25 years of experience in oncology, labor/delivery, neonatal intensive care, infertility and ophthalmology. Robin received her R.N. degree from Western Oklahoma State College. She has co-authored and edited several books for the Wiley "Dummies" series.

If you want to read more about the subject, just go to

www.livestrong.com/article/105204-diseases-cause-easy-bruising-children/#ixzz1X3w9j0um

That means, nincompoop, that Robin is the one who knows a lot of facts and not me. Got it? Or shall we start all over again in your readina and analysing classes.
17:34 September 5, 2011 by Lavaux
As a lawyer who hails from the most litigious country in the world, I strongly advise that Sweden not provide the aggrieved parents a private cause of action against the state in the present case.

First, the taxpayers will pay all damages awarded to the parents plus all court costs and attorney fees should they prevail. If the state imposes liability on individual social workers in cases like the present one, then the social workers' collective bargaining agreement will pass the premiums on to the state, which the taxpayers will pay. Aren't taxes already high enough?

Second, social workers will acquire a strong cover-your-ass incentive that will lead to lousy service for everyone, and worse, picking on subjects who are least likely to assert their legal rights. In this case the sickening chestnut "poor hardest hit" really does apply.

Third, remedial politics will focus on retribution (punish the miscreants!) rather than reform (take power away from the miscreants so they can't do it again).

Let's face it, fellow expats: In Sweden, the state has a stronger claim on parental rights vis a vis our children than we do because the state knows what's best for them better than we do, and that's an extremely creepy attitude. We're never going to change this attitude by suing the pants off of them, particularly in view of another related Swedish attitude, namely, the state always means well even when it crushes people, and good intent obviates fault.
19:53 September 5, 2011 by Mark Rowlands
Well as someone whose children where removed under LVU, ( we got them back after a couple of court appearances ) I think I can comment from experience, The problem is not the law, It is the quality of the people applying it. Almost without exception the social services staff I met were barely capable of joined up writing and certainly not capable of joined up thinking.
16:57 September 6, 2011 by Streja
There was a case in Sweden in the 90's, where a little boy, a toddler, was taken from his parents because there was suspected abuse due to the many bruises on his body. The parents then contacted Expressen, who wrote an article on how the parents wanted their son back as he was suffering from a disease where he bruised easily. The campaign worked, the parents got their son back.

The child was dead some months after.
15:34 September 8, 2011 by Stopbeingsuchawuss
This is the right thing to do, if you or someone hit their child in Sweden know that it's illegal. Beating a child can cause psychological problems for life. Parents who does this deserves to get arrested, which is why the police does these actions.

They do it with the childs well being in mind. This is why I love Sweden.
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