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Swedish town retreats from radiation-free zone

Swedish town retreats from radiation-free zone

Published: 28 Nov 2011 10:33 GMT+01:00
Updated: 28 Nov 2011 10:33 GMT+01:00

Mora municipality in central Sweden has decided not to accede to the wishes of an "electro-oversensitive" local resident and introduce a "radiation-free" zone in order to maintain mobile phone coverage.

The Local reported last week about a local man, known to don a silver-coloured suit to protect himself from mobile phone mast radiation, who had demanded that the town create a “radiation-free zone” in his garden.

While municipal officials initially indicated a readiness to meet the man's demands, experts were quick to warn that the move may leave half the county without mobile phone coverage.

The environmental office in Mora-Orsa had been keen to force mobile operators to shift the direction of their masts, but municipal officials have now put their foot down and called a halt to the plans.

"The municipality is not going to take any measures in this matter," said Bengt-Åke Rehn at Mora municipality to the Expressen daily.

62-year-old Dan Bengtsson, who lives outside of Mora, has long complained of headaches, back problems, and painful prickles in his heart and believes that mobile and TV mast radition is to blame, despite the lack of scientific evidence.

Bengtsson describes himself as "electro-oversensitive" and claims that his health has deteriorated since the mobile mast network was expanded in the area.

The silver suit he sometimes wears dampens the effect somewhat, but not completely, according to Bengtsson.

”It looks a little bit like a space suit,” Bengtsson told the Aftonbladet daily last week.

Bengtsson's problems began in 1992 when he lived on the west coast and worked as an electrical engineer for a power company.

In 2005 he moved with his wife to the little village Venjan in Mora municipality in Dalarna, to escape the electricity and radiation.

“But I still have not managed to find a decent home. Mobile phone radiation is unavoidable. It is everywhere in Sweden,” he said.

According to experts in the field, there is however no scientific proof that mast radiation is harmful to humans.

”The decision which the municipality is about to take is not based on any scientific evidence. There is no known biological mechanism for how a low level of exposure emitted by mobile base stations could have any detrimental health effects,” Maria Feychting, epidemiology professor at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, told the Dagens Nyheter daily on Friday.

The Local (news@thelocal.se)

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Your comments about this article

11:26 November 28, 2011 by Åskar
I think he would be better off if he moved to Säter instead.
20:40 November 28, 2011 by eddie123
why not up north to Suomi territory
21:49 November 28, 2011 by Puffin
LOL Askar

(assuming you mean the psychiatric hospital)
05:28 November 29, 2011 by DOCTORS W.A.R.N.
Current FCC regulations controlling human exposure to radio frequency radiation, emitted by every communication antenna, are based on research conducted before 1986. These regulations are long out of date. The national wireless infrastructure has expanded enormously since then. No medical or health studies were done for this, only engineers were consulted.

A recent review of the scientific literature on cell phones points out that 68% of studies have found one or more biological effects from levels of radiation previously deemed "safe."1 This radiation is now being associated with attention deficit disorder, autism, sleep disorders, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy, as well as asthma, diabetes, malignant melanoma, breast cancer, and other illnesses that have become increasingly more common. Diabetics who are exposed to cell phones and antennas require higher doses of insulin to control their blood sugar. The symptoms of people with multiple sclerosis worsen.

Many people are not aware that the Telecommunications Act, a federal law passed by the U.S. Congress in 1996, prohibits municipalities from regulating wireless technology on the basis of health or environment.

As a physician, this alarms me. I believe health and environmental effects are the main issues for us to consider when we evaluate new technologies.

It is research in Europe that has established:

1) kids who use cellphones--especially to the ear--have a 500% increase in brain gliomas (the cause of the highest mortality rate in kids in Australia) and

2) 360% increase in tumors of the eye nearest the cell phone, and

3) now research in China and Israel found a soaring rise in parotid gland tumors (salivary glands in the cheek used.) This is happening to adults as well.
07:43 November 29, 2011 by Eric Aker
Carl Sagan (the astronomer) said that ordinary claim need ordinary evidence,

extra ordinary claims need extra ordinary evidence.

The long list of claims seam extra ordinary to me, so I need extra evidence.

I would like to see the refrences to peer reviewed articals in reputable publications.

Not just claims by unknown and unrecognised sources.

Being "associated with" and "cause of" are very different.

97% of people in auto accidents ate french fries withing 30 days,

therefore french fry eating is associated with auto accidents.

Should we ban french fries in order to prevent auto accidents?
19:39 December 2, 2011 by tadchem
Hypochondria is a hell of a way to do medical research.

Radio waves have been *everywhere* since Marconi.

Electromagnetic fields are older than Edison.

The whole world is a magnet.

Solar flares are older than the planet.

Bengtsson needs to find a better excuse for dressing up like a Cyberman.
17:51 December 3, 2011 by D. ane
There are plenty of reasearch papers showing the mobile phone technologies which use microwaves are detrimental to health. The influential mobile phone companies are managing to suppress them and they don't appear in the media. We only ever hear about those research results which are not supposed to show any ill-effects.

The mobile phone companies have bought the media, (which fear loss of revenue from advetising of mobile phones, ) and the government. Remember the 20billion pounds that the UK government received for licences for bandwidths from the industry t? Do you think the governemnt is going to admit there are health problems with these microwaves? Imagine the litigation costs!

And not that we need research papers to show some of us that microwaves are causing health problems. National statistics show that there are increases in mental health problems, suicides, ADHD. Doctors have observed increases in brain tumours and breast cancers.

As for me I notice the difference after I use a mobile phone - the headaches, depression and bad temper are evident.

Never dismiss 'anectodal evidence'.

If peopie knew the risks then they might use them more sparingly, and keep their children well away from these technologies, which include WiFis, DECT phones, microwave ovens and smart meters!
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