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Slang and swear words in Swedish and English

What's allowed/appropriate, but keep it clean here

Johno
post 30.Apr.2009, 12:05 PM
Post #1
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

Bee raises this elsewhere and it is relevant to all those learning a new language. What is appropriate and when. I mean it seriously so that the thread does not get deleted. Comments on attitudes and cross culture views are the hoped for responses.

I long ago realised that mastering slang was essential to becoming really fluent, and having started learning Swedish many many years ago, was fascinated as the -is ended slang words became more and more common (loppis, bebis osv) - I know some readers will think these have been around for ever.

Comparing Swedish and English its clear that Swedish is still dominated by religious swear words and English by sexual. Perhaps you all knew that too.

Bee finds the Swedish f word (c word in English) offensive while I have seen it ever increasingly and openly used. Both Beck and Wallander films have recently included the disliked phrase. Curiously the word fanny was used in Extras (Ricky Gervais) and was translated to the f word in Swedish subtitles, shown on evening TV.

And by the way do Swedes really think it ok to title a film F***ing Åmål
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Bee
post 30.Apr.2009, 04:25 PM
Post #2
Joined: 26.Mar.2007

Sorry I said I DID NOT find it offensive!!... I have heard a slang word they use alot up north "PEPP" or "Peppad" but often when I have said it in Stockholm they have not understood..it means to be excited or looking forward to I believe. Jättepeppad
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Johno
post 30.Apr.2009, 04:43 PM
Post #3
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

Sorry, you didnt, I agree, only from

QUOTE
One more point that has bugged me for sometime now..in the swedish section someone has used what could be considered as a highly offensive term for the female reproductive organ (not, I might add, is it offensive to me. Coming from the north of England I find swearing, when used well, adds colour and depth to a conversation).

you think that some might find it highly offensive ! My surprise is that compared with English where its equivalent is the most taboo word, in Swedish from the evidence it definitely aint. (Even though in the Gervais instance in fact a better translation of "fanny" into Swedish might have been mus.)

Having cleared that up, any interesting slang anyone ?
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Braderunner Rennuredarb
post 30.Apr.2009, 04:50 PM
Post #4
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 24.May.2005

I still remember the response I got when calling a "bum bag" a "fanny pack" (the US name for it).

Funneh
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Puffin
post 30.Apr.2009, 04:52 PM
Post #5
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (Bee @ 30.Apr.2009, 05:25 PM) *
Sorry I said I DID NOT find it offensive!!... I have heard a slang word they use alot up north "PEPP" or "Peppad" but often when I have said it in ... (show full quote)


'peppa' is quite an ordinary word

It's in the dictionary and means 'to pep upp' (as in pep talk)
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Bee
post 30.Apr.2009, 04:58 PM
Post #6
Joined: 26.Mar.2007

I think that john lydon (johnny rotten of sex pistols fame) holds the record for saying both the F word and the C word on live tv almost twenty or more years apart. I know that when the Guardian had the C word on the front of g2 there was an outcry. In England it is probably the one swear word left that really has an impact when used. I think it depends which swedes you hang around with..I have used it and witnessed it offence caused. I love a good swear me wink.gif The swedish F word seems to pass Editor Bob, so it cant be that offensive wink.gif
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Bee
post 30.Apr.2009, 05:01 PM
Post #7
Joined: 26.Mar.2007

QUOTE (Puffin @ 30.Apr.2009, 05:52 PM) *
'peppa' is quite an ordinary word. It's in the dictionary and means 'to pep upp' (as in pep talk)

Yes, but they do not use it in the pep talk sense. They use it like..if they are really looking forward to doing something.. Jag är jättepeppad! eller jag ha inga pepp
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Bee
post 30.Apr.2009, 05:21 PM
Post #8
Joined: 26.Mar.2007

I also find it interesting that in England swear words are beeped out of songs or artists record radio edits..in Sweden people complain if they do not play the full, original track and rightly so.
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Plowbridge
post 30.Apr.2009, 05:24 PM
Post #9
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 11.Sep.2008

Editor Bob can't have any family in the music business here.

For the record I like to say Oj Oj Oj.
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 30.Apr.2009, 06:21 PM
Post #10
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

QUOTE (Johno @ 30.Apr.2009, 01:05 PM) *
Comparing Swedish and English its clear that Swedish is still dominated by religious swear words and English by sexual. Perhaps you all knew that too.


Everyday casual swearwords are still religious but sexual swearwords are definitely on the rise. I use kuk and fitta quite often...

The major difference between Sweden and the UK is that there is no censorship of swearwords and that nobody is really offended.
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Bee
post 30.Apr.2009, 09:31 PM
Post #11
Joined: 26.Mar.2007

angry.gif
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Bee
post 30.Apr.2009, 10:17 PM
Post #12
Joined: 26.Mar.2007

QUOTE (Puffin @ 30.Apr.2009, 05:52 PM) *
'peppa' is quite an ordinary word. It's in the dictionary and means 'to pep upp' (as in pep talk)

It feels like you are talking "down" to me. Despite what you might think, you can't know everything!! That's the what's great about slang, it always keeps moving! wink.gif
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Buckshot
post 30.Apr.2009, 11:03 PM
Post #13
Joined: 12.Oct.2007

The word F*tta is offensive in most situations.
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 30.Apr.2009, 11:52 PM
Post #14
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

Yes, it is offensive if you call somebody a fitta, but it is not so offensive that you have to censor it. No swearword is really that offensive... at least not to a Swede...
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kaze
post 1.May.2009, 01:05 AM
Post #15
Joined: 22.Mar.2008

Which Swedish F word is which English C word?
The only two English C words I can think of are quite low grade swearing.
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