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Losing ones citizenship

Passport problems

Case officer
post 17.Jan.2013, 12:58 AM
Post #16
Joined: 25.Jul.2012

QUOTE (oddsock @ 16.Jan.2013, 11:46 PM) *
But I would guess that in your case you would not need any residence time to regain your Swedish citizenship, seeing as you probably easily qualify through your... erm... Swedishness.

A two year residency and a permanent residence permit are two of the requirements: Migrationsverket. As claimed earlier, a residence permit for studying can not be extended to a permanent residence permit.
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openCV
post 17.Jan.2013, 04:18 AM
Post #17
Joined: 16.Jan.2013

How does one get a permanent residence permit?

...from what i could decipher, it seems like you gotta reside in sweden for a time period before being granted a permanent residence permit, but to reside in sweden, you need a residence permit (work and student not counted?)... catch 22??
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openCV
post 17.Jan.2013, 04:42 AM
Post #18
Joined: 16.Jan.2013

How does one get a permanent residence permit?

Wow!! migrationsverket is available in ENGLISH!!! haha... ok so it seems like you gotta reside in sweden for a time period (5 years Continuously) before being granted a permanent residence permit, so my 2 years of study are valid for this correct?, so then need to stay for an additional 3 years, so either phD or get sponsored for work permit... work for three years, then will be eligible for PUT and consequently citizenship since already met the other requirement of "residing in Sweden for 2 years" to regain my citizenship?
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Yorkshireman
post 17.Jan.2013, 08:09 AM
Post #19
Joined: 22.Nov.2011

Study permits cannot be extended to permanent, that has already been mentioned. Students are expected to leave the country once studies are completed. If the intention is to become resident in Sweden after the study time, then the student permit will (should) not be granted.

To get a PUT is as simple! as 2 years on a relationship permit, or 4 years work permit.
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oddsock
post 17.Jan.2013, 12:56 PM
Post #20
Joined: 19.Dec.2008

QUOTE (Case officer @ 17.Jan.2013, 12:51 AM) *
To clarify, the Swedish citizenship was revoked automatically if a Swedish citizen became a citizen of another country. A formal decision by a public authority was not necessary.

Yes, I realise that, but my question was how did the Swedish authorities find out unless you told them?

If you are naturalised by a second country there is no way for Sweden to find out unless you a.) tell them or b.) arrive at Stockholm airport immigration and are silly enough show your other passport by accident.

In Holland second passports aren't allowed, but they've already had multiple government ministers with dual citizenship. It's a law that can't be enforced, not even upon ministers.
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oddsock
post 17.Jan.2013, 01:06 PM
Post #21
Joined: 19.Dec.2008

On another note, I found some interesting info on the Migrationsverket website. If you receive some kind of fine, you have to wait longer to become a Swedish citizen.

QUOTE
Penalty Qualifying period
Fine 30x daily income At least one year after the crime. For example, if you receive a fine 50x your daily income, the qualifying period is calculated as one and a half years.
Fine 60x daily income At least two years after the crime
Fine 100x daily income At least three years after the crime

Yes, it depends on how big the fine is compared to your income. Rich people can commit a crime and still get their citizenship without delay!

This is also quite badass:

QUOTE
If you were born and are resident abroad, there are some circumstances under which you may lose your Swedish citizenship. Here you will find out how you can apply to retain it.
You will lose your Swedish citizenship when you reach the age of 22, if you:

- were born outside of Sweden
- have never lived here and
- have not visited Sweden in circumstances which indicate an attachment to the country.

They take away your Swedish citizenship if you do not show enough devotion to the Swedish folkhem.
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oddsock
post 17.Jan.2013, 01:23 PM
Post #22
Joined: 19.Dec.2008

QUOTE (openCV @ 17.Jan.2013, 04:42 AM) *
How does one get a permanent residence permit?Wow!! migrationsverket is available in ENGLISH!!! haha... ok so it seems like you gotta reside in sweden for ... (show full quote)

After reading the Migrationsverket website, Case Officer is right, it seems that even though one of your parents are Swedish (I assume), that you yourself are born in Sweden, and that you once had Swedish citizenship, you still can't just automatically apply for Swedish citizenship without fulfilling residence requirements. That's insane, because you basically should already be Swedish (well, you would be according to the laws of any other country I have lived in).

You have to live in Sweden for two years. But being a student does not count. Note that a PhD position is also considered being a student and also does not count.

Basically, despite being born in Sweden to a Swedish parent, they still consider you a foreigner. Which is very weiiiird.
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 17.Jan.2013, 02:42 PM
Post #23
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

QUOTE (oddsock @ 17.Jan.2013, 02:23 PM) *
it seems that even though one of your parents are Swedish (I assume), that you yourself are born in Sweden, and that you once had Swedish citizenship, you still can't just ... (show full quote)

I thought you had lived in the Netherlands?

http://www.government.nl/issues/nationalit...tch-nationality
http://www.government.nl/issues/nationalit...-dutch-national
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oddsock
post 17.Jan.2013, 03:09 PM
Post #24
Joined: 19.Dec.2008

You can claim Dutch citizenship by descent. Somebody born in the Netherlands to a Dutch parent can easily reclaim their Dutch citizenship.
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 17.Jan.2013, 03:13 PM
Post #25
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

You still need to fulfill a residence requirement: http://english.ind.nl/residencewizard/verb...r=1&lang=en
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oddsock
post 17.Jan.2013, 04:19 PM
Post #26
Joined: 19.Dec.2008

You have to be legally living in Holland, but there is no minimum number of years attached, you can apply for your citizenship as soon as you arrive. Not as easy as in Ireland, but not as difficult as Sweden, where you have to be resident for two years, and being a student doesn't count.

To OpenCV: is there not a chance that you are still a Swedish citizen? Was your Swedish citizenship actively cancelled or did you simply never renew your Swedish passport? If it is the latter then it is possible that you are still a Swedish citizen, and you just have to contact the Swedish embassy and see if you can apply for a new Swedish passport. You never know, it might be worth a shot. Find your personnummer. You probably have Swedish birth certificate with it on it.
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 17.Jan.2013, 04:52 PM
Post #27
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

QUOTE (oddsock @ 17.Jan.2013, 05:19 PM) *
You have to be legally living in Holland, but there is no minimum number of years attached, you can apply for your citizenship as soon as you arrive. Not as easy as in Ireland ... (show full quote)

In all the requirements listed in the link above you have to have a minimum number of years residence (unless you are a minor):

QUOTE
In addition, you must belong to one of the following categories:

You are of full age, were born in the Netherlands and have lived in the Netherlands, the Netherlands Antilles or Aruba continuously since your birth.
You were born in the Netherlands, the Netherlands Antilles or Aruba, you have lived there for an uninterrupted period of at least 3 years and since your birth you have not had a nationality (you are stateless).
You are of full age and you have legally lived in the Netherlands, the Netherlands Antilles or Aruba since the age of 4.
You are of full age, you are a former Dutch citizen and you have lived in the Netherlands, the Netherlands Antilles or Aruba for at least 1 year on the basis of a permanent residence permit or a residence permit for a non-temporary purpose of residence.
You have been married to a Dutch citizen for at least 3 years and have legally resided in the Netherlands, the Netherlands Antilles or Aruba for an uninterrupted period of at least 15 years.
You are 65 or over and have legally resided in the Netherlands, the Netherlands Antilles or Aruba for an uninterrupted period of at least 15 years.
You are a minor, are acknowledged by a Dutch citizen and have been cared for and brought up by this Dutch citizen for an uninterrupted period of at least 3 years.
You are a minor and, as a result of a Court decision or by law at the time of your birth, are under the joint custody of a non-Dutch father or mother and another person who is a Dutch citizen. Since the start of this custody you have been cared for and brought up by this Dutch citizen for a period of at least 3 years. Since then you have also had your principal place of residence in the Netherlands.
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oddsock
post 17.Jan.2013, 06:23 PM
Post #28
Joined: 19.Dec.2008

I have no idea why you decided to start an argument with me about Dutch citizenship.

But somebody born in Holland to a Dutch parent is automatically Dutch, see here: http://www.government.nl/issues/nationalit...-or-family-ties

And you can apply to reDutchify yourself even when living overseas: http://www.government.nl/issues/nationalit...another-country.

Surely Sweden has similar procedures?
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 17.Jan.2013, 06:30 PM
Post #29
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

QUOTE (oddsock @ 17.Jan.2013, 07:23 PM) *
I have no idea why you decided to start an argument with me about Dutch citizenship.

Because you are so often upset over something without having your facts in order.

QUOTE (oddsock @ 17.Jan.2013, 07:23 PM) *
But somebody born in Holland to a Dutch parent is automatically Dutch, see here: http://www.government.nl/issues/nationalit...-or-family-ties

Yes, and the same holds true for somebody with a Swedish parent, but that was not your original statement. You claimed that regaining lost citizenship did not require residency in any of the countries you have lived, and I clearly showed you that that is not correct, a former Dutch national must show some connection through residence to The Netherlands. Sure, you can apply from abroad, but you still have to quality for any of the residence requirements listed above.
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oddsock
post 17.Jan.2013, 06:34 PM
Post #30
Joined: 19.Dec.2008

The rules you show are those of the option procedure (optieprocedure), they don't apply to naturalisation through descent. Then you don't even have to be living in Holland.

Dutch naturalisation rules:
http://gemeente.leiden.nl/loket/inhoud/pro...-naturalisatie/

QUOTE
2. Oud-Nederlanders

Als u de Nederlandse nationaliteit bezat en deze heeft verloren, geldt geen eis om een bepaalde periode in Nederland te hebben gewoond. U kunt uw verzoek vanuit het buitenland indienen.

Google Translate is your friend. But so am I, so I will translate it for you: It says that the residence requirements do not apply to former Dutch citizens who wish to reacquire their Dutchness.
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