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Schools in Stockholm for English 7 yr old

Help please

Kaw10
post 29.Jan.2013, 02:48 PM
Post #1
Joined: 29.Jan.2013

I hope anyone can help me. I am wanting to move to Stockholm to be with my partner as the distance is just so hard. I am hoping someone can advise me of how I go about enrolling my daughter into a school and what schools are available. Obviously she is British and speak English only. We are both undertaking a home learning course to kick start basic understanding of Swedish.
I will be working and so is my partner if that makes any difference.
Any advise on the transition or any other advise would be most welcomed.
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Puffin
post 29.Jan.2013, 03:34 PM
Post #2
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

What are you looking for in terms of education - are you here for good or temporary?

Basically there are 3 types of school

1. International schools - fee paying where the curriculm is taught in English (such as the British Primary school) however sometimes later on at secondary level it may be difficult to have all options of further/higher education open as some children do not take Swedish exams (like GCSE/A-level) and some schools mainly cater for temporary residents (not all)

2. Bilingual Free schools - independently run schools that teach 50% in English and Swedish but follow the Swedish National Curriculum - no fees t ex IES, Vittra, Kunskapsskolan

3. State schools - most subjects taught in Swedish but often support/mother tongue lessons available

There is information on Stockholms website if you click on the translate tool in the top right corner you can also google schools
http://www.stockholm.se/ForskolaSkola/
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Kaw10
post 29.Jan.2013, 04:15 PM
Post #3
Joined: 29.Jan.2013

I'm hoping it will be a permanent move. Thank you for that. Are there criteria that my daughter would need to fit into? Any tests or basic Swedish language skills she would need?
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byke
post 30.Jan.2013, 11:12 AM
Post #4
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

Personally I would recommend private international schooling until she is 10.

In regards to tests of Swedish language, no there are no tests.
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Timepiece
post 30.Jan.2013, 11:21 AM
Post #5
Joined: 7.Nov.2012

Hi,

We have just moved to Stockholm, and are enrolling our english only speaking 5 year old son in a bilingual free school for a couple of reasons. Mostly because we want him to learn Swedish and integrate with local kids and families. Also, the British Primary School is 95000 SEK per year.

I'd be happy to talk over PM as we are evaluating our options etc too.
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Mo
post 30.Jan.2013, 11:54 AM
Post #6
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

http://sweden.usembassy.gov/consulate/acs13_3.html
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Opalnera
post 30.Jan.2013, 03:20 PM
Post #7
Joined: 16.Aug.2010

Well it depends on how long you plan on being here for.

If the move is permanent I would put your child straight into an ordinary Swedish school and enroll in mother tongue support to keep up the English. The kommun should also provide a "handledare" (mentor) who speaks English and Swedish to help with settling in. At 7 years of age he/she will pick up Swedish within about 3-6 months. Talk to the schools in the area to find out if any of them have another English speaking kid the same age to avoid any social issues. There are kids who speak English in nearly every school, especially in Stockholm. They start school a year later here, so you don't have to worry about falling behind.

Otherwise, if you think you will be going back to the UK the international schools that teach half in Swedish and half in English are the way to go. There are lots around Stockholm, Internationella Engelska Skolan have a few locations.
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Kaw10
post 30.Jan.2013, 08:23 PM
Post #8
Joined: 29.Jan.2013

This is all extremely helpful. I have looked at a few job offers but I am tempted to just try and get part time bar or cafe work so that I am here to help the transition with my daughter. How plausible is this?
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Opalnera
post 31.Jan.2013, 08:38 AM
Post #9
Joined: 16.Aug.2010

There is a lot of competition for that kind of work and without Swedish language skills you are at a disadvantage. You could try the English pubs or restaurants in tourist areas. If you are skilled in anything you should try to get work in your field. If you are educated in any way try to get a teaching job, at the moment you don't have to have a teaching qualification to teach in Sweden. Or there is also the English daycare centres who are always hiring, but as I understand it some of them don't treat their staff very well.
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skogsbo
post 31.Jan.2013, 08:48 AM
Post #10
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

The only thing I would agree with there is that you said there was a lot of competition.

Sweden needs teachers, yes, but the biggest demand is for qualfied science teachers. Not for assistants who don't speak Swedish.
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Opalnera
post 31.Jan.2013, 11:57 AM
Post #11
Joined: 16.Aug.2010

Here is the first lesson in advice from The Local, take everything with a grain of salt. What works for one person doesn't necessarily work for another. Just try all the suggestions and hopefully one will work for you...and try not to let people's negativity get to you.
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skogsbo
post 31.Jan.2013, 12:03 PM
Post #12
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (Opalnera @ 31.Jan.2013, 11:57 AM) *
and try not to let people's negativity get to you.

not being negative, I'm probably more positive about everything here in Sweden, than most people posting on this site. But, telling people there are jobs that they can walk into in teaching and in nurseries, even though they don't speak EDIT "swedish" or have any recognisable teaching qualifications is a lie, at best very misleading.

Feel free to link some of the job adverts to prove me wrong.
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agw9262
post 31.Jan.2013, 12:19 PM
Post #13
Location: Linköping
Joined: 18.Oct.2011

We moved here at the start of 2012, my daughter was 7 at the time.

After consideration, we decided to put her straight into a Swedish state school. she entered into Grade 2 so is actually in a class above what she should have been but her academic level from being in the UK school system since 4 was slightly higher than Grade 2 capabilities.

We have now been here a year and my daughter speaks excellent Swedish and interacts well at school, she is doing very well in her studies even though some of the systems are slightly different to her experience in the UK.

I would still choose the state school again but if I could do it again, knowing what I know now, i would interact with the school rektor prior to her starting at the school to ensure they get the funding and support in place to get the mentor (mentioned above) in place before she starts school.

She went to the school in February 2012 but due to resources did not have the mentor until after the Summer and I think that caused a problem initially. Just as an additional point, we chose the state school as we plan to stay here and wanted her to build proper relationships which children in the local community which would be lasting.
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Opalnera
post 31.Jan.2013, 12:45 PM
Post #14
Joined: 16.Aug.2010

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 31.Jan.2013, 12:03 PM) *
not being negative, I'm probably more positive about everything here in Sweden, than most people posting on this site. But, telling people there are jobs that they can wal ... (show full quote)

I did not suggest that anyone could "walk into" any kind of job, but they are some options she can try. I worked as a teacher for 2 years before I started my teacher training and I know a number of English speakers with no teacher qualifications who are working as teachers. I even know a number of other language speakers with no teacher training who are working in daycare or as hemspråk teachers. It's purely based on my own experience. There are no job ads saying "job - no qualifications or experience necessary" you have to apply for anything and everything you can and if you send out 100 CVs and get only 1 response then you are better off than if you sent out no CVs. Having said that, the laws are changing in 2015 and you will need a recognised teacher qualification and high school level Swedish to get teacher legitimation so many schools are trying to get qualified teachers.
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Kaw10
post 31.Jan.2013, 02:21 PM
Post #15
Joined: 29.Jan.2013

I continuously send cv's out daily so as you say, it is a numbers game.

I really don't want to come to Sweden and be dependent upon anyone. It's a tough call as I worry about my daughter. What happens when you start work before school and finish after school ends? Do you have child care or 'kids clubs' as we call them where children can remain in care after school hours.
Also what school holidays do Sweden operate?
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