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Missing Irish Sausages

Can someone suggest an alternative

Kegzmc
post 7.Jan.2013, 09:26 PM
Post #1
Joined: 17.Jul.2012

Tja,

For the most part I find Swedish food ok, nothing special but ok. The one thing I really miss from time to time is Irish sausages.

For the amount of sausages on display in Sweden I can't find one that I like and have pretty much giving up as they all taste the same.

Has anyone any suggestions?
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jdmufc
post 7.Jan.2013, 09:45 PM
Post #2
Joined: 21.Jan.2010

http://www.taylors.se/
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oddsock
post 7.Jan.2013, 09:45 PM
Post #3
Joined: 19.Dec.2008

Try a market or a charkuteri. They might have spicier sausages that have some flavour to them.

The average korv tastes of pretty much nothing, you have that much right.
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Mo
post 7.Jan.2013, 10:06 PM
Post #4
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

try Nuremburger bratwurst from Lidl etc - only small but tasty and more meat that your average korv
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Pursuivant
post 8.Jan.2013, 11:48 AM
Post #5
Joined: 12.Aug.2008

I'd thought you'd be pining for Barry's tea wink.gif Yeah, finding "raw" sausage is a challenge. You need to go to a market hall.
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Hisingen
post 8.Jan.2013, 02:36 PM
Post #6
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

And when you look at the list of ingredients you see - - - sugar.

No doubt, too, since it is virtually impossible now to buy hearts and kidneys, you get them in the various forms of korv.

Not having had the pleasure of an irish banger, I must say that I still miss an English one. Unfortunately I live too far from the few 'Purveyors of English Suasages' to be able to acquire same, so there is a lack of bangers and bacon, or sausage and mash on my meal table.
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Gordy
post 8.Jan.2013, 04:10 PM
Post #7
Location: Skåne
Joined: 1.Oct.2005

There is a big thread on here somewhere about making your own sausages.

Google will find you various recipes for Irish sausages or you can buy seasoning mix, not sure how authentic the flavour is though.

It's the one thing I also miss, a big fry up of sausages and rashers. I did find back rashers in my local Willys once but I have never seen them there since, I make do with the "normal" ones here for occasional rasher sandwiches.
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Hisingen
post 8.Jan.2013, 04:54 PM
Post #8
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

QUOTE (Gordy @ 8.Jan.2013, 04:10 PM) *
- - -It's the one thing I also miss, a big fry up of sausages and rashers. I did find back rashers in my local Willys once but I have never seen them there since, I make d ... (show full quote)

Back rashers can be found - Scan I believe, calling them Butchers Special or something like that. They are, however, still as wafer thin as is so typical. In all my years here, I have never seen a bacon slicing machine anywhere near the counter where you can determine how thick you want the slices.
I can remember as a 'butcher's boy' during the war slicing bacon for customers within the limits of the ration, and of the butcher himself making sausages for a nearby transport café for whom he had the contract. never in your life have you ever seen such anaemic sausages well laced with pepper - for flavour. What he gained from the lack of meat in them was gained by the customers in the village in 'that little extra'.
But thick slices of bacon, back or otherwise - and gammon slices - are simply not on the menu I fear, neither are the raw sausage to which the OP referred. Finding the equivalent to an ordinary butcher's shop is nigh on impossible. Some stores do have a counter for non pre-packed meat, but it does not compare in any way to the traditional butcher's shop..
The attached photo shows my great grandfather, axe in hand, outside his shop in Reigate, so I do know a wee bit about the trade.

Attached Image
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Gordy
post 8.Jan.2013, 06:40 PM
Post #9
Location: Skåne
Joined: 1.Oct.2005

QUOTE (Hisingen @ 8.Jan.2013, 04:54 PM) *
Back rashers can be found - Scan I believe, calling them Butchers Special or something like that. They are, however, still as wafer thin as is so typical.

I can't remember the brand name but they were Danish and labelled just as "Back bacon" I think, they were a reasonable thickness but ridiculously expensive so it has been more out of fear for my wallet than anything else that I have not tried too hard to find them again!
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Hisingen
post 8.Jan.2013, 07:52 PM
Post #10
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

Yes, it is a pity, but trying to find 'real bacon' is like looking for a needle in the proverbial haystack.
The Butcher's special or whatever, is a recent introduction, and of course - more expensive! I have given up hope of ever finding 'real bacon' of suitable thickness here, and it hasn't been from want of trying.
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beefpatty
post 8.Jan.2013, 07:58 PM
Post #11
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 3.Feb.2011

Tulip do back bacon and it is not that expensive. You will find it in Coop Forum stores.

Taylors for sausages every time. They do stock in stores around Stockholm as well.
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Hisingen
post 8.Jan.2013, 08:17 PM
Post #12
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

Yep, have seen Tulip.
As with almost all Danish bacon, put it in the pan and soon it is swimming - they feed their pigs with masses of liquid.
Unfortunately Taylors are in Stockholm and although they seem to supply by post, living on the west coast, means a fairly long delay out of the fridge, added to the fact their bangers cost a fortune.
At a guess, I might try getting the materials as mentioned in an earlier post, and have a go at making my own. I've made them in the past when I was the butcher's boy, but that was way back in time.
We do have a Kenwood Mixer, however, that has the necessary nozzle for filling then bangers. Just need to get the extra filling materials and skins, so with that address I might try my luck.
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BeccaM
post 8.Jan.2013, 08:42 PM
Post #13
Joined: 3.Sep.2011

I also experienced the same issues with food when I moved here from New England. Almost every restaurant has the same exact foods on the menu. There is little variety. For almost every food I missed from home I have had to look up recipes on the internet to try to make my own (even sausage...I just make it without casings). They do have a very nice thick cut bacon (I think they call it stek flask...or something like that) at City Gross market. Good luck!! Also, I'm not sure where you are located...but in Malmo at the British Store, I think they have imported Irish sausage in the freezer there.
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entry
post 9.Jan.2013, 07:24 AM
Post #14
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 1.Jul.2007

Here in Sweden for some reason I eat less herring. I guess I ate a lot of herring back in the USA. I pretty much make all of our food from scratch. My diet is no different over the years when comparing what I ate in the USA and what we eat here in Sweden.

Janssons frestelse ("Jansson's temptation") I have altered so that it has flavor and named my version Valhalla's Revenge. (Surprisingly, a number of Swedes are able to adjust and even welcome the thought of food having flavor.) Basically, I just use a deeper dish, add horseradish/pepperroot, bread crumbs, and grated cheese to the layers of the traditional Janssons frestelse recipe.

Although I am not Irish, my family always celebrated St. Paddy's Day with Corned Beef & Cabbage. However other than the SPAM like tins of Corned Beef there is no corned beef to be had anywhere around my home. So, no problem. We buy a few briskets, make up the corned Beef brine and allocate a fairly large portion of refrigerator shelf space for the better part of the month for it to pickle. It works out great but not quite like the commercially purchased corned beef that I was raised on. I think it has more to do with the cut/quality of the brisket that I have been using but it still tasted great.

Italian sausages are no where to be found here in my area of Sweden. No problem because they really are not that hard to make yourself. ICA can sell you the skins and you can make them yourself. I imagine that you can also make Irish sausages suited to your taste. Freeze some for later and eat some before you even clean the kitchen.

You can pretty much eat just like you did back home but you may have to work for it.

Good luck, -Paul
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