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Teachers Salaries in Sweden

Hydro Guy
post 12.Apr.2008, 04:55 AM
Post #1
Joined: 18.Nov.2006

In Canada a primary school teacher (for ages 5 - 12 yrs) with 10 years experience earns the equivalent of between 30,000 and 35,000 kr per month. How does that compare to teachers salaries in Sweden?
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Canadian_cowgirl
post 12.Apr.2008, 08:39 AM
Post #2
Joined: 27.Nov.2007

It depends what type of school you are working in. But, most likely you will start off at apx 25 000 - 28 000. That is based on a teachers contract. If you have a 40hr week contract you pay can be different.
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roch
post 12.Apr.2008, 08:39 AM
Post #3
Joined: 28.Aug.2007

Not even close mate.
Until you have svenska B or Tisus then most school will pay you at unqualified rate.. 19 500. I believe the average is around 23 000.
http://www.scb.se/templates/tableOrChart____28202.asp

The above link is to the Swedish site where it lists average monthly salaries by occupation.

If you are moving to one of the larger cities you might find work in an international school or schools that teach in English.

I moved here in July, have 12 years experience with management roles as well... and basically until I learn the language I will not be able to teach in that age range.
You could also look at teaching English to secondary school level.. but again a lot of schools want you to be able to teach more than one subject..its hit and miss.

I have "lost" 9 months of salary so far this year as I have been studying Swedish.. and while I am progressing well its no where near the level required to be able to teach! Even then once I can I will take over a 50% pay cut compared to what I was earning..
Why? All for love!

So start studying Swedish NOW and save as much as you can before you come over if you are not living in a main centre.
Also when you come over make sure you bring all your original teaching qualifications/relevant degrees and transcripts as they will have to be assessed against the Swedish equivalent. (The place that does this took 7 months to do mine!!!!!)

Its unfortunate... but teaching here is very badly paid compared to other countries. In fact you can probably earn more at McDonald's. Sad but true.
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Streja
post 12.Apr.2008, 11:53 AM
Post #4
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

Roch is right...

It does not start at that either but more like 20 000 depedning on what year you teach.
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Streja
post 12.Apr.2008, 11:54 AM
Post #5
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

QUOTE (Canadian_cowgirl)
It depends what type of school you are working in. But, most likely you will start off at apx 25 000 - 28 000. That is based on a teachers contract. If you have a 40hr week contract you pay can be different.


Do you work as a teacher in Sweden? If you do how come you get so much?
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Canadian_cowgirl
post 12.Apr.2008, 01:34 PM
Post #6
Joined: 27.Nov.2007

I do work as a English Teacher in Stockholm and do not speak Swedish. In Stockholm there are a lot of English schools that look for qualified English teachers. I also have friends from Canada and the USA who teach and make around the same.
Most likely when you first start at a school your salary will be around 22 000, if it is your first job in Sweden. Once you have experience in Sweden your salary will be increased.
All of this is based on my experience and other teachers I know.
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Streja
post 12.Apr.2008, 01:43 PM
Post #7
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

Perhaps it is more in Stockholm, but not really true elsewhere.
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Boston1
post 12.Apr.2008, 02:21 PM
Post #8
Joined: 5.Mar.2006

Well Streja,
To work in a field that is so underpaid, you must be really stupid :wink:
We all know from your posts that the only reason to spend time on something is to be paid appropriately. V. funny that you're a teacher laugh.gif
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Streja
post 12.Apr.2008, 02:24 PM
Post #9
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

No, I said they should be paid full stop. As it is now they work for free...

I don't think you're stupid but you need glasses.
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Boston1
post 12.Apr.2008, 02:29 PM
Post #10
Joined: 5.Mar.2006

By the looks of things you're pretty much working for free too and they're not even your kids.
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roch
post 12.Apr.2008, 02:49 PM
Post #11
Joined: 28.Aug.2007

QUOTE (Streja)
Perhaps it is more in Stockholm, but not really true elsewhere.


Its only true for the "English/international" schools.

Schooling that your ordinary Swedish child attends that is state wide is paid very poorly.

Anyway, I am not here to teach English... as this is my home and teaching was and hopefully still is my profession, I am someone who really wants to learn Swedish to the best level that I can.
It would be good to find a job in the short term to supplement myself while I study.

Streja is a SWEDISH teacher here... not a foreigner teaching English in some school in Stockholm or another large centre. She has experience teaching in the Swedish system.
Basically for the age range that the original poster wrote about and to teach in a normal ordinary school then you do not earn that amount.

If you live in a large city where there are English based schools, then there is more opportunity to teach there.
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Streja
post 12.Apr.2008, 06:11 PM
Post #12
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

QUOTE (Boston1)
By the looks of things you're pretty much working for free too and they're not even your kids.


*sigh*

Not really...I earn more than 20 000 a month but less than 25 000 kr. It's still waaaay more than a housewife. smile.gif Plus all the cooking at home is done by my butler!

smile.gifsmile.gif
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Hydro Guy
post 13.Apr.2008, 01:45 AM
Post #13
Joined: 18.Nov.2006

QUOTE (roch)
Not even close mate.
Until you have svenska B or Tisus then most school will pay you at unqualified rate.. 19 500. I believe the average is around 23 000.
http://www.scb.se/templates/tableOrChart____28202.asp

The above link is to the Swedish site where it lists average monthly salaries by occupation.

If you are moving to one of the larger cities you might find work in an international school or schools that teach in English.

I moved here in July, have 12 years experience with management roles as well... and basically until I learn the language I will not be able to teach in that age range.
You could also look at teaching English to secondary school level.. but again a lot of schools want you to be able to teach more than one subject..its hit and miss.

I have "lost" 9 months of salary so far this year as I have been studying Swedish.. and while I am progressing well its no where near the level required to be able to teach! Even then once I can I will take over a 50% pay cut compared to what I was earning..
Why? All for love!

So start studying Swedish NOW and save as much as you can before you come over if you are not living in a main centre.
Also when you come over make sure you bring all your original teaching qualifications/relevant degrees and transcripts as they will have to be assessed against the Swedish equivalent. (The place that does this took 7 months to do mine!!!!!)

Its unfortunate... but teaching here is very badly paid compared to other countries. In fact you can probably earn more at McDonald's. Sad but true.


Thanks for the heads up. Our situation is a little bit different than yours. I'm an engineer and I'm considering accepting an offer to work for ABB in Västerås. It is my wife who is the teacher. I realize that she will have to pass the TISUS to receive her Swedish teaching certificate, but she does have a bit of a head start. Her parents are Swedish, actually she was born in there too, but they moved to Canada when she was only a year old. Since they spoke the language at home, her conversational Swedish is excellent. Primarily she needs to work on her writing skills, as she has never been formally educated in the language. We are hoping she would be able to pass the TISUS within 3 to 6 months of living over there.

I'm glad to hear that "unqualified" teachers are able to find work, as this may be our sitiuation for the first little bit.

Cheers
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Miss Kitten
post 13.Apr.2008, 09:58 AM
Post #14
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 20.Aug.2007

There are some pretty high paying consultancy jobs out there.

For example, I work as a Business English consultant - which means I'm contracted to teach Business English at various companies - and I make 320:- per hour. Of course I work only part time, but if I did work full time on that salary I'd be making over 50,000:- per month.
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Streja
post 13.Apr.2008, 10:16 AM
Post #15
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

Yeah rub it in will ya! wink.gif

I doubt that you would get work fulltime though hmmm.
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