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Care home staff weigh diapers to save money

TT/The Local/rm · 11 Nov 2011, 08:04

Published: 11 Nov 2011 08:04 GMT+01:00

“We’re not allowed to change the diaper until it has reached its full capacity. The aim is clearly to keep consumption down and save money," an anonymous member of staff told daily Dagens Nyheter (DN).

The result is that the old people are left with wet diapers for hours before they are changed, staff claims.

Sources have described to DN how staff is also instructed to weigh the diapers regularly to ascertain how many hours the patient can wear it before it starts leaking.

This way, staff can work out which brand to use in order to have to change the diapers as seldom as possible and avoid “unnecessary” changing.

However, according to the company’s head of information, Elisabeth Frostell, the project was launched in order to try out what incontinence pad was best for each individual patient.

“It is not a question of residents being forced to wear wet diapers. The assessment is done with the client’s best interest at heart,” she told the paper.

The company also announced on Thursday that they are scrapping their controversial bonus program whereby management were said to reward the homes that managed to save the most money.

Story continues below…

“The wrong things may never be prioritized. We have now banned all bonuses in our operations, and of course that goes for my own as well," Carema CEO Carl Gyllfors wrote on the company website.

TT/The Local/rm (news@thelocal.se)

Your comments about this article

08:41 November 11, 2011 by krow
Clowns. It is time everyman takes care of their own elderly ones. Scrap the elederly homes and give money to their loveones.
10:04 November 11, 2011 by KGren
That is sick. I know its tough work, but there's no excuse for cheapness.

Instead why don't they pay out bonuses for staff with the highest satisfaction rankings?????

(from residents able to rate their satisfaction level, and family/friends that visit regularly)?

hmmmm....incentives for staff to do a GOOD job- what a concept!!!

These people may be old, but they're NOT stupid, and they know when they're being abused.
10:13 November 11, 2011 by Tennin
This is just sickening!
10:23 November 11, 2011 by thinkright24
@krow. well said

i fail to understand how people leave their parent in old houses. Imagine the moral values of a nation where parent are dying in the old homes when kids are partying.

the one who can not take care of his/her parent has not heart, no love, no mercy, no moral.

what a shame.
11:41 November 11, 2011 by GeeG
@ thinkright 24:

At times, elderly family members have medical issues that cannot be addressed at home, but are not serious enough to require hospitalization. That is why nursing homes exist. They have trained medical staff that is supposed to afford care towards the patients needs, not necessarily in their BEST needs. Anyone that has an elderly loved one in a facility needs to be vigilant in monitoring the care of their relative, not just dump them and visit when it is convenient. This requires a lot of research you should also interview other residents about the quality of care they receive.

It is a sad day to think that our elderly have become burdens versus resources in our lives.
11:56 November 11, 2011 by hunnysnowbee
You are f****** kidding me???? OMG if parents did this to a baby/toddler, social services would probably remove the child on grounds of neglect...and rightly so! How on earth can they justify doing this to vulnerable, elderly people?
12:00 November 11, 2011 by StockholmSam
@Krow and Thinkright24

There are many, many children who would take the money and abuse the parents even worse because there would be even less oversight into how they are caring for the old parents. It would be tougher to catch the offenders if it went totally private and the responsibility of caring for them went to their families.
12:09 November 11, 2011 by Svensksmith
Doesn't bode well to grow old. Time to take up smoking and drinking in earnest.
12:59 November 11, 2011 by Kaethar
Carema needs to be shut down. They've already been kicked out of dozens of region for doing a poor job. Everyone signed with Carema need to switch company so this mess comes to an end.
14:52 November 11, 2011 by old jack
If these were not elderly people in state facilities but instead, children in private homes with their parents - then, what would the state do? How would the state react to parents who neglected to buy toilet paper, cleaning supplies, etc? Parents who didn't keep their homes sanitary? Parents who opted to save money by leaving soiled diapers on their young ones?

By law, the state can take anyone's child on any whim, and apparently they do! Why are children seized when there is no evidence, while when there is overwhelming evidence of neglect/abuse regarding the elderly, the state doesn't take drastic immediate actions to protect these lives?
15:04 November 11, 2011 by eppie
@krow

yeah great idea. No sorry I can't have a normal job because I have to take care of my parents. Are you crazy?

There is a reason why people can't do this which is not just because they are somehow bad people.

However nice it would be, in modern society you can't do these things yourself. End of discussion.

That nursing homes should have some standards is a whole different question of course.
20:06 November 11, 2011 by Tanskalainen
Please put Betty White in this home.
21:52 November 11, 2011 by swedejane
I hope that on the day I realize I'm headed for a nursing home, I still have enough wits and ability to drag myself out to a beautiful forrest with a needle, a spoon, and a .45. They'll never take me alive...and I certainly won't have some idiot weighing my diaper.
23:15 November 11, 2011 by dizzymoe33
This is so disgusting!!! What a joke I feel so sorry for your elderly. But the good news someday those bastards will get old too and then it will be there turn sitting in filthy diapers all day long. With no toilet paper or food.
09:46 November 12, 2011 by ann2
Oddly enough, one of the first things I remember when I moved to Sweden 10 years ago was an Uppdrag Granskning report about a couple whose child was removed from their care, and one of the reasons was that they changed the diaper too often (they also didn't boil the välling before serving it, it was their first time making it -- hideous swedish gruel! my babies never got it). It took me a long time in fact as a new mother to understand that diapers don't have to be changed immediately upon peeing. Perhaps the nursing home was scared that the patient would be removed from their care if social services found out they had changed the diaper too quickly.
09:51 November 12, 2011 by star10
The children of those elderly should take equal blame. They should check their parents status regularly.
17:27 November 12, 2011 by soultraveler3
How can this be allowed to happen? We ready some horror story about nursing homes here almost every week. How can the employees doing this live with themselves?

I agree with the others who have stated that if this was happening at a private home or some kind of state childcare / foster facility that the government would've already been there and taken the children away. Is it okay since they're elderly??

Never get sick or old in Sweden.
20:02 November 12, 2011 by zoroastrina
swedejane

I hope that on the day I realize I'm headed for a nursing home, I still have enough wits and ability to drag myself out to a beautiful forrest with a needle, a spoon, and a .45. They'll never take me alive...and I certainly won't have some idiot weighing my diaper. THESE OLD AGE ASYLUMS ARE HUMAN WASTE DISPOSAL UNITS! If it is god's will that humans suffer incredibly at the hands of their fellow humans in old age, then

god can go to hell. These uncaring "care homes" are capitalism's and socialism's way of dealing with human waste matter that is too slow dying.
18:09 November 13, 2011 by knonwhite
You reap what you sow........

One day you people will also get a chance to taste this situation....

Don't abandon your old parents...
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