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No charges for cop who shot jewel raid suspect

The Local · 11 Jan 2013, 09:41

Published: 11 Jan 2013 09:41 GMT+01:00

"The police have not been careless, indefensible or acted incorrectly in any way," wrote prosecutor Kay Engfeldt, according to the TT news agency.

During an attempted robbery of a jewellery store in Södertälje last Friday, police opened fire on a group of suspected thieves bearing what appeared to be at least one automatic weapon.

One of the suspected thieves was shot by police in the head, and left behind by his accomplices as they made their getaway.

The gunshot victim, a 26-year-old, died as a result of the injuries on Wednesday.

His weapon, which was also left behind at the scene, was later discovered to be just a replica.

Click here more images from the scene

Four other people have since been held on remand in connection with the raid.

While an initial probe was opened against the police officer's actions, the case was dropped on Friday, as the police acted in accordance of the law.

Story continues below…

Prosecutor Engfeldt wrote that police "as a rule, don't know with any high degree of certainty exactly where the bullet will hit".

TT/The Local/og

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Your comments about this article

10:58 January 11, 2013 by RobinHood
"as a rule, [you] don't know with any high degree of certainty exactly where the bullet will hit".

A basic rule of good firearms practise is that if you don't know with any high degree of certainty exactly where your bullet will hit; then hold your fire until you do. Particularly if you are shooting at someone standing on a busy street, with houses shops and offices directly behind your target.

Perhaps someone should send Prosecutor Engfedlt for some basic firearms training before he handles these type of cases again. With lawyers like this advising the police on good firearms practice, Stockholm will go the way of Dodge City. Even in the gun happy US, policemen are expected to follow basic firearms safety rules.

Having said that, I strongly suspect this particular officer knew exactly where his bullet would hit and quite rightly took the shot and hit his/her target.
11:30 January 11, 2013 by Boar
Police job is risky. They are always under pressure throughout their service. It's easy to sit on a chair and judge things. But, in practice you act fast and the reaction is not same. The thieves are not just standing with an apple on their head and saying please shoot on the apple or if you miss then let us run.

I am happy that nothing happened to police. They shooted and scared the police. Police had done for self protection. It's OK for the person to die. Otherwise it would have costed atleast 10 million for this thief's rehabilitation throughout his life. And, moreover he will never work his whole life but suk the system whole life.

Do you mean that police need to wait until the thieves run away and then start their job? Then, what is the use of the police to come on the scene and do? Tell the people to please move and put a tape around and then start their duty? Well, then they can just sit in the station and go there when the robbery is finished. Why not we put cameras whole Sweden then?
16:04 January 11, 2013 by skylarkpilot
I just love the line "shot in the head which ultimately caused his death" what else was he dying from then.......

As for shooting, everyone who has ever been involved in Police firearms training can tell you that you always aim for maximum mass, that is, the chest area. A slightly high shot in the head is just a probable result of a rush of nervous adrenalin making the officer pull rather than squeeze the trigger.

I think when someone is holding what appears to be an assault rifle a bit of nervous energy is entirely understandable.

Live by the sword die by the sword. It matters not that this may have been an imitation firearm. It's carried during the course of a crime with the intention of making people believe it's real. The shots a good'un.

I often criticise what I see of Police in Sweden, but I will also praise where I see bravery and commitment to duty. In this case I believe the officer who took the shot deserves a medal !
16:24 January 11, 2013 by rebelart.se
a man died....

the pig should have showed some restraint..

16:38 January 11, 2013 by Wireless.Phil
I watch the shootout on TV in the USA. I believe it was on the show "Right This Minute", their web site may have it, but good luck finding it.
16:48 January 11, 2013 by Abe L
What about a medal and a raise?
17:54 January 11, 2013 by Avidror
Here is the video of the shooting:

19:54 January 11, 2013 by thecritic
Let it be known that not too many whites call the police "the pig" by the way...no wonder why he's hurt. Oh, it's not a man it's a ROBBER!
20:15 January 11, 2013 by Svensksmith
"The pig" was being fired upon. Justifiable shooting as far as I or anyone with any sense is concerned.
21:14 January 11, 2013 by Mark S.
RobinHood is being picky about the definition of "exactly".

The prosecutor means that you can't expect the police to "shoot to wound". You can't count on somebody's aim being that good, especially in a life-threatening situation.

Rather, when they draw their gun, the police have to assume that they are about to kill somebody. When interacting with police, it is always a good idea to not be such a threat that the police have to think about whether to kill you. For example, I can strongly recommend that you never point a gun at the police.

Rebelart is correct that a man died, but how might that man have avoided dying? Maybe not starting a shootout with the police would have helped.
22:23 January 11, 2013 by johan rebel
"As for shooting, everyone who has ever been involved in Police firearms training can tell you that you always aim for maximum mass, that is, the chest area"

Have to disagree with you there.

- If you are completely confident you will hit your target, aim for the head. A bullet in the brain is the best way to eliminate a threat.

- If the target is moving or the range is too great, aim for the abdomen. Swedish police use Speer Gold Dot 9mm bullets which deform on impact and send a shockwave through the surrounding tissue. Such bullets cause far more damage when they hit the relatively solid abdomen packed with guts and several important organs. That's where the maximum mass is. The thoracic cavity, on the other hand, contains mostly air, which means the shockwave will cause far less damage. Even if a bullet striking the abdomen does not damage any vital organs, it is sure to shred the intestines, which will spill their contents, thus probably causing infections which could prove fatal.

The last thing you want to aim for is the heart, which cannot even be see from the outside. Only heroes in stupid action films try that.

In this instance, I highly doubt the cop aimed for the head, given the range and the fact that the targets were moving. If he did, he must have been both a marksman and ice cold. Not many cops like that in Sweden, I suspect.
18:50 January 12, 2013 by Avidror
The videos of the shooting can be found on YouTube. Just type "Police Gunfight, Shooting Robbers Jewelry Heist in Södertälje, Sweden".


"Even in the gun happy US, policemen are expected to follow basic firearms safety rules."

Yeah, sure. Just ask Amadou Diallo. Oops! You can't because he's dead. 41 shots fired by 4 policemen, though "only" 19 hit the (unarmed) victim.

Yeah, "basic firearms safety rules", for sure.
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