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Early Retirement From UK to Norrbottens Län

Pension, taxes and medical insurance

hetty
post 9.Jan.2013, 11:55 PM
Post #31
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

rolopolo
We have probably walked passed each other in Dollar Store at some time!!

To the OP. Some time ago I read on this forum that UK pensions were taxable in this country also. With that in mind, when I received my tax form, I visited the local skatteverkett office to discuss it with them. I was told that as I paid tax in the UK on my pension I did not have to declare it on my form - that is just my experience, obviously everybodys circumstances are different. I sincerely wish all the very best and hope you find exactly what you are looking for.
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Pursuivant
post 10.Jan.2013, 11:39 AM
Post #32
Joined: 12.Aug.2008

Taxing pensions depends totally on the tax agreement between country X and country Y. Theres no one rule - you have to dig the exact one. Skatteverket knows them so if you are unsure - go and ask.
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Diefenbaker
post 10.Jan.2013, 08:20 PM
Post #33
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

Thank you for your info' on the tax situation, if these things stay the same for the next 5 years then I'll have a bit more money than expected. I'd been lead to believe that tax was payable on the whole amount and I'd have to pay the swedish tax office some money after I'd paid the UK tax so I'm glad I asked on the forum and not relied on what I'd been told in the church in London.

Thank you to everyone that's replied.

PS. Hetty, I'd love to hear about your experiences when you moved to Sweden, I've just got to work out how to send a private message to get your contact details.
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rolopolo
post 10.Jan.2013, 09:21 PM
Post #34
Joined: 27.Jun.2009

Hetty

I love the dollar store - proves there are some bargains in Sweden - listen out for me in there in mid Feb ! and if you need any t-bags or marmite ! let me know - we drive out as we bring our dog so plenty of room for groceries !!

Rolopolo
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Lingonberry
post 10.Jan.2013, 10:30 PM
Post #35
Joined: 10.May.2007

I've been reading your post and everyone's answers with interest, so I thought I would join in. No, it's not a pipedream. I bought a one bedroom flat in Varmland for about £11,000 in the summer of 2010. It was about £300 a month for the service charge, which included the heating and the water supply. The electricity was a bit expensive and I did find basic food more expensive, things like milk and bread and bananas in some shops but Lidl was a bit cheaper. It was a constant 23 degrees inside my flat even though it was -12 outside at times, I had an outside thermometer. It had triple glazing and very thick walls, and a very pleasant view of a pedestrianised street and 3 windows of a florist opposite. The way flats are run is much better than in the UK. There were regular meetings and everyone was willing to work together to maintain standards and help each other.

I can't help with your tax question as I only stayed at my flat for a few weeks at a time, so I never registered for a person number. I went back to England a few times to fetch another suitcase full of my things, and to make sure that my place in England was ok, and then a sick relative needed help, so unfortunately in the end I decided not to sell my place in England and that I would have to postpone my dream for a few more years, so I sold the flat in Sweden again. But it was a good experience operating a Swedish bank account online, shopping, setting up home (the loppis sales were useful) and practising my Swedish. I did lots of exploring and witnessed the various celebrations for Walpurgis, National Day, Midsummer, All Hallows etc There were Spring, Autumn and Christmas markets and concerts in the Church. I even went to a Fashion Show in an old people's home and to afternoon talks on various topics (non religious) at the Salvation Army.

I don't think your should worry about moving to Sweden on your own - you would be no more on your own than in this country. Every day was an adventure for me - trying out my Swedish, trying to find what I needed in the shops, travelling somewhere by bus or train. As regards health care - it is going from bad to worse in this country, and even if it costs you more in Sweden, you will get better care. They also look after their old people better.

I was interested in your post, because I have the same dream. I've been very fond of Sweden and Finland for many years. I can't stand hot countries and would love to live somewhere where I could see the stars better. I would also like a garden which you don't get with a flat. I intend to give it another go in a couple of years time as I now need to help my son set up his own business before I set off again. I'm also thinking about Luleå, Piteå or Umeå as the further north you are the more chance of seeing the aurora and those are 3 places I haven't managed to get to yet, so I have a lot more exploring to do. Östersund and Mora are very nice too.

Can you help me with this question? Is the Swedish Church in London in the same area as the Finnish and Norwegian Churches - I went to the Christmas Fairs that they had this year, but I didn't see a Swedish Church.

I'm still not clear myself about the tax situation on pensions. There have been other posts in the past and often contradictory information. I came to the conclusion that we did have to pay the difference between the tax rate currently 20% in the UK and whatever it is in Sweden, which is not good news, but I would rather be poor in Sweden than a bit better off in the UK. And I would rather have snow than this terrible rain we keep getting here.

Good luck with your dream. Lycka till.
If you haven't already discovered this, you just click on the person's username and you will see how to send a message.
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hetty
post 10.Jan.2013, 11:35 PM
Post #36
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

rolopolo

I have sent you a message.
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Diefenbaker
post 11.Jan.2013, 07:37 AM
Post #37
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

Lingonberry

Thanks for your encouragement. The Swedish Church is in the north of London, near Marylebone Station. The address is Harcourt St, London W1H 4AG. I haven't been to the other churches although until recently there was a Swedish Seaman's Church in their vicinity but it was sold back in October and is now part of the Danish YWCA.

It's a great way of meeting people and the building itself is open every day until 5pm and they have a small cafe and nice seating area with Swedish newspapers and magazines and even sell secondhand books for just 1 pound. I've become a member so I also have access to their book and video library. The vicar, his wife and the chaplain are very welcoming and the Swedish volunteers in the cafe too. After the service on Sundays most people go downstairs to the cafe for Fika and they're easy to talk to. There's also a Swedish pub 100m away, The Harcourt.

If you're ever in the area drop in, just ring the doorbell to the door on the right of the main church door. Or go to one of the services on Sunday which start at 11am and obviously, they're in Swedish. There is an inledning (order of service) which helps you to follow what's going on and even a small book which has an English translation of the inledning.

Good luck with your plans too.
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Essingen
post 11.Jan.2013, 10:08 AM
Post #38
Joined: 2.Nov.2008

QUOTE
I came to the conclusion that we did have to pay the difference between the tax rate currently 20% in the UK and whatever it is in Sweden, which is not good news, but I would rather be poor in Sweden than a bit better off in the UK.

I believe that your conclusion is the correct one, unless it relates to a "government pension".
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skogsbo
post 11.Jan.2013, 10:43 AM
Post #39
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

Given that productive farm land or forest can easily retail for 100,000kr per hectare I doubt he'd get much with his current plan. forest is a long investment, best bought when young. Better to buy the smallest house you can fit in, that's has good access year round, been reasonably well maintained etc..
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skogsbo
post 11.Jan.2013, 10:45 AM
Post #40
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (Essingen @ 11.Jan.2013, 10:08 AM) *
I believe that your conclusion is the correct one, unless it relates to a "government pension".

I agree, also if permanently in Sweden, all tax paid here, not split between.
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Lingonberry
post 11.Jan.2013, 02:20 PM
Post #41
Joined: 10.May.2007

So can someone tell us the current rate of tax on occupational pensions please?

No tax on government pensions in Sweden is effectively the same as in the UK, because here they always make the personal allowance about the same as the basic state pension, so we don't pay tax on that here either.
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Lingonberry
post 11.Jan.2013, 02:23 PM
Post #42
Joined: 10.May.2007

To Diefenbaker

Thanks for your reply about the Swedish Church - it would be interesting to go one day. I'll work out how to get there.
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hetty
post 11.Jan.2013, 05:41 PM
Post #43
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

Diefenbaker

To send a private message just click on the person's user name when you are logged in, then click on send message. I have just sent you a message giving you my email address anyway. When you are logged in, you will see the heading 'new messages' near the top of the page, that will open up your messages. I think I have that right!!
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