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First visit to Sweden coming up

Considering moving my family from the US to SE

johnjohn
post 26.Nov.2012, 08:34 PM
Post #16
Joined: 10.Dec.2010

Sorry Svenksmith, Minnesota out of the question as congresswoman Michelle "batshit crazy" Bachmann, Tea Party queen is a representative there.
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Svensksmith
post 26.Nov.2012, 08:55 PM
Post #17
Joined: 28.Jul.2011

Ahhh, politicians come and go just like the carpet baggers they are. Minnesota is a beautiful place and will continue to be so.
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Yorkshireman
post 26.Nov.2012, 09:00 PM
Post #18
Joined: 22.Nov.2011

I won't say don't come to Sweden to live ... you already have received that from a number of people. Sweden is a very child/parent friendly country. I didn't say family, because it is focussed upon parents and children, whether they live together or not wink.gif

It doesn't matter whether You have past relatives in Sweden or not, the fact is that immigration due to family ties requires a very strong dependancy that, unless it is a child, existed before the person living in Sweden came here. So, basically that is not an option for You.

The only way You can become resident in Sweden would be via Work Permits, ie. You must find a job and that be approved by Migrationsverket. Without knowing what skills/education You both have, it is not possible to say it will be easy or not. Note: Even that is not a certainty either, since the work permits are valid normally for max 2 years at a time, and it takes 4 years before the possibility to be granted a permanent residence... so do you want to move your family on the possibility that You will have to leave the country if you the job goes belly-up and you cannot find another?

Having a 5 year plan may sound wonderful, do consider Your children, the longer you leave any move to another country, the harder it becomes for the children to pick up languages. There is a risk that they will fall behind in both education and social life (initially may find themselves very lonely with no friends), move whilst they are very young smile.gif, and their minds are like sponges that can soak up anything and everything wink.gif
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Migga
post 26.Nov.2012, 10:48 PM
Post #19
Joined: 26.Jul.2011

Hi Liz

Sweden is one of the best countries in the world and you can make a great life for your family. On the other hand Sweden has the same problems like most other countries. There is unemployment, cutbacks, racism, sexism and so on. With that said it`s a secular country which has made big strides when it comes to social rights and equality. Even if there is ways to go.

I will be honest and say that there are alot of posters on here that have negative views of Sweden and Swedes. You shouldn`t take their word as law any more then you take my words.

My overall view about your plans is that you should do whatever you`d like to do. You should do what you want and not let anyone else tell you what you should or shouldn`t do. But if you are considering to settle down in a new country I do have some advice. It will be hard to move to any country in the world if you aren`t prepared. Coming to visit is a great idea. Key places in Sweden is Stockholm/Göteborg,/Malmö there is no denying that. That`s where I think you will have the best shot and settling down. Stockholm is the capital, Göteborg is close to Norway and Malmö is close to Denmark.

You should also prepare by getting a job, learning abit of the language, get a sense of the way of life, experience the culture, learn the norms, know the values and so on. Make friends, network and build some social ties. This will make it alot easier.

Where the best or worst neighbourhoods are depends on your definition. If it`s swedish family life you want then there are smaller towns where it`s safe and quiet. If you want diversity then the major cities is your ticket. The major cities are best for work but you would probably want to live some ways out of the city center if you have a family. When it comes to work you should know that unemployment is relatively high and it`s the highest amongst immigrants. Being a non-native journalist in a small market will be hard.

When it comes to hostility towards immigrants Sweden isn`t any better or worse then any other country. If you want to integrate and make a good life for yourself you can, there isn`t some racist structure preventing that.
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jostein
post 26.Nov.2012, 11:46 PM
Post #20
Joined: 22.Mar.2011

Hehe, sweden would turn you people into hardcore teapartiers in under two years biggrin.gif Be carefull what you wish for!

I normally feel sorry for americans stupid enough to move to sweden. But in your case im struggling hard to supress a fit of glee.
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byke
post 27.Nov.2012, 12:59 AM
Post #21
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

I recently discovered another forum in which both swedes and non swedes talk about the pluses and minuses of living in Sweden.

It may be worth also having a look on the other site to try and get a more rounded view of living in Sweden after the honeymoon period is over.

http://britishexpats.com/forum/showthread.php?t=746908

Its interesting to also compare peoples views compared to other forums on that site.
In regards to the good and the bad.

Good luck.
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 27.Nov.2012, 01:51 AM
Post #22
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

If you are ambigious about your present life, why do you think any move would be beneficial?

To move to something that is quite different might sound right, but, you must remember that you cannot move away from yourself.

Think about it.
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Osk
post 27.Nov.2012, 11:39 AM
Post #23
Joined: 28.Nov.2005

I have two comments for you both base don my experience and not perceptions.

Gender equality - don't bank on it. Sweden is not utopia is this respect. It is still very much who you know and if you happen to be a man so much the better. Swedes talk a good talk in this and other respects but the reality is even if there is law there is discrimination in practice.

Photography - things happen in Sweden a bit after other countries jn many respects, there are no more newspapers etc here than anywhere else and fewer magazines. Print media will declines just as everywhere. I am a pro photographer with images with Getty sold worldwide yet my local paper will take zero pictures from me - even for free - as I am not on their staff or provide images to their contracted image agency. It is a closed shop in this area.

Someone above says you may want to live outside a city - well just like most countries kids are moving right back into cities form the country to get jobs etc. Sweden is a small country people wise - there are far fewer opportunities for young people than in the Uk or I guess the US. People might want to bring their kids up in a safer environment (which is arguable) but by doing that you will also reduce their future prospects.

Incidentally, I was recently speaking to a 25 year old woman who has been in Sweden since she was 8. has a job, speaks perfect Swedish of course, but told me she has always been and continues to be reminded in subtle ways by her friends of 17 years that she is not a real Swede.
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skogsbo
post 27.Nov.2012, 12:13 PM
Post #24
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (Osk @ 27.Nov.2012, 11:39 AM) *
Someone above says you may want to live outside a city - well just like most countries kids are moving right back into cities form the country to get jobs etc. Sweden is a sma ... (show full quote)

the opportunities are proportional, smaller country less of them, but less people chasing them. Incidentally the UK has a far far bigger problem with those under 25 who are not in training or employment etc.. the so called NEETS, it's a massive percentage, something like 25%, more than the EU average. Over a 1/3 of those without jobs in the UK are under 25.

Not sure how you believe their prospects are reduced, most Swedes leave the education system with the comparable education to the US or UK, but also with the ability to converse in more than 1 language, I'd say that broadens, not narrows your options? All the Swedes living and working in the UK, might disagree with you too. They can waltz over to the UK and pick up good jobs quite readily, because most have a high enough level of English, the opposite certainly isn't true?

QUOTE (Osk @ 27.Nov.2012, 11:39 AM) *
Incidentally, I was recently speaking to a 25 year old woman who has been in Sweden since she was 8. has a job, speaks perfect Swedish of course, but told me she has always be ... (show full quote)

well she isn't is she, you can't change your history, I'll always be from the UK, I don't expect it to change! If people didn't rib each other about that, it would be her body, her taste in men, her hair colour etc.. I'm not sure what folk expect sometimes.
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Yorkshireman
post 27.Nov.2012, 01:05 PM
Post #25
Joined: 22.Nov.2011

QUOTE (Osk @ 27.Nov.2012, 11:39 AM) *
Incidentally, I was recently speaking to a 25 year old woman who has been in Sweden since she was 8. has a job, speaks perfect Swedish of course, but told me she has always be ... (show full quote)

Someone is being quite over-sensitive there, me thinks... wink.gif ...maybe Her friends don't do anything of the kind on purpose!

Mind You it kind of fits into this d*mned awful behaviour that has popped up over the last few years where suddenly everyone who has a little thing go against them they shout ..."Jag känner mig kränkt"!
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Osk
post 27.Nov.2012, 01:52 PM
Post #26
Joined: 28.Nov.2005

Of course you would know as you know the person and were there at the time so can make an informed judgement.
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Osk
post 27.Nov.2012, 02:09 PM
Post #27
Joined: 28.Nov.2005

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 27.Nov.2012, 01:13 PM) *
the opportunities are proportional, smaller country less of them, but less people chasing them. Incidentally the UK has a far far bigger problem with those under 25 who are no ... (show full quote)

Perhaps I should be more specific - in my opinion there is a greater diversity of business in the UK hence reduced prospects comment for those in Sweden.There are more competing businesses looking for high quality staff, it is nothing to do with education which I am not questioning. Perhaps Swedes working in the Uk may care to answer why they went to the Uk for a job? and your comment on the opposite is quite valid which is why I point this out to the OP as it may well apply to them .

As for your comment on the woman who has been here since she was 8 and is not treated a a real Swede - well how refreshingly honest - oh I see you are from the UK - most Swedes I talk to toe the great integration line and would say she is treated no differently. This is again just for the OP, don't be fooled by the great integration line - you will always be an outsider and your kids sons and daughters of outsiders. When it comes to networking and jobs that won't be forgotten. BTW I am not saying it is better or worse here than other places just don't fall for the utopia it can appear to be.
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John.Smith
post 27.Nov.2012, 02:30 PM
Post #28
Location: Sweden
Joined: 12.Sep.2011

Yeah... I love it here, but then again, my wife is Swedish, my kids are Swedish (despite their foreign family name) but they are treated no differently to other kids who are actually infatuated that they can speak two languages. They think its cool!

I am happy because I do not need to worry that my kids will ever feel that they are not accepted, or struggle with the culture and language etc... I found it hard at times for myself to 'integrate' and still would not consider myself Swedish. I am proud of my heritage and citizenship and I am not afraid to express it either. But I NEVER Swede-bash. I just simply ACCEPT the way things are done here even if they seem baffling at times.

When in Rome and all that.

Do not expect your kids to feel happy here. It will as a minimum be a lonely experience for the first few years as they learn the language, adapt to social protocol and school etc.. They will also have to put up with parents who will have a strained existence socially, emotionally and financially for the first few years...

I would guarantee that when your kids are old enough they would choose to move back to the States anyway.

I am not a pessimist, I love it here, but there is no way I would have made a decision to move here permanently if it were not for my 'Swedish' family. I think a more realistic solution would be to look for contract work for 1-2 years here. Let the kids enjoy life here for a while where there is no pressure to conform or 'be' Swedish. If that works out well then consider a permanent move.

Sweden has a lot to offer in terms of family life and general 'wellbeingness'. Also take the talk of racism with a pinch of salt (or two). Yes it exists, like it exists in all countries all over the world. I do not see it myself and my best mate who has a child of mixed race and culture (Norwegian/African-American) has not seen it. My co-workers who are from India have not seen it themselves either? Go figure...

You say that you want to move for your kids benefit... I would reconsider what is good for the kids in the longer term to be honest.
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cogito
post 27.Nov.2012, 02:41 PM
Post #29
Joined: 30.Dec.2009

QUOTE (LizDickinson @ 26.Nov.2012, 04:08 PM) *
... have been trying to get into the photojournalism/journalism world for some time... and my heart skipped a beat. My dream is journalism... ... my husband and I are...very m ... (show full quote)

"...eastern philosophy towards life..."??? Buddhist? Hindu? Hare krishna?
Sweden is not exactly Zen-nation.
Unless, by "eastern" you mean Russia. Lots of similarities there.

As for dreams of photo-journlaism...the line forms to the right. Unless you have published work in respected media, you'll need a solid bank account.

I hope you already have your passports. The waiting times are long these days because the number of Americans emigrating has sky-rocketed since 2010. Also, Americans have been renouncing citizenship in record numbers in the past two years.

Dreams are nice, but a reality-check is sometimes a good idea.
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cogito
post 27.Nov.2012, 02:47 PM
Post #30
Joined: 30.Dec.2009

QUOTE (Likvid @ 26.Nov.2012, 04:14 PM) *
New Yorkers are actuallly more friendly than people on Stockholm.

...by far. So are Parisians. And politer.

QUOTE (jostein @ 26.Nov.2012, 11:46 PM) *
Hehe, sweden would turn you people into hardcore teapartiers in under two years biggrin.gif

True that.
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