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what is living in sweden really like?

kiwi84
post 9.Dec.2008, 06:37 PM
Post #1
Joined: 2.Dec.2008

hey , is there any1 who had moved to sweden from new zealand or australia? if so what do you think sweden is really like to live in compared to these countries perhaps,, i am considering moving there, i have only visited lund for 1 month in winter, and to be honest didnt enjoy it 2 much.. any info would be great, cheers michael
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kiwi84
post 9.Dec.2008, 06:40 PM
Post #2
Joined: 2.Dec.2008

come to think about it, any1 who moved to sweden ,, any advice etc would be great
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Michele
post 9.Dec.2008, 06:46 PM
Post #3
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 3.Jun.2005

I've moved here from the US, not your neck of the woods. But I have to say that while I love it about 90% of the time, if you didn't really like it for only one month, it's not really not a wise choice to move here. Winter months are the hardest months for most and there are more OF them than the other sorts of months. On top of that, the visits are usually way better than the reality of day to day.

I'm one of the ones that generally love it here, so it takes a lot for me to say discouraging things about it, but it seems that the people who aren't ALL for the move are the ones I see birtching profusely within a short period of time and wanting to go home. It takes a LOT to make a move of this sort work and work well.

Were I in your shoes, I would give it a couple more visits and if you can't say that you REALLY want to make the move, that you should consider a different plan.
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VikingHumpingWitch
post 9.Dec.2008, 06:54 PM
Post #4
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 21.Dec.2005

It's like malt vinegar. Some people love it, others only have to think of it to start wrinkling their noses and pretending to retch.

Michele gives very good advice up there. Also try the Search Discussion functions for Love AND about AND Sweden, and then hate AND about AND Sweden - should bring up plenty of posts for you to consider.

The easiest thing would be to tell us what you like about life where you are now, and we can tell you how easy or not it will be to get similar in Sweden...
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kiwi84
post 9.Dec.2008, 07:18 PM
Post #5
Joined: 2.Dec.2008

thanks for advice this far,, well i still have 1 more yr of uni bk home and then i guess decide whether to make the move here,, my gf is fm sweden hence why a decision has to be made i guess,, coming from nice sunny weather to they winter here has an effect on the way i feel so far about sweden also , so i know i have 2 take this into consideration.. i like the water, surfing and being in city , stockholm perhaps? ive just noticed a few things here, that may be one off things im not to sure though, like not many people say hi in the streets and people may not be to friendly
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Jasoncarter
post 9.Dec.2008, 07:20 PM
Post #6
Joined: 1.Aug.2006

If you're going to be one of those antipodeans that moves to Sweden and moans constantly about the weather then people probably won't be too friendly, no.
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kiwi84
post 9.Dec.2008, 07:27 PM
Post #7
Joined: 2.Dec.2008

thanks for clarifying my point exactley m8
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Hubris
post 9.Dec.2008, 08:16 PM
Post #8
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 10.Sep.2008

The culture in Sweden is likely rather different than you are used to. I'm from Canada, I don't (yet?) live in Sweden and I'm FAR from an expert, but I have certainly noted some differences from that which I'm familiar. I'm a people watcher...when I walk down the street my head is up, I look far in advance, and often make eye contact...with a nod or a "Hello" if there is any sort of reaction from passers-by. This is not very common in Sweden (at least in Göteborg and area)..people tend to turn their heads down as they come within another's 'comfort range'. This isn't because Swedes are unfriendly...it's because the tradition is different - I think it's a respect for the other person's privacy. I've been told that some Swedes would be made uncomfortable knowing that I pay close attention to the people around me.

There is no way to find out if you are comfortable and can adapt to Swedish traditions other than spending time there. Just because the majority can communicate in English doesn't mean we can apply the social norms from other places in Sweden. If you do some searches in the forum you'll find this topic comes up quite often - making friends in Sweden...whether Swedes are friendly etc. You are not the only person to notice that things are different...because the culture certainly is different. I think Swedes are quite friendly to people they know, but they are more reserved towards strangers than you might see in other places.
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jack sprat
post 9.Dec.2008, 08:55 PM
Post #9
Joined: 15.Sep.2006

In other words if you're looking for a good time forget it.
On the other hand if you fancy living in a country with long hours of Winter darkness,with lots of miserable faces,amongst a population which has most of its actions and thoughts strongly influenced by the state from an early age, with an overall tax burden in the region of 50% and likely to rise and the effects of the recession already biting. Also could mention the price and controls relating to alcohol,the most boring nightlife on the planet...etc.etc...
...but best not to say too much, or you could be accused of whinging and whining. :wink:
If these things and more turn you on, then you will really love it!
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Furu
post 9.Dec.2008, 09:40 PM
Post #10
Joined: 16.Jan.2008

QUOTE (kiwi84)
hey , is there any1 who had moved to sweden from new zealand or australia? if so what do you think sweden is really like to live in compared to these countries perhaps,, i am considering moving there, i have only visited lund for 1 month in winter, and to be honest didnt enjoy it 2 much.. any info would be great, cheers michael


you would not find the sunshine and warm weather of bondi beach, sydney anywhere in Sweden

the lowest it got in sydney in winters was +8 it was the highest it got in umea, sweden in summer during nights.

you got to learn to drive on correct side of the road.

it is less expensive than Sydney to live in Sweden and extremely long day light hours/ dark hours and above all your geography will change by seeing freezing days during your summer months.

above all it is great. make sure you get documentation from Medicare to be able to access free medical in Sweden if you are coming here temporarily.

good luck
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Princess P
post 9.Dec.2008, 09:53 PM
Post #11
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 19.Dec.2006

QUOTE (Furu)
you would not find the sunshine and warm weather of bondi beach, sydney anywhere in Sweden

the lowest it got in sydney in winters was +8 it was the highest it got in umea, sweden in summer during nights.


Wanna bet? This summer it was 38 oC in the shade in my back garden. I dread to think what it was in the sun. And I got sunburnt.

Plus the Swedish lakes don't have sharks in them. Well maybe one. Sometimes. He's too busy wrapping presents at the moment.
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Furu
post 9.Dec.2008, 10:17 PM
Post #12
Joined: 16.Jan.2008

QUOTE (Princess P)
Wanna bet? This summer it was 38 oC in the shade in my back garden. I dread to think what it was in the sun. And I got sunburnt.

Plus the Swedish lakes don't have sharks in them. Well maybe one. Sometimes. He's too busy wrapping presents at the moment.


in july i experience around 22+ one day but that was it

correct no sharks and crocs
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Bones
post 9.Dec.2008, 10:37 PM
Post #13
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 9.Feb.2005

Mate, I'm an Aussie and I've been in Sweden for 5 or so years now. There are also plenty of other Aussies that have been here longer. The fact that we're still here can't mean it's all bad!

I live in Stockholm though, and it seems we don't have a lot of the issues of the smaller towns, but have a few extra issues of our own (housing prices for one). Personally, I love it here. One big reason may be that I've been ready to start a family and this is one of the best places in the world to do it.

I was also stubborn in the early days when my (Swedish) wife was ready to go back Oz, I wanted to stay. (yes, you read right). I have made some of my closet friends here, many of them also Aussie guys that came over for their partners. We have a good mob of us in Stockholm, mostly caught up in the Aussie-rules footy stuff though. If definitely helps having like-minded people in the same situation as you that you can bitch and moan to. It takes the right state of mind to tough it out over here, though and you need to manage your expectations.

I had a wonderfully supportive gf (who became my wife). This is very, very important if you coming over primarily for love. You will go through tough times and you'll both need to be strong about it. You'll also need to keep you dcik in your pants (something easier said than done). I've seen a lot of guys screw things about that way and end up going back home or over to the UK because of it.

A few more things:
• It is expensive here; save up, but don't get depressed when you see you savings disappear after a few nights out. Try to get connections for jobs before you leave.
• Start trying to learn Swedish. Granted, anyone under 50 here speaks great Swedish, but don't be so arrogant to expect to survive on English alone.
• The weather is downright depressing at times, but look on the bright side, when the snow falls, you can do a lot of skiing and snowboarding!
• Come over expecting things to be different and treat it as an experience; don't try to change things to how they were back home (I still have probs with this). I've noticed that everything back home looks better when you're away from it, but when you go back for a holiday, you get bitterly disappointed!

Most of all, talk to your gf, and manage your expectations. If you come in the right state of mind, you will learn to love it here, as many of us have.

Cheers,
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Hairdont
post 9.Dec.2008, 11:25 PM
Post #14
Joined: 26.May.2007

There's something about people who put ketchup on their pasta and can't manage to say hello to a stranger. I hope I never learn to be like them. Life is short. There's more to life than Sweden, I heard someone say.

I'll just say what I said from the first month. Sweden is for Swedes, or people who act like them, if they're the right color.
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Puffin
post 9.Dec.2008, 11:25 PM
Post #15
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (Furu)
the lowest it got in sydney in winters was +8 it was the highest it got in umea, sweden in summer during nights.


It was hotter than that a long way north of Umeå in July and early august

If you are talking about late august then this is no longer summer really but the start of autumn

In early June - central Sweden was the hottest place in Europe
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