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Question about the Skånsk dialect?

Can people in Stockholm understand Skånsk?

mc87
post 2.Feb.2010, 11:13 AM
Post #1
Location: Skåne
Joined: 13.Jan.2010

What is the main difference between Skånsk (Swedish Dialect from Skåne) and standard Swedish (‘Rikssvenska’)? Is the Skånsk dialect understood throughout Sweden?

The reason I ask is twofold:-

  • First, I am ‘attempting’ to learn Swedish in Skåne but eventually want to move to, and be understood, in Stockholm; and
  • Second, I have travelled to Stockholm with friends who were born and raised in Skåne and I am curious as to why the ‘Stockholmers’ immediately switched to English when they were confronted with Skånsk? Was this because they could not understand Skånsk?


And out of curiosity: is Skånsk understood by Danish people?
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007
post 2.Feb.2010, 11:24 AM
Post #2
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

skånska is pure swedish with an accent different from the accent in stockholm or gothenburg or wherever else in sweden .

there are many regional terms but nothing that really impedes any other swede from understanding since you'd learn standard swedish and not the slang in your lessons i.e. potatisar and not pantofflor for potatoes

i've never once experienced a stockholmer switching to english when speaking with someone from/in skåne (i'm there every summer). i have experienced swedes switching to enlgish when confronted with danish. perhaps you're mixing them up.
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Freja
post 2.Feb.2010, 11:40 AM
Post #3
Joined: 27.Jan.2010

Context/disclosure: I'm from Stockholm. Some of my best friends are Skåningar and we speak Swedish (i.e. Stockholmska and Skånska) with each other.

Skånska is probably one of the most difficult dialects for an average Stockholmer to understand. In close competition with Gotländska.

Anyone from Stockholm will however, albeit with a bit of effort, understand a Skåning. However, some Skåningar with very heavy/thick dialect (and it varies considerably within Skåne also) can be VERY difficult to get, and the easy/lazy option then is to switch to English. It also helps to deal with some local/regional attitudes/steretyping as English becomes a neutral territory. Not sure if it is a one-way challenge or if Skåningar can have the same problem with Stockholmska. I have the impression that if they have any issue it is more of an attitude towards people from Stockholm (being the capital), and not really the dialect, althouth some Stockholm slang/idiomactic expressions (which can be a bit peculiar) are sometimes neither understood or appreciated from Skåningar and other non-Stockholmers.

If I were you I wouldn't worry too much as long as your tutor/teacher and the people that will be involved in your language development haven't got a very heavy/thick Skånska.

I certainly have the impression that the Danes have it much easier to understand a heavily accented Skåning than what the average Stockholmer does. In my ears Skånska and Danska sounds very similar, although in terms of structure/grammar/vocabulary they are distinct. It is more the way words are pronounced and the sounds that make them appear similar/same.

With a Dane I definitly prefer English, but would get by in Swedish/Danish if we didn't have the conveniency of both countries being bilingual to a large extent. Again English becomes a neutral platform where we can communicate with the same handicaps/profficiency. And it could also help deal with some Danish/Swedish brotherly/systerly love/animosity as, again, we are on neutral territory.
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swozzie
post 2.Feb.2010, 11:41 AM
Post #4
Joined: 8.Oct.2009

For me the skånsk dialect is comparable to standard British English vs. Glaswegian in terms of having to attune ones ear to the sound of it.
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mc87
post 2.Feb.2010, 12:02 PM
Post #5
Location: Skåne
Joined: 13.Jan.2010

Thank you for your contribution 007.

QUOTE (7 @ 2.Feb.2010, 11:24 AM) *
since you'd learn standard swedish and not the slang in your lessons i.e. potatisar and not pantofflor for potatoes

Good point, however I am currently on the waiting list for the official swedish course and am therefore learning Swedish from the 'streets', and my Skånish friends. In other words I am learning the dialect. Moreover, I have already completed an intense Swedish course in Malmo where the teacher told 'us' from the start that she was teaching Skånsk.

QUOTE (7 @ 2.Feb.2010, 11:24 AM) *
perhaps you're mixing them up.

In lieu of my post (e.g. my friends speaking...), I think that your comments are unfounded. In any case I live on the Danish/Swedish boarder - where do you live?
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mc87
post 2.Feb.2010, 12:10 PM
Post #6
Location: Skåne
Joined: 13.Jan.2010

Thank you heaps Freja. I think you 'hit the nail on the head'.

QUOTE (Freja @ 2.Feb.2010, 11:40 AM) *
local/regional attitudes/steretyping


Although I am not fully aware (or naive too) the different attitudes/sterotypes..
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007
post 2.Feb.2010, 12:19 PM
Post #7
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

QUOTE (mc87 @ 2.Feb.2010, 12:02 PM) *
Moreover, I have already completed an intense Swedish course in Malmo where the teacher told 'us' from the start that she was teaching Skånsk.

she's probably referring to the pronunciation but never a bad idea to be introduced to the vernacular. when i was learning swedish i was a bit frustrated that we learned standard swedish but everyone i spoke to added in slang e.g. bägge v. båda, käka (sp?) v. äta etc. i wouldn't worry about it since you're learning swedish albeit in skåne.

QUOTE (mc87 @ 2.Feb.2010, 12:02 PM) *
In lieu of my post (e.g. my friends speaking...),

not sure what you mean...instead of your post (for example my friends speaking) ?

QUOTE (mc87 @ 2.Feb.2010, 12:02 PM) *
I think that your comments are unfounded.

a suggestive query isn't a comment and as it bears no conclusion nor judgment it's confusing that you're calling them unfounded (since...well...they're not accusing anyone of anything)

QUOTE (mc87 @ 2.Feb.2010, 12:02 PM) *
In any case I live on the Danish/Swedish boarder - where do you live?

i'm not telling though i know you live in malmö wink.gif
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Awaydays
post 2.Feb.2010, 12:36 PM
Post #8
Joined: 2.Feb.2010

The Glasgow comparison is pretty spot on. Not only for describing the language difference but also for the strong sense of regional identity. I reckon most people in Skåne see Copenhagen as their "real" capital and a fair few would also rather belong to Denmark than Sweden.

Skånska is basically an Eastern Danish accent spoken with Swedish words. Listen to Bornholmsk and you´ll notice how similar they are. However, most people in the Copenhagen area find Rikssvenska easier to understand, simply because that´s what they hear in SVT programmes - which is just about the only Swedish most danes ever hear on a regular basis. Learning Skånska will make it easier for you to understand Danish though.

Unless you learn Skånska from dockers there´s no need to worry. The written language is svenska and nearly everyone in Sweden will understand Skånska unless you speak with a really, really heavy accent (which I´d be well impressed if you as a foreigner would manage to pick up). I´ve never heard of anyone having problems understanding people like Leif Silbersky or Hans Alfredsson.
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mc87
post 2.Feb.2010, 12:51 PM
Post #9
Location: Skåne
Joined: 13.Jan.2010

Haha, sorry bad expression.
What I meant to say was: rather than "actually" reading my post (e.g. the people I went to Stockholm with were born in Skåne - communicating in Skånsk) you made a "suggestive query" that they (my friends from Skåne) could have been speaking Danish in Stockholm?

In this context, I disagree with your claim that the "suggestive query" makes no "judgement". It could easily be intepreted as an implicit statement (e.g. that I don't understand the difference between Danish and Swedish).

In any case, I am sorry if there was a misunderstanding.
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007
post 2.Feb.2010, 01:22 PM
Post #10
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

sorry, didn't mean anything other than suggesting one plausible explanation to something i find quite remarkable (and i know nothing of your ability in swedish, nor do i presume anything) no harm no foul smile.gif

my MIL is from skåne which is why i'm there a lot and never have i hear noll-åttor and skåningar use english as a more commonly understandable language (though once in simrishamn the swede, despite being a ½skånksk, was as lost as i to what some people said to us while passing by)
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