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SFI Level D Exam

Does anyone know?

zorror2009
post 6.Dec.2009, 11:40 PM
Post #1
Joined: 6.Dec.2009

Hi, I’m planning to take level D SFI exam next week. Can someone please help me with following questions regarding the exam?
01. Format of the exam paper
02. Any website I could find previous exam papers
03. Pass mark
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kerostarfx
post 7.Dec.2009, 12:34 AM
Post #2
Location: Linköping
Joined: 2.Mar.2008

varsågod!

http://www.skolverket.se/sb/d/2979/a/16818
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zorror2009
post 10.Dec.2009, 10:53 PM
Post #3
Joined: 6.Dec.2009

Thanks!! kerostarfx

But I can’t find any recent past papers in this web site.

Any guidance from someone who did this exam recently would be highly appreciated.
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Puffin
post 11.Dec.2009, 10:55 AM
Post #4
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

I believe that more recent tests are secret under the laws on examination secrecy - I think they may reuse certain questions again
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Tennin
post 11.Dec.2009, 12:47 PM
Post #5
Joined: 4.May.2007

I took SFI D exam a year ago.

Here we did a hearing part, where we had to listen to a tape/CD and answer the questions. If I remember correctly we were allowed to listen to it twice.

Another part of the exam is to read a small pamphlet with each page having a short paragraph, or story, then you have to answer the questions on it.

There was also a writing part, where we had to write 2 pages or so on a certain topic that was listed.

I'm not too sure, it's been alot of other Svenska classes since SFI D for me, but if I remember correctly there was also a small speaking part.

It's pretty much like the other SFI exams, but harder. So if you took SFI B or C the exam follows the same format. I believe you needed a 70% or so to pass the exam.
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Furu
post 13.Dec.2009, 02:49 AM
Post #6
Joined: 16.Jan.2008

How are SFI levels compared with learning Swedish at University.

Thanks
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Puffin
post 13.Dec.2009, 10:15 AM
Post #7
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

It's hard to tell as there are a variety of different courses at University - however if you are talking about a University course leading to TISUS for university entrance that takes about 18 months - SFI D would be the level you reached after around 3-4 months - usually they spend little time on the Uni courses on the basic SFI levels and after the first week or so would be working at an SFI C level as all have an academic background.

TISUS equates to Gymnasiet Svenska B - or grade 12 of the Swedish school system

To do this via the KOMVUX route you need to take several courses:
- SFI D - approx grade 6-7 of the school system (end of primary/middle school)
- SAS Grund/ or GRUV - grade 9 - (GCSE level - the level that 16 year olds have when they leave junior secondary school)
- SAS Gymnasiet or regular gymnasiet courses A & B - year 12 (A level/IB level/ High school leaving level)

Around the fastest that people can do the complete komvux route is 2 years - however 3-5 years is more normal.

Often the TISUS courses are faster because you do nothing else but Swedish all day so you gain the Swedish levels very fast because it is intensive. The TISUS test is also a little easier as much of it is multiple choice as there is not the literature course that makes Svenska B gymnasiet tricky (ie interpreting Ancient Rune stones or writing essays on Chaucer in Swedish).

The Komvux courses are not so intensive and you will usually not have a full timetable just with Swedish - however one advantage is that you can attend other subjects and classes alongside Swedes which may speed up your vocab and comprehension etc - for example to come up to full timetable I took History, Maths and Social Studies which proved invaluable for vocab when I went to University to study social sciences
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Tennin
post 13.Dec.2009, 11:35 AM
Post #8
Joined: 4.May.2007

For some reason the kommun I live in doesn't have or like people to go through SFI in 3 or 4 months, the good students usually takes about 8 months. Only people who were allowed to go through SFI in 4 months were the ones who studied alot of Swedish before hand.

I know other people that took SFI in other kommuns and were done with it in 4 months or so. They said the bad thing about that was they felt they missed out on alot of the fundamental building blocks of the language.
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Puffin
post 13.Dec.2009, 05:10 PM
Post #9
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

The example I was giving was actually answering Furu's question on how SFI compared with the intensive University course that takes you from beginner to TISUS in 12-18 months. On one of these courses you would reach SFI D level in around 3-4 months from beginner but bearing in mind they study around 35-40 hours per week rather than the average 10-15 on SFI.

I know that many kommuns don't like people to go quickly through SFI for whatever reason so they discourage people from getting to SFI in one term. I attended SFI for 11 weeks and was allowed to take the test and passed (not a great mark though) - I think the teacher was shocked - it then transpired that there was no course to go to which was problematic.

One thing that I think Sweden could be better at - and perhaps learn a thing from Denmark (not often I say this) - when I was in Denmark I studied Danish for 1 term - in Denmark you were free to apply to anywhere in the county so you were not restricted to your own kommun - so schools ran differnt types over classes and even at SFI level you could attend a class for graduates even if there was no such class in your kommun
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Furu
post 13.Dec.2009, 11:13 PM
Post #10
Joined: 16.Jan.2008

Thanks Puffin.
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gplusa
post 13.Dec.2009, 11:21 PM
Post #11
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

I wouldn't get hung up on the speed of study issue. I started out like that, knocking out an exam a week. Finish in a couple of months. Then it dawned on me that the whole point of the exercise was to learn about Sweden and Swedish well enough that I could take that knowledge away and use it forever. Not simply retain the knowledge long enough to past a test, which really means nothing. Which is what I had been doing. Because I was trying to learn so much, so quickly, stuff was simply falling out the back as soon as it was no longer needed. Which is not what I wanted to achieve. The course was for my benefit, not for the benefit of teachers or examiners. So I backed off, and took more time to really understand what I was learning, and why I was learning it. It paid off big time as I have the basic building blocks of the language and society firmly planted into me. And strangely enough, I even understand them. Worth keeping in mind what the point of the exercise is and what the rewards are to you, and focusing a little less on the piece of paper.

Yeah, 3 months might give you the world's record, but how much of the course are you really likely to retain at that speed ?
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theteacher
post 3.Sep.2011, 10:32 AM
Post #12
Joined: 2.Jan.2007

Hello!

On the home page www.plugga24.se you can find the biggest collection of complete SFI-tests online.

There are a few different parts in the test:
- reading comprehension
- speaking
- listening comprehension
- writing

Most people fail on the last part, Writing. Visit this page on www.plugga24.se to learn more about common types of texts and genres you need to be able to read and write on the SFI-test.

Good luck!
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theteacher
post 10.Sep.2011, 08:55 PM
Post #13
Joined: 2.Jan.2007

Puffin said "Often the TISUS courses are faster because you do nothing else but Swedish all day so you gain the Swedish levels very fast because it is intensive. The TISUS test is also a little easier as much of it is multiple choice as there is not the literature course that makes Svenska B gymnasiet tricky (ie interpreting Ancient Rune stones or writing essays on Chaucer in Swedish)."

I agree that learning Swedish with a TISUS course, preferably one of the intensive courses arranged by one of the universities, is faster compared to KOMVUX. Often much faster.

However, I don't think it is easier to pass a TISUS test than the tests you would have at a Svenska A and B course. On the contrary, I think the students who pass TISUS in general have a higher level of Swedish. The TISUS tests are demanding.

It is possible to flunk the national tests in the Svenska B, for example, and still get a grade, Godkänt, for the course. This is because the national tests are only meant to help the teacher to set the grades - and in most schools the teachers give the students higher grades than their results in the national tests. (In Swedish: proven är rådgivande, inte tvingande). And teachers who give fair grades often get impopular, not only with the students but also with the principals who fear that the school could become impopular. angry.gif

If you want your children to get top grades - straight MVG:s - put them in a private school, the same as the local politicians choose for their offspring...

For how long will these injustices go on? / www.plugga24.se
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gplusa
post 11.Sep.2011, 03:26 PM
Post #14
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

People making sweeping blanket statements based on little more than hearsay tend to lose credibility rather quickly. Best to try and avoid that. My Svenska B final grade was based ENTIRELY on my external nationella prov exam scores. I had to complete and pass a set number of internal assignments before being allowed to sit the external exams. Which, as Puffin correctly pointed out, were bloody tricky and stretched my Swedish abilities to the max. I think I learnt more Shakespeare during that period than I had learnt in my previous 40+ years. (and Runsvenska had me totally stuffed) But, those assignments did not contribute towards determining my final grade for Svenska B. Maybe they did in other schools, but not at mine. So there's one case for starters.

I don't agree with the notion that the shorter programme course will automatically result in a higher level of understanding of Swedish. I worked full time and studied part time. Which meant it took me more than 2 years to complete through to Svenska B. As a result of having 2 years of actively using the language, my level of Swedish I would venture is more robust than someone who has crammed themselves theough a short term "quick fix" programme. My point is that language is one of the few things that can't, and shouldn't, be rushed through the learning process merely to gain a certificate. 2 or 3 months of "intensive" study isn't going to suddenly make you fluent in a new language. That takes years to achieve. If you don't take the time to get the foundations right, you'll pretty quickly come unstuck in the real world after cramming for the exams. I've seen too many people try to race through these courses only to end up disappointed that it hadn't opened the doors they thought it would.
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uduck
post 16.Sep.2011, 10:23 AM
Post #15
Joined: 19.Oct.2010

QUOTE (kerostarfx @ 6.Dec.2009, 11:34 PM) *

Is this the same for SFI nationelt-prov for C level?
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