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Coffee & half-and-half

Too sour for my taste

organic225
post 6.Jul.2012, 02:20 PM
Post #1
Joined: 7.Apr.2012

Okay, this is a really basic question, but have any of you from the U.S. noticed how coffee tastes different in Sweden? It doesn't matter where I get it, whether at the store to brew at home or from a cafe. I dont like it because it tastes very sour to me. I'm not saying the coffee in Sweden is of poor quality; in fact, I'm sure it's very well made. Perhaps it is an acquired taste. Does anyone have any suggestions of a brand of coffee (besides Starbucks) that tastes more like the coffee in the U.S.?

Also, do any of you make your own half-and-half? I've tried the coffee cream (gradde) 10% from the store but am not a fan.

Thanks for any insight!
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NyDag
post 6.Jul.2012, 02:59 PM
Post #2
Joined: 5.Jun.2012

No sorry I don't know where you can buy dirt in a jar.
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byke
post 6.Jul.2012, 03:06 PM
Post #3
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

What an unpleasant response.
They obviously don't understand English properly.
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sometimesinsweden
post 6.Jul.2012, 03:12 PM
Post #4
Joined: 15.Jun.2012

QUOTE (organic225 @ 6.Jul.2012, 02:20 PM) *
Okay, this is a really basic question, but have any of you from the U.S. noticed how coffee tastes different in Sweden? It doesn't matter where I get it, whether at the st ... (show full quote)

Why don't you just buy a lighter-roasted blend and not let it brew as long?
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Silberfüchschen
post 6.Jul.2012, 03:48 PM
Post #5
Location: Europe
Joined: 24.May.2012

Have you tried Gevalia Milea? I do not know how it compares to American coffee, but it is supposed to be mild (less bitter). I think it has a nice taste.
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AW1
post 6.Jul.2012, 04:06 PM
Post #6
Location: Södermanland
Joined: 20.Mar.2012

QUOTE (NyDag @ 6.Jul.2012, 02:59 PM) *
No sorry I don't know where you can buy dirt in a jar.

No? How about coffee? Since that was what he was asking about. Twat
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Puffin
post 6.Jul.2012, 05:27 PM
Post #7
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

I have always found that Swedes like very strong coffee

If you are making it at home - Check what type you are getting Mörkrost tastes (to me) more bitter than mellanrost and lättrost etc - also make sure you are buying the right type ie brygg (for machines) or kok (boiling)

If out perhaps choose milky drinks such as latte
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olga118
post 6.Jul.2012, 07:20 PM
Post #8
Joined: 27.Jan.2012

The coffee here is just too strong for me. When I drink it I use much less coffee than the brewer calls for. Have you tried cutting the cream in half with some milk? I mix it about, well, half and half!
The flip side of this is that my husband hates the coffee in the USA, he always brings Swedish coffee with him when he goes back.
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entry
post 6.Jul.2012, 10:50 PM
Post #9
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 1.Jul.2007

We use a brushed stainless steel Bodum coffee press with kok kaffe. We like it very much. Sometimes it is not just the coffee but how the coffee is made that matters.

Attached Image

There are some sales going on right now. I noticed the Gevalia automatic perk coffee was selling at one supermarket chain in Gothenburg for 79Sek for three 500g packages. This is a savings of 30-40SEK. We will have to wait until the kok coffee comes on sale.
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organic225
post 7.Jul.2012, 03:00 PM
Post #10
Joined: 7.Apr.2012

Thanks for the helpful replies about brands of coffee and equipment to use. I'll also try using less coffee than is called for to see if that helps. Not sure if any of you have flown out of Landvetter recently, but they have a large new cafe and sandwich bar in the terminal, and the coffee there is fantastic.
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entry
post 7.Jul.2012, 03:39 PM
Post #11
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 1.Jul.2007

The equipment that is used is important. Making coffee is a business and a science. Having worked with companies in the business I have learned that different beans and different coarseness of the grind directly relate to the temperatures that the coffee is brewed. Too high a temperature and the coffee is bitter. Too low and the beans do not release the oils and flavor. Experiment, have fun and enjoy a nice cup of coffee. -Paul
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Amber Dawn
post 8.Jul.2012, 11:51 AM
Post #12
Joined: 18.Sep.2009

After two years, American coffee tastes way too weak for me. lol I never thought that would be the case. As for half and half, there's a dairy product called Latte Art that they sell at Willy's, among other places, that I like.
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Hisingen
post 8.Jul.2012, 08:17 PM
Post #13
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

It's funny, but when I first read the headline my thoughts went off on a very different track - namely to Kaffehalva, otherwise known as kaffekask. And that is coffee of quite a different character, being coffee to which you have added brännvin, in no small measure. See the last paragraph for the recipe.

But on the OP subject, what does create a difference is the water. Years ago on visits to Finland, I was appalled by the coffee which, to me, tasted like dishwater. So I took Swedish coffee over with me. It tasted a bit better, but still not up to the quality it had in Sweden. Then as things improved for the Finns, so did their coffee, which was roasted and ground to mainly suit their conditions, and the water had less effect. They tell me that English teas does not taste as in England, and that is presumably for the same reason.

I can remember the American coffee that was available during the war and where I became used to it, and that was pretty mild, and many of the servicemen on the base beside my village used masses of sugar to make it drinkable (for them). Swedish coffee is available in varying blends, and you might find buying the beans - after finding a roast that suits you - is your best bet for getting the kind of coffee you require. There are different ways of preparing it, too. The coffee press, the percolator, the brewing machine, and the smaller Italian 'two-container' method. I nearly forgot, too, the latest capsule machines, where, by using a refillable capsule, you can produce your own blends and strength. It is a science, no matter which way you look at it, but once you find your perfect formula, then you are home and dry.

When teaching English at evening classes a few years ago I was given an end-of-term present in the form of a special glass for making kaffehalva. It had a ten öre coin cast into the bottom, and the recipe for this 'drink' was to make a very cloudy coffee, pour it into the glass until the coin was no longer visible. Then pour in brännvin until it re-appeared. Repeat until you had your glass full, then simply drink. I tried it, but honestly would not recommend it. But such was my taste. Good luck on that one anyway. It won't solve the coffee half and half problem for you - but could make for an interesting evening - - - -
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 8.Jul.2012, 09:39 PM
Post #14
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

This
Attached Image
and this
Attached Image
should fix your problems...
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entry
post 8.Jul.2012, 10:49 PM
Post #15
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 1.Jul.2007

Yeah, that will put hair on your chest or take the hair off your chest. Good Coffee! smile.gif
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