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Parquet Floor Repair

Ooops.. DIY disaster

sumodaz
post 7.Nov.2012, 09:07 AM
Post #1
Joined: 7.Nov.2012

Hi

I'm due to move out of my rented Stockholm apartment in a month or so and I noticed my computer chair has damaged the parquet flooring. I tried to repair it myself but my "repair" has made it embarrassingly worse. I've sent of for a couple of quotes from looking on Google, which i'm now waiting for but I wondered if anyone here can recommend anyone for the job or has any ideas. I've attached an image.

Thanks
Darren
 
Attached Image
 
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Crazy.Lee
post 7.Nov.2012, 09:49 AM
Post #2
Location: Malmö
Joined: 6.Nov.2012

"Dents
Small, shallow dents in pine and other soft woods are usually easy to remove; large and deep dents, especially in hard wood, are harder to repair. Dents are easiest to remove from bare wood. Very large, shallow dents are probably best left untreated. Very deep dents should be filled, as detailed below for cracks and gouges.

To raise the wood in the dent, apply a few drops of water to the dent and let the water penetrate the wood for a day or so. Do not wet the entire surface. This treatment may be enough to raise the dent, especially if the dent is shallow and the wood is soft.
If this doesn't raise the dent, soak a cloth in water and wring it out. Place the damp cloth, folded in several layers, over the dent; then press the cloth firmly with a warm iron.
Be careful not to touch the iron directly to the wood. This moist heat may be enough to swell the wood and raise the dent. If it isn't, apply a commercial wood-swelling liquid to the area and give it time to work -- about a day or so, as directed by the manufacturer." Revarnish when your done.
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johnjohn
post 7.Nov.2012, 09:51 AM
Post #3
Joined: 10.Dec.2010

Yes you can repair it. Re-sand, refinish. Best however to get someone who knows what they are doing or buy your landlord a new area rug and hope it it's not moved for a good while.
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sumodaz
post 7.Nov.2012, 10:05 AM
Post #4
Joined: 7.Nov.2012

I wish I could go back to yesterday morning before my "repair".. It didn't look as bad as it does now and I probably would have had a better chance of fixing it myself with some of your tips. The problem is I found some varnish in the cupboard which said it was clear so I used it but where the scratches are deep its has dyed the wood making it darker, so now its 10x more noticeable. If this was my last apartment where the landlord was an ass, I probably would have just pulled the bed over it but this landlady is really nice and has been very good to us since we arrived so I really want to get a good repair done of it.
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johnjohn
post 7.Nov.2012, 10:56 AM
Post #5
Joined: 10.Dec.2010

It's not rocket science. Find a handyman. Lots of people can fix this. It will be fine.
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 7.Nov.2012, 03:11 PM
Post #6
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

Go to a hardware/paint store and ask them. There are hard waxes for floor repair you can buy. Do not attempt to use sandpaper or anything that would remove the floor finish, because then you may need to redo the whole floor.

It is also quite possible that the darker color will disappear in a few days. Your varnish was probably soaked up by the exposed wood in the dents, why it looks darker.
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John.Smith
post 7.Nov.2012, 04:42 PM
Post #7
Location: Sweden
Joined: 12.Sep.2011

1. First of all, use a varnish remover with a cotton bud to remove the excess (only the excess) that is in the grooves.
2. Look for a hard wax (neutral or no colour) to apply into the grooves. This will remove the appearance of the grooves but is not a permanent fix. The discolouration will fade over time and the grooves will become less apparent.

The only permanent solution is to sand and varnish the whole floor.

As you have learned, varnish will gather in the dents and bumps on wood and should only be applied on smooth surfaces.
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 7.Nov.2012, 06:37 PM
Post #8
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

And!

Don't forget to put "softer" casters on your computer chair.
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Snood
post 8.Nov.2012, 10:24 AM
Post #9
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

I can't help out with repair advice other than what others have already said but

we use these for our computer chairs on our wooden floors
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byke
post 8.Nov.2012, 10:36 AM
Post #10
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

Exactly, let your kolon take all the damage instead biggrin.gif
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sumodaz
post 8.Nov.2012, 11:48 AM
Post #11
Joined: 7.Nov.2012

I wish I had spent the 199kr when i moved in. The one quote i have so far is 6250kr to repair the 30cm x 30cm area. Is this typical Swedish prices for repair work? Thanks for your help, there's some good suggestions, ill be taking a trip to a hardware store at the weekend to see that i can find.
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 8.Nov.2012, 01:24 PM
Post #12
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

It is impossible to say because you don't say what the quote involves. Replacing floor boards or sanding/painting? In any case a carpenter would probably not just repair the damaged boards since the repaired area would look very different from the rest of the floor. You need to replace or sand/paint the whole floor for consistency.
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olga118
post 8.Nov.2012, 03:33 PM
Post #13
Joined: 27.Jan.2012

You may want to consider contacting the apartment owner and asking what she would like you to do. After all, it is her property and she may want to make that decision herself.
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John.Smith
post 9.Nov.2012, 07:34 AM
Post #14
Location: Sweden
Joined: 12.Sep.2011

To be honest, I would try selective sanding of just the affected areas. Using a very fine sand paper work around the grooves and sand down the appearance of the edges. You should be able to match the varnish colour. It will not look exactly the same colour as the rest of the floor but as the varnish matures and the floor gets walked on the colour and tone difference will fade over time.
Give it a year or so after the repair and nobody would notice as it is such a small localised area.

This is as much as any repair guy would do without sanding the whole floor. If the landlady asks you to arrange for the whole floor to be repaired I would refuse. This is typical wear and tear although you do have some 'negligence'. But to redo the whole floor is excessive in my opinion.

//J:S:
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sumodaz
post 9.Nov.2012, 04:55 PM
Post #15
Joined: 7.Nov.2012

Happy end. Thanks for all your advice, I appreciate it. I thought I would do what John suggested and sand the selected areas. After looking for an area to practice on (before I worked on the area in the middle of the floor), I moved the wardrobe only to find that many parquet pieces were missing or loose. I took a piece and tried to deliberately damage it, putting my full weight on the chair and sliding back and forward for a good 10 minutes I cannot damage it. Even when I angle the chair so the chair corners are touching the parquet and slide with my full weight, it just covers the parquet in white paint from the chair. My conclusion; the damage was done before I moved in and I didn't notice it. Moral of the story; always check carefully for damage when you first move in. rolleyes.gif
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