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How to store fire wood

Bark up or bark down?

Johno
post 22.Feb.2013, 11:37 AM
Post #1
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

Just from the Daily Mail (yes, I know), but this sure sounds like the George Orwell Big Enders and Little Enders feud !

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-22...-fireplace.html
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SimonDMontfort
post 22.Feb.2013, 11:54 AM
Post #2
Location: Stockholm county
Joined: 8.Feb.2011

Was the Daily Mail's phrase "splitting the country straight down the middle" perhaps a pun...? wink.gif

I must admit, when I first bought a property in Sweden, the old chap I bought it from told me you must always store the firewood 'bark side down' because moisture could escape more easily - and I've just gone on doing it ever since.

Never had a problem with burning it, so I guessed he was right in what he said - and not 'barking' laugh.gif
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Johno
post 22.Feb.2013, 12:08 PM
Post #3
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

Actually, I guess its when stored outdoors it might matter. Bark on the top will prevent water going into the wood if rain hits the stack, but not hinder drying. Indoors, no difference ?
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byke
post 22.Feb.2013, 12:13 PM
Post #4
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

I usually wrap each piece in tin foil
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Hisingen
post 22.Feb.2013, 01:22 PM
Post #5
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

Hi Byke - with that comment you must be bark-ing mad or else bark-ing up the wrong tree. rolleyes.gif
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SimonDMontfort
post 22.Feb.2013, 01:41 PM
Post #6
Location: Stockholm county
Joined: 8.Feb.2011

Well – Byke must be commended for services to the tin foil industry – I mean 15-20+ cubic metres of firewood…? All pieces wrapped individually…? unsure.gif

I store my firewood ‘bark down’ in the autumn - in a covered, well ventilated shed which keeps most of the ’elements’ out – but allows the air to circulate freely. But as I generally need 20 cubic metres of the stuff - ‘hand on heart’ I can’t absolutely swear that every piece is bark down. wink.gif

The only time my firewood is in the ‘open’ is in the summer to allow it to dry out (hopefully in the sun). What I do works for me.

I suppose the Daily Fail, like so many English tabloids, likes to portray Scandinavians as unexcitable, slow to become animated about anything, (etc) so the idea that anyone could become excited about how to store firewood is novel to the Mail.
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Svensksmith
post 22.Feb.2013, 03:11 PM
Post #7
Joined: 28.Jul.2011

If stored outside, the bottom layer that touches the ground is stored bark down, the rest bark up.
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skogsbo
post 22.Feb.2013, 06:18 PM
Post #8
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

No stacking here, just thrown in the wood shed loose, how it lands is how it stays! But as we work through the wood, birch bark is kept for lighting the fire, natures fire lighters!, as for drying, we do have a system that means its all very seasoned.

Cut late autumn/ winter and just left in 1-5m lengths.
Summer its cut into logs and split, but only when it dry and not just rained on.
Thrown in wood shed
But we have a 1-2 year rotation, so what I split this summer won't see a fire until at least October 2014. Luckily we can store about 60-70m3 inside. I think not neatly stacking allows more ventilation and the shed has 2 sets of doors, which we open on hot or dry windy days in summer.
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johnjohn
post 22.Feb.2013, 06:34 PM
Post #9
Joined: 10.Dec.2010

It makes no difference as it will only dry so much then retain an average moisture content based upon the relative humidity of the air. Your wood shed advantage is 75% relative humidity your wood will be about 15% bark side up or down.
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Rick Methven
post 22.Feb.2013, 07:03 PM
Post #10
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

This thread makes my hip hurt as in 2005 I helped a friend build a new covered wood store, and then we moved a heap of wood from a pile under a tarpaulin to the wood shed. As we got to the bottom layer which was on some old pallets, my foot went through the rotten wood just as I was swinging with an arm full of logs. My body swung but my foot was trapped and I fell over on to a rock right on my hip. Seven years later and it still hursts like hell. angry.gif
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skogsbo
post 22.Feb.2013, 07:33 PM
Post #11
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (johnjohn @ 22.Feb.2013, 06:34 PM) *
It makes no difference as it will only dry so much then retain an average moisture content based upon the relative humidity of the air. Your wood shed advantage is 75% relativ ... (show full quote)

That's about right, I've tested it with a moisture meter out of curiosity, when I was testing some planks that were air drying outside (under cover though).
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johnjohn
post 22.Feb.2013, 07:42 PM
Post #12
Joined: 10.Dec.2010

QUOTE (Rick Methven @ 22.Feb.2013, 07:03 PM) *
This thread makes my hip hurt as in 2005 I helped a friend build a new covered wood store, and then we moved a heap of wood from a pile under a tarpaulin to the wood shed. As ... (show full quote)

I was told not to store wood under a tarpaulin. Now I know why. smile.gif
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Svensksmith
post 22.Feb.2013, 08:47 PM
Post #13
Joined: 28.Jul.2011

I only stack the wood as it saves space and it looks a little neater. I saw the most meticulously firewood stacks when I lived in Sweden. Mine never end up that way. Figure I touch each piece of wood a minimum of seven times between the cutting, loading and unloading, splitting, stacking and toting into the house. Some of the pieces of wood become so familiar I ought to give them names.
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skogsbo
post 22.Feb.2013, 09:50 PM
Post #14
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (johnjohn @ 22.Feb.2013, 07:42 PM) *
I was told not to store wood under a tarpaulin. Now I know why. smile.gif

Condensation, its ok if you leave a gap, but then you'll be making a sail!

QUOTE (Svensksmith @ 22.Feb.2013, 08:47 PM) *
I only stack the wood as it saves space and it looks a little neater. I saw the most meticulously firewood stacks when I lived in Sweden. Mine never end up that way. Figure I ... (show full quote)

Chainsaw, hand piled, tractored to processing place, chainsaw some to 1m lengths, cut to logs, larger ones split and thrown in. 5 or 6. The pile is right next to the circular cutter, the smaller logs drop into a barrow and are shifted inside, the splitter is just inside the wood shed. So the smaller the wood, the nearer its final resting place. Minimum lifting and throwing etc.
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skogsbo
post 22.Feb.2013, 09:50 PM
Post #15
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (johnjohn @ 22.Feb.2013, 07:42 PM) *
I was told not to store wood under a tarpaulin. Now I know why. smile.gif

Condensation, its ok if you leave a gap, but then you'll be making a sail!

QUOTE (Svensksmith @ 22.Feb.2013, 08:47 PM) *
I only stack the wood as it saves space and it looks a little neater. I saw the most meticulously firewood stacks when I lived in Sweden. Mine never end up that way. Figure I ... (show full quote)

Chainsaw, hand piled, tractored to processing place, chainsaw some to 1m lengths, cut to logs, larger ones split and thrown in. 5 or 6. The pile is right next to the circular cutter, the smaller logs drop into a barrow and are shifted inside, the splitter is just inside the wood shed. So the smaller the wood, the nearer its final resting place. Minimum lifting and throwing etc.
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