• Sweden edition
 

Schyman launches "Feminist Initiative"

Published: 04 Apr 2005 17:21 GMT+02:00
Updated: 04 Apr 2005 17:21 GMT+02:00

For the time being, it's a society, rather than a political party. And there's no party leader or official programme of policies at the moment. Despite this, they are setting their sites on participation in the general election in September 2006.

"Now we've joined forces," announced Schyman, "women who have been working for different organisations on questions which affect women's lives. We're starting by seeking support. But those people who join up also have the chance to shape our future."

Sofia Karlsson, also on the FI board, explained the lack of a party leader:

"Maybe we won't have one. We want to build an antipatriarchal organisation. We're going to mount a serious challenge to the current gender-based power structures."

Schyman was confident of the broad appeal of the FI:

"We've formed a feminist intiative which cross boundaries - both political and generational."

Sharing the platform was Monica Amante, 26, representing women from ethnic minorities and Susanne Linde, 50, formerly of the Liberal Party. Schyman was not worried that the FI would split the left vote and make a conservative victory in the forthcoming election more likely:

"The greatest risk is that we end up with a society which discriminates against half the population. I think there are enough voters for everyone."

A congress is planned for September when the FI's constitution and political programme will be finalised and agreed upon. For the time being they are highlighting five issues which they intend to tackle: a change to the rape laws so that men have to ask women if they want sex; eradicate discrimination in the health service where women wait longer and get fewer referrals compared to men; address the wage discrepancy between male-dominated and female-dominated professions; reduce inequalities in parental leave, sick leave and other job market issues; and make sure that women can get asylum in Sweden for persecution due to their sex.

The government's response was led by Social Democrat party secretary, Marita Ulvskog, who recently started a new feminist network, Feministas. She thinks the more people working on women's issues the better, but...

"The problem is if they actually go ahead and form a party. They'll take voters mainly from the Greens and the Left Party and maybe even the Social Democrats. It could be the decisive factor in the conservatives winning the next election. Having Christian Democracts and Moderates making the decisions won't help women."

Most commentators believe the Left Party and the Greens are most vulnerable to a new feminist party. However, their spokespersons were surprisingly positive to the development.

"Those of us working on feminist issues feel lonely," said Pernilla Zethraeus of the Left Party. "The creation of this party is an indication that more needs to be done in this area."

Peter Eriksson of the Greens likened it in a statement to a kick up the backside for his party.

Leaders from the conservative alliance used the opportunity to take a pop at the government.

Fredrik Reinfeldt of the Moderates said:

"Today the foundations have been laid for a new coalition party for the Social Democrats. It looks like we have a situation where Göran Persson needs help from Gudrun Schyman to carry on in government."

"A resounding rejection of the socialist coalition's policies," said the Centre Party's Maud Olofsson.

In an analysis of the new political landscape, Henrik Brors of DN felt that the new Feminist Initiative had a good chance of getting 4% of the vote in the next election, which would give them seats in parliament under Sweden's proportional representation system.

He considered it was worst news for the Greens and the Left Party, both of whom run the risk of losing their parliamentary status.

"But even the Social Democrats risk losing voters - over 21% of their supporters would consider voting for a feminist party."

Despite the talk at the press conference of the FI being a broad church, Brors is convinced it is firmly in the left camp:

"With Gudrun Schyman in charge, I can't see it as anything other than a party of the left... Faced with a choice of supporting Persson or Reinfeldt, it'll go for Persson."

And whilst on the subject of Schyman, Brors considers the move not to announce a leader has more to do with pragmatic politics than ideals about changing the established order.

"The risk is that the FI would be completely portrayed as Gudrun Schyman's party. Her credibility could be low with a number of voters who remember the tax fiddling revelations. And her political opponents can remind everyone that little changed for women when she was leader of the Left Party."

Sources: Dagens Nyheter, Svenska Dagbladet, Aftonbladet

Today's headlines
Business
Sweden’s growth 'better than expected'
Strong household consumption is helping Sweden's growth. Photo: Mona-Lisa Djerf/SvD/TT

Sweden’s growth 'better than expected'

Sweden’s gross domestic product grew 2.6 percent in the second quarter of 2014 compared to the same period a year earlier, with the economy performing much better than previously thought. READ  

Presented by West Sweden
West Sweden prepares for lobster premiere
Sweden's lobster season starts on Monday. Photo: Jonas Ingman

West Sweden prepares for lobster premiere

It's almost time to catch your own dinner off the west coast of Sweden. The lobster season gets underway on Monday, with fishermen and tourists taking to the seas in the hope of stocking up on the traditional Swedish delicacy. READ  

National
Gas leak leaves Sony staff in Sweden hospital

Gas leak leaves Sony staff in Sweden hospital

An Ozone gas leak at Sony Mobile's offices in Lund has put eight people in hospital, with nine others needing to be checked by doctors. READ  

Elections 2014
Social Democrats get permission to govern
Stefan Löfven is set to become Prime Minister. Photo: TT

Social Democrats get permission to govern

Sweden's parliamentary speaker has given Social Democrat leader Stefan Löfven the all-clear to form a government. On Friday Löfven is expected to meet the heads of the Liberal and Centre parties. READ  

Elections 2014
Vote quirk gives Sweden Democrats extra seats
Sweden Democrat leader Jimmie Åkesson celebrates his party's election success. Photo: Lars Pehrson/SvD/TT

Vote quirk gives Sweden Democrats extra seats

The Sweden Democrats, who became the third largest party in Sunday's election, have learned they will get two more seats than expected due to a quirk in the country's election system. READ  

Tech
Ericsson to axe modems and cut jobs
Ericsson CEO Hans Vestberg, pictured here presenting the comapny's quarterly report in July. Photo: Annika af Klercker/TT

Ericsson to axe modems and cut jobs

Swedish telecom giant Ericsson has confirmed it will cut jobs in Sweden and abroad after the company announced on Thursday morning it would stop developing modems. READ  

Elections 2014
Centre party laughs off Löfven's advances
Annie Lööf speaks after her meeting with parliament's speaker on Wednesday. Photo: Fredrik Persson/TT

Centre party laughs off Löfven's advances

UPDATED: Centre Party leader Annie Lööf has reiterated her reluctance to cooperate across bloc lines with Social Democrat leader Stefan Löfven, as he renews his attempts to form a fresh government. READ  

Elections 2014
Sweden Democrats want prized speaker job
Sweden Democrat party secretary Björn Söder celebrates Sunday's election result. Photo: Anders Wiklund/TT

Sweden Democrats want prized speaker job

UPDATED: As Sweden’s third largest party, the Sweden Democrats "assume" they will be given one of a handful of prestigious parliamentary speaker jobs, party secretary Björn Söder tells The Local. READ  

National
Teens in intensive care after school 'initiation'
Photo: Peder Skrivares school

Teens in intensive care after school 'initiation'

School inspectors are investigating after an initiation ceremony at a high school in Varberg in south west Sweden left four girls in hospital. READ  

National
Pirate Bay Swede 'mistreated' in jail
Peter Sunde. Photo: TT

Pirate Bay Swede 'mistreated' in jail

The brother of Pirate Bay co-founder Peter Sunde has questioned the conditions of his brother's Swedish jail, slamming both the institution and the guards. READ  

RECEIVE OUR NEWSLETTER AND ALERTS
Society
What's on in Sweden
Politics
How Sweden Democrats went mainstream
Politics
Scandinavia and Scotland: closer links?
Gallery
Property of the week - Eskilstuna
Sponsored Article
How to start a business in Stockholm
Blog updates

17 September

Deep election analysis (Blogweiser) »

"You think you’re bad? Well I’m American. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFbomLID0vU Deep deep analysis on Swedish election results. Vlog post: https://t.co/tjQgfa5Yie #svpol #val2014 #politics pic.twitter.com/oEK5ADFT8L — Joel Sherwood (@joeldsherwood) September 17, 2014 " READ »

 

15 September

Liten, litet, små & lilla (The Swedish Teacher) »

"Hej igen! Have you ever been confused about when to use “liten”, “litet”, “små” and “lilla”? Today I’m going to sort out how use the adjective “liten” (small) and the different forms of it. Liten or litet? “Liten” is the form we will use when referring to a noun with the gender “en”. For example: Min pappa har en..." READ »

 
 
 
Society
How I became a surf blogger when I moved to Sweden
Gallery
People-watching: September 13th
Society
Why is Stockholm's Södermalm so cool?
Gallery
People-watching: September 11th
Gallery
People-watching: September 13th
Politics
Five possible election outcomes
Politics
Sweden elections: How do they work?
Politics
Sweden elections: Who's who?
Lifestyle
What's on in Sweden
Gallery
Property of the week - Hornstull, Stockholm
Analysis
Five differences between the UK and Sweden
Welshman Jonny Luck is now a chef in Sweden
Society
How I opened my own restaurant in Sweden's Malmö
Sponsored Article
Stockholm tech fest: relive the magic
Gallery
People-watching September 8th
Photo: TT
Politics
Feminists fight for first seats
Politics
Immigration cut push from Sweden Democrats
Sheryl Sandberg says women have "low expectations"
Tech
Facebook exec talks women's limits in Swedish business
Politics
Left Party calls for justice and equality
Politics
Green Party wants 'better world' for kids
Lifestyle
The five best Swedish songs of the month
Sponsored Article
Introducing… Insurance in Stockholm
Sponsored Article
Graduates: Insure your income in Sweden with AEA
Sponsored Article
Introducing...Your finances in Stockholm
Sponsored Article
Introducing...Housing in Stockholm
Latest news from The Local in Austria

More news from Austria at thelocal.at

Latest news from The Local in Switzerland

More news from Switzerland at thelocal.ch

Latest news from The Local in Germany

More news from Germany at thelocal.de

Latest news from The Local in Denmark

More news from Denmark at thelocal.dk

Latest news from The Local in Spain

More news from Spain at thelocal.es

Latest news from The Local in France

More news from France at thelocal.fr

Latest news from The Local in Italy

More news from Italy at thelocal.it

Latest news from The Local in Norway

More news from Norway at thelocal.no

863
jobs available
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions is an innovative business company which provides valuable assistance with the Swedish Authorities, Swedish language practice and general communications. Call 073-100 47 81 or visit:
www.swedishdowntown.com
PSD Media
PSD Media is marketing company that offers innovative solutions for online retailers. We provide modern solutions that help increase traffic and raise conversion. Visit our site at:
http://psdmedia.se
If you want to drink, that’s your business.
If you want to stop, we can help.

Learn more about English-language Alcoholics Anonymous in Sweden. No dues. No fees. Confidentiality assured.
AA-EUROPE.ORG/SWEDEN