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Misrepresented house details

House purchase details wrong

Puffin
post 29.Jan.2012, 09:35 PM
Post #16
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (lewis_rj @ 29.Jan.2012, 09:26 PM) *
No additional survey. But surely that's not the point? Can't you reply on what is written in the sales particulars? I'd be happy with an agreement to cover the cos ... (show full quote)

What do you mean - "no additional survey"? - you realise that buyers in Sweden have the duty to inspect and survey?
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007
post 29.Jan.2012, 09:57 PM
Post #17
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

i'd say you have a case to make them stick by the contract at their cost. insist upon it.
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mångk
post 29.Jan.2012, 09:59 PM
Post #18
Joined: 27.Jul.2008

What Puffin said!

How do you know that there are no defects in the property?

A survey should be done by the purchaser.

I would find out if there is room to have a survey done before the completion date.
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mångk
post 29.Jan.2012, 10:07 PM
Post #19
Joined: 27.Jul.2008

Here is a handy website for those thinking about purchasing a property.

http://kopa-hus.se/besiktning.html

It is in Swedish though.
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mångk
post 29.Jan.2012, 10:09 PM
Post #20
Joined: 27.Jul.2008

OP

Here is a link for you to ask your question to a lawyer/expert.

http://kopa-hus.se/fragaexperterna.html

This might be the best thing to do! smile.gif
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Puffin
post 29.Jan.2012, 11:15 PM
Post #21
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

What sort of contract did you sign?

Sometimes people sign contracts with a subject to survey clause (and sometimes they don't)

However if you did it may give you wiggle room to dispute what the term "prepared for underfloor heating" actually means - and argue for a price reduction to cover the extra costs that you weren't expecting
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John.Smith
post 30.Jan.2012, 09:06 AM
Post #22
Location: Sweden
Joined: 12.Sep.2011

+1
I agree. It does not explicitly state what preparation or readiness for underfloor heating. The fact that there are pipes in place for radiators indicates to me that what they meant was that these same pipes could be used to supply an underfloor heating system.

Either way, it is clear that the cost of installation is up to the buyer! They has somewhat of a misleading statement but factually it is true. You should have investigated this with an expert before bidding.... Buyer beware!
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DaveN
post 30.Jan.2012, 12:23 PM
Post #23
Joined: 28.Feb.2007

A floor prepared for under floor heating will have pipes under it. Quite simple really. A floor without, is not prepared. Negotiate with the agent/seller.

You don't have to have a survey on a property, although it is obviously adviseable. It's up to you if you don't, although the sellers may well be able to wriggle out of the 'warranty' rules. Same as you don't have to have the energy declaration, although you have the right to one, and if not forthcoming from the seller you can pay yourself and get the money back from them.
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Rick Methven
post 30.Jan.2012, 12:45 PM
Post #24
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

Did the seller provide a survey (besiktning) at all?

It is normal nowadays for seller to provide one that you can either accept as is, or get your own done or do the halfway option of going around with the surveyor, so that he can explain the points he raised in the original survey.

Banks normally require a survey to be done and accepted as part of a mortgage agreement and you normally have so many weeks to get accept a survey between contract signing and completion.

If the survey shows defects not mentioned in the contact, you could either annul the contract or negotiate a reduction.
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mångk
post 30.Jan.2012, 02:09 PM
Post #25
Joined: 27.Jul.2008

I would say that the purchaser should always follow the information and recommendations in the link I provided above.

For such an important purchase the safety first approach cannot be more strongly recommended.

No survey introduces so many problems including insurance payout problems in the event something does go wrong!
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skogsbo
post 30.Jan.2012, 02:59 PM
Post #26
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

our German neighbours about a km away are selling up, they've had it 20yrs. The new buyer insisted on a full survey. Survey found some damp in the floors, so they rightly backed out.
Builder pulls up floors and finds more damp, rotten wood and dry rot.
Specialist comes and finds fungus in walls, samples sent off to lab.
Not good fungus, spreading internally and spores are bad for you.
House now worthless and might need pulling down, after any internal fittings have been saved. Turns out, that some of their add ons; veranda, lean to, small sauna extension, had blocked up too many underfloor air vents. Ooops!

A full survey and leaving nothing to chance, could save you some heartache in the future.
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Rick Methven
post 30.Jan.2012, 04:48 PM
Post #27
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

An Estate agent friend of ours, who I bought our house through, says that she always advises clients who are selling to get a Besiktning done before it goes on the market as it gives her a better idea of what price to put it on the market for and makes it more attractive for buyers as they can get the full low down on the property when they view it. She has refused to take on sales for clients who have refused to do a pre-sale Besiktning as she becomes suspicious that they know it might have a problem that is not visible during a visning.
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skogsbo
post 30.Jan.2012, 05:14 PM
Post #28
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

not sure now but in Scotland they previously had a system where the agent did a survey for the seller, which cost the seller say £500. You as a prospective buyer had to buy into the survey just to view it, say £100-150 a time, if the property had many interested parties, the agency was raking it in, without even selling! This was before you even reached the sealed bids style buying stage, where everything went for 10-15% above the asking price.
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Mib
post 30.Jan.2012, 06:15 PM
Post #29
Joined: 7.Jul.2006

A friend of mine recently bought a place and one of the buildings did not have planning permission. They only found out a week before they were due to sign the contract. They got a lawyer involved to ensure they understood their rights and they are Swedish, so know more about the pitfalls than us immigrants. Anyway, they have managed to get the contract signing delayed until there is a conclusion on the permission ie. they get the permission retrospectively or they get the money off the price including the cost of demolition. Not ideal...but they want the place.

Simply pulling out is an option you have to really be sure about as there as I understand legal implications and potentially you could be sued and lose your deposit or if you win against the seller, they might transfer their wealth etc to another fanily memeber and then you can get nothing in compensation.

So the motto is to make sure you understand what you are buying and anlayse all the information and if some descriptions are ambiguous then you get clarity in writing from the seller/estate agent. If you're buying a house, especially if you're from abroad, always DO a survey and always check that they have permission for the building. Recently in Vasaparken, there had been a shop selling ice cream etc for the last 10 or so years and only now has someone discovered that they never had permission to build on that land. Not too sure how you get away with that...but shows how viligant you have to be.

When you are making probably the biggest purchase of your life, never take any short cuts....if you contract a builder to build you a house, ensure that they are reputable, have a good credit rating and get references. Again...people paid for new homes and some ended up with a plot of land with just the foundations done...as the company had gone bust with all of their customers money.

Someone may correct me, but I even heard someone who bought a place who became liable for the previous owners debts. Can't remember the details, but Sweden seems to have some barmy laws that you need to be aware of to avoid grief and stress.
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lewis_rj
post 30.Jan.2012, 07:10 PM
Post #30
Joined: 29.Jan.2012

QUOTE (Rick Methven @ 30.Jan.2012, 12:45 PM) *
Did the seller provide a survey (besiktning) at all?

Yes, and we went round with the surveyor
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