• Sweden edition
 
No charges for cop who shot jewel raid suspect

No charges for cop who shot jewel raid suspect

Published: 11 Jan 2013 09:41 GMT+01:00
Updated: 11 Jan 2013 09:41 GMT+01:00

Prosecutors have dropped a manslaughter probe into the police officer who shot a suspected jewel thief in the head last week in Södertälje, south of Stockholm, ultimately causing his death.

"The police have not been careless, indefensible or acted incorrectly in any way," wrote prosecutor Kay Engfeldt, according to the TT news agency.

During an attempted robbery of a jewellery store in Södertälje last Friday, police opened fire on a group of suspected thieves bearing what appeared to be at least one automatic weapon.

One of the suspected thieves was shot by police in the head, and left behind by his accomplices as they made their getaway.

The gunshot victim, a 26-year-old, died as a result of the injuries on Wednesday.

His weapon, which was also left behind at the scene, was later discovered to be just a replica.

Click here more images from the scene

Four other people have since been held on remand in connection with the raid.

While an initial probe was opened against the police officer's actions, the case was dropped on Friday, as the police acted in accordance of the law.

Prosecutor Engfeldt wrote that police "as a rule, don't know with any high degree of certainty exactly where the bullet will hit".

TT/The Local/og

Follow The Local on Twitter

The Local (news@thelocal.se)

Don't miss...X
Left Right

Your comments about this article

10:58 January 11, 2013 by RobinHood
"as a rule, [you] don't know with any high degree of certainty exactly where the bullet will hit".

A basic rule of good firearms practise is that if you don't know with any high degree of certainty exactly where your bullet will hit; then hold your fire until you do. Particularly if you are shooting at someone standing on a busy street, with houses shops and offices directly behind your target.

Perhaps someone should send Prosecutor Engfedlt for some basic firearms training before he handles these type of cases again. With lawyers like this advising the police on good firearms practice, Stockholm will go the way of Dodge City. Even in the gun happy US, policemen are expected to follow basic firearms safety rules.

Having said that, I strongly suspect this particular officer knew exactly where his bullet would hit and quite rightly took the shot and hit his/her target.
11:30 January 11, 2013 by Boar
Police job is risky. They are always under pressure throughout their service. It's easy to sit on a chair and judge things. But, in practice you act fast and the reaction is not same. The thieves are not just standing with an apple on their head and saying please shoot on the apple or if you miss then let us run.

I am happy that nothing happened to police. They shooted and scared the police. Police had done for self protection. It's OK for the person to die. Otherwise it would have costed atleast 10 million for this thief's rehabilitation throughout his life. And, moreover he will never work his whole life but suk the system whole life.

Do you mean that police need to wait until the thieves run away and then start their job? Then, what is the use of the police to come on the scene and do? Tell the people to please move and put a tape around and then start their duty? Well, then they can just sit in the station and go there when the robbery is finished. Why not we put cameras whole Sweden then?
16:04 January 11, 2013 by skylarkpilot
I just love the line "shot in the head which ultimately caused his death" what else was he dying from then.......

As for shooting, everyone who has ever been involved in Police firearms training can tell you that you always aim for maximum mass, that is, the chest area. A slightly high shot in the head is just a probable result of a rush of nervous adrenalin making the officer pull rather than squeeze the trigger.

I think when someone is holding what appears to be an assault rifle a bit of nervous energy is entirely understandable.

Live by the sword die by the sword. It matters not that this may have been an imitation firearm. It's carried during the course of a crime with the intention of making people believe it's real. The shots a good'un.

I often criticise what I see of Police in Sweden, but I will also praise where I see bravery and commitment to duty. In this case I believe the officer who took the shot deserves a medal !
16:24 January 11, 2013 by rebelart.se
a man died....

the pig should have showed some restraint..

f.t.p
16:38 January 11, 2013 by Wireless.Phil
I watch the shootout on TV in the USA. I believe it was on the show "Right This Minute", their web site may have it, but good luck finding it.
16:48 January 11, 2013 by Abe L
What about a medal and a raise?
17:54 January 11, 2013 by Avidror
Here is the video of the shooting:

http://www.vg.no/nyheter/utenriks/artikkel.php?artid=10072351
19:54 January 11, 2013 by thecritic
Let it be known that not too many whites call the police "the pig" by the way...no wonder why he's hurt. Oh, it's not a man it's a ROBBER!
20:15 January 11, 2013 by Svensksmith
"The pig" was being fired upon. Justifiable shooting as far as I or anyone with any sense is concerned.
21:14 January 11, 2013 by Mark S.
RobinHood is being picky about the definition of "exactly".

The prosecutor means that you can't expect the police to "shoot to wound". You can't count on somebody's aim being that good, especially in a life-threatening situation.

Rather, when they draw their gun, the police have to assume that they are about to kill somebody. When interacting with police, it is always a good idea to not be such a threat that the police have to think about whether to kill you. For example, I can strongly recommend that you never point a gun at the police.

Rebelart is correct that a man died, but how might that man have avoided dying? Maybe not starting a shootout with the police would have helped.
22:23 January 11, 2013 by johan rebel
"As for shooting, everyone who has ever been involved in Police firearms training can tell you that you always aim for maximum mass, that is, the chest area"

Have to disagree with you there.

- If you are completely confident you will hit your target, aim for the head. A bullet in the brain is the best way to eliminate a threat.

- If the target is moving or the range is too great, aim for the abdomen. Swedish police use Speer Gold Dot 9mm bullets which deform on impact and send a shockwave through the surrounding tissue. Such bullets cause far more damage when they hit the relatively solid abdomen packed with guts and several important organs. That's where the maximum mass is. The thoracic cavity, on the other hand, contains mostly air, which means the shockwave will cause far less damage. Even if a bullet striking the abdomen does not damage any vital organs, it is sure to shred the intestines, which will spill their contents, thus probably causing infections which could prove fatal.

The last thing you want to aim for is the heart, which cannot even be see from the outside. Only heroes in stupid action films try that.

In this instance, I highly doubt the cop aimed for the head, given the range and the fact that the targets were moving. If he did, he must have been both a marksman and ice cold. Not many cops like that in Sweden, I suspect.
18:50 January 12, 2013 by Avidror
The videos of the shooting can be found on YouTube. Just type "Police Gunfight, Shooting Robbers Jewelry Heist in Södertälje, Sweden".

@RobinHood

"Even in the gun happy US, policemen are expected to follow basic firearms safety rules."

Yeah, sure. Just ask Amadou Diallo. Oops! You can't because he's dead. 41 shots fired by 4 policemen, though "only" 19 hit the (unarmed) victim.

Yeah, "basic firearms safety rules", for sure.
Today's headlines
Police seeking missing Swede in London
Sofie Marie Jansson, who is currently missing in London. Photo: Metropolitan Police

Police seeking missing Swede in London

British police have issued a plea for tips in the search to find Swedish national Sofie Marie Jansson who has been missing for almost a week. READ () »

University applications rocket to record high

University applications rocket to record high

Swedish universities continue to draw a record numbers of applicants with the number of prospective students seeking a third level education increasing for the seventh year in a row. READ () »

Teen in 'Jihad Jane' Vilks murder plot sentenced
Swedish artist Lars Vilks pictured in New York in 2012. Photo: Linus Sundahl-Djerf/TT

Teen in 'Jihad Jane' Vilks murder plot sentenced

American authorities have sentenced a 20-year-old accomplice of 'Jihad Jane' to five years in prison for an attempted terror plot to kill Swedish artist Lars Vilks, after getting involved with the murder plans when he was a teenager. READ () »

Sweden scraps 'new start zones' after EU input
Integration Minister Erik Ullenhag visits a school in Tensta, one of the neighbourhoods mentioned when he and his colleagues first floated the new start zone proposal. File: TT

Sweden scraps 'new start zones' after EU input

Sweden has abandoned a plan to ease taxes for small companies in blighted areas after the European Commission challenged its legality. READ () »

'Easter eggs an invitation to spread germs'
A typical Swedish Easter egg. Photo: Jessica Gow/TT

'Easter eggs an invitation to spread germs'

A Swedish microbiologist has warned that traditional Swedish Easter eggs laden with candy are an open invitation to the spread of bacteria and viruses. "Is this really a good idea?" he asked. READ () »

Jammed truck snarls Stockholm rush hour
Photo: Anders Wiklund/TT

Jammed truck snarls Stockholm rush hour

PICTURES: A truck got wedged inside a tunnel in central Stockholm on Thursday, with authorities concerned the accident may have damaged cables in the tunnel's ceiling. READ () »

Kids in Victorian garb mark Swedish Easter
A Swedish Easter witch holding daffodils. File photo: TT

Kids in Victorian garb mark Swedish Easter

In India, I'd notice Easter only from the traffic jam outside the churches, but here witches, egg hunts, and feathers mark the Christian holiday. The Local's Deepti Vashisht brings you the various shades of Swedish Easter. READ () »

Swedish MP ordered chemtrail probe
Chemtrails?: Shutterstock.

Swedish MP ordered chemtrail probe

A Swedish MP who launched an official government investigation into the existence of chemtrails tells The Local why he thinks Swedes deserve the truth, even if it may leave some conspiracy theorists unsatisfied. READ () »

PM pleads ignorance of Vattenfall's Nuon bid
Fredrik Reinfeldt answers the constitutional affairs committee's questions. Photo: TT

PM pleads ignorance of Vattenfall's Nuon bid

Sweden's prime minister on Thursday said Vattenfall itself, not its owners the Swedish state, had responsibility for the loss-making Nuon deal. READ () »

'Kockums submarine raid may be illegal': lawyer
Photo: TT

'Kockums submarine raid may be illegal': lawyer

A Swedish lawyer says the Swedish military may have broken the law when it raided the Malmö premises of German defence giant Thyssen Krupp. READ () »

RECEIVE OUR NEWSLETTER AND ALERTS
Society
Swedish supermarket Ica pulls contested Easter commercial off air
Kungahuset
Society
Swedish royals set baptism date for princess
finest.se
Gallery
People-watching April 16
Politics
Who's the prime minister's heir?
Alfie Atkins
Society
Are children's books the key to families integrating in Sweden?
National
'Sweden Dem protests cater to party's martyr image'
National
'Swedish research grants were fantastic, but now it's like Australia'
Society
Only in Sweden: The ten problems you'd never encounter elsewhere
National
Swedes stopped to take my picture, but didn't look me in the eyes
Business & Money
A swipe of the hand replaced cash and cards in Lund
YouTube
Features
Video: Oliver Gee finds out how to embrace The Swedish Hug
TT
National
Abba duo hints at reunion
Advertisement:
Private
National
Flash mobs hug it out across Sweden
Finest.se
Gallery
People-watching April 11-13
TT
Politics
Swedes to give six-hour workday a go
TT
Society
Aussie choir member wows Abba in Sweden
YouTube
Society
Stockholm magic a surprise YouTube hit
Fastighetsbyrån
Society
Gallery: The Local's Property of the Week
Private
Society
Swedes find 200-year-old gravestone in living room
Stockholm School of Economics
Sponsored Article
Why a bachelor's degree is no longer enough
Deepti Vashisht
Features
Deepti Vashisht dissects the magic of Sweden's personal ID number
Shutterstock
Society
Ten signs you've been in Sweden too long
Society
Jimi Fritze heard every word when doctors discussed taking his organs
Society
A Swedish farmer explains why the new bestiality ban is 'pointless'
ESL
Sponsored Article
Learning Swedish the easy way
Latest news from The Local in Switzerland

More news from Switzerland at thelocal.ch

Latest news from The Local in Germany

More news from Germany at thelocal.de

Latest news from The Local in Spain

More news from Spain at thelocal.es

Latest news from The Local in France

More news from France at thelocal.fr

Latest news from The Local in Italy

More news from Italy at thelocal.it

Latest news from The Local in Norway

More news from Norway at thelocal.no

Blog Update: The Diplomatic Dispatch

28 October 15:16

The Green Growth Group Summit »

"Today on the 28 October in Brussels, a large group of key EU Ministers and business people, including UK Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change Edward Davey, and Swedish Environment Minister Lena Ek, will meet to discuss green growth. They all have a stake in resolving a challenge which, although it is crucial..." READ »

772
jobs available
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions is an innovative business company which provides valuable assistance with the Swedish Authorities, Swedish language practice and general communications. Call 073-100 47 81 or visit:
www.swedishdowntown.com