• Sweden edition
 
The comments below have not been moderated in advance and are not produced by The Local unless clearly stated.
Readers are responsible for the content of their own comments. Comments that breach our terms and conditions will be removed.
2 Pages V   1 2 >   Reply to this topic

Living in the Stockholm area

Sweden Housing, taxes, etc.

JailBreak
post 8.Jan.2013, 03:53 PM
Post #1
Joined: 8.Jan.2013

Hi

I may accept an offer from a Swedish company to work in Sweden in the area of Stockholm. I am an IT guy.

I know there is many topics talking about this, but I some extra questions.

First I have wife and 2 kids(with 5 and 12 years old), and I will like to know if the money they offer we can have a moderate life over there.

The offer is 90k EUR, that I think is around 770k SEK a year. But the taxes will take half(or something similar) and that is my concern. Should be around 45%???

I will like to rent a house(not an apartment) with at least 3 bed rooms for now, then if everything is ok after 1 year or 2, buy one. We are use to have a good life and I don't want to go to a country where I need to restrict my money(or costs). Because of the taxes that takes half of my salary income and the cost of living is to hight.

Housing, schools(private or not), kindergarten, etc., are my main concerns about moving to Sweden.

Thank you for all the answer and help.

JL
Go to the top of the page
+
JailBreak
post 8.Jan.2013, 03:56 PM
Post #2
Joined: 8.Jan.2013

Sorry to add, I am a Portuguese living in Germany(moved from Switzerland).
Go to the top of the page
+
PDX
post 8.Jan.2013, 04:58 PM
Post #3
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Aug.2011

Well, let's see:

Link to German tax calculator:
http://www.parmentier.de/steuer/steuer.htm?wagetax.htm

gives for a yearly salary of 90.000 euro, a net income of 50.540,44 euro, for a tax rate of 43,8%

Link to Swedish tax calculator:
http://www.ekonomifakta.se/sv/Fakta/Skatte...a-ut-din-skatt/

gives for a monthly salary of 64.167 SEK (corresponding to yearly salary of 770k SEK), a net monthly income of 39.146 SEK, for a tax rate of 39%.

A lower tax in Sweden than Germany blink.gif ? Weird, right? I am sure I missed some German deductions, but I thought the basic settings would apply to at least a single person. I would appreciate corrections...

~~~PDX~~~
Go to the top of the page
+
JailBreak
post 8.Jan.2013, 05:18 PM
Post #4
Joined: 8.Jan.2013

Hi PDX,

Thank you for you reply.

Yes you are right, but deductions can reduce very much the taxes. Also the area where I live(Aachen) is much more cheaper than Sweden/Stockholm.

Just comparing housing we have a big, big difference. In Sweden for a good house I will spend 1/3 of my monthly wage.(maybe I am not looking in the right places)

Even I get the same 90k in Germany(around that), the offer in Sweden is more about the career, not the money.

This why I need to understand if this a good decision based on the cost of living on both country's.

Looking at 39k net value, what do you think about this for a family living in Sweden???

Thank You again.

JL
Go to the top of the page
+
PDX
post 8.Jan.2013, 05:26 PM
Post #5
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Aug.2011

QUOTE (JailBreak @ 8.Jan.2013, 05:18 PM) *
Looking at 39k net value, what do you think about this for a family living in Sweden???

Well, I don't have a family and I think that 39k net is OK for a young single person, but I suppose that is not what you want to hear rolleyes.gif .

What seems to be clear though is that you are definitely not going to have the same lifestyle with the same expenses as in Aachen.

Renting the house is going to be by far your largest expense, so have a look at www.blocket.se .

~~~PDX~~~
Go to the top of the page
+
Somebody
post 8.Jan.2013, 05:27 PM
Post #6
Joined: 17.Oct.2011

QUOTE (JailBreak @ 8.Jan.2013, 05:18 PM) *
Hi PDX,Thank you for you reply.Yes you are right, but deductions can reduce very much the taxes. Also the area where I live(Aachen) is much more cheaper than Sweden/Stockholm. ... (show full quote)

when you consider Stockholm and you will be the only one earning the money in your family
it's a litle bit tight for 4 people IMHO
Go to the top of the page
+
JailBreak
post 8.Jan.2013, 05:40 PM
Post #7
Joined: 8.Jan.2013

Hi,

Yes that is what I was thinking dry.gif

Maybe this is not a good option.

JL
Go to the top of the page
+
byke
post 8.Jan.2013, 06:13 PM
Post #8
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

Private schools or private day care are rather pricey in Stockholm.
With often large admission fee costs, and high terms costs.
Go to the top of the page
+
lvivien
post 8.Jan.2013, 09:58 PM
Post #9
Joined: 8.Jan.2013

Hi,

Im living in Stockholm since May with my sweedish husband. Originally Im from Hungary.

I just would like to reccomend to think it over very much.

Shortly i hate living here, and most of the emmigrants i got to know here feel the same. Sweeden is good for those people who are very poor at home, and come here for better living. Im a lawyer, my husband is IT, we were living round the same level in Hungary (less income, but less outgoing as well). The weather is awful, almost always rain/snow or at least very cold wind, the child cannot go out normally dressed. In the shops very hard to buy anything, i used to it that i can choose from several brands etc, here you can buy everywhere the same three four type of things. So you should order eg from home, Danmark, Germany etc, they not even have a drogerie, not any kind. But the biggest problem is the children stuff, at least if you are having demands. And the health care system is very bad. They say its free, but actually you should always pay, even at family dr, and it is very difficult to get to a dr, just nurses everywhere with not too much knowledge.
The people are not polite and behave strangly if you speak english not sweedish.

So if you have a good living standard its not worth. (i have eg here as well economicly thats not a problem: big bought flat, car, normal monthly sallary etc)

We are saying that in this country only the surface is glittering :-)
Go to the top of the page
+
Boar
post 8.Jan.2013, 10:25 PM
Post #10
Joined: 2.Jul.2011

Will you work here? I wonder why your children are not eligible for free day care and free schooling? Why private facilities when all is free here?
Medical is like maximum 900 sek and dental something like maximum 3000 sek and medicines also 3000 sek... something something .. like that and after that everything is free. That's OK I believe. But in eastern Europe to get good service you pay and also need to bribe a little.
This is a country for leeches, where is the problem? I don't get it.
You need a house (Villa if you mean) which is bigger. That means you can live 50-100 kilometres outside Stockholm maybe for 8-10K a month. Or live in a small house for 30 kilometres for same price. If apartment is what you want to avoid.
Go to the top of the page
+
Mib
post 8.Jan.2013, 10:34 PM
Post #11
Joined: 7.Jul.2006

Based on the iphone app called Lön 2013, yoir monthly take home will be about 40,450kr p/m based in Stockholm. In most cases, you don't need a car as the transport system is very reliable and costs 790kr p/m for a monthly pass. I bought when I came to Stockholm, so can't comment on rental costs. Depending on your view regarding the future for the Euro, you may want to keep your money in Germany as the Kronor is strong at the moment. Depends on your lifestyle, but 40,250kr would just about cover your living costs without any saving.

Sweden is what you make of it, just like in any country. The quality of life is good and some people like snow. It's fantastic in the summer in Stockholm (normally). The people I work with are very nice and easy going. You get back what you put in. For the longer term, I would recommemd learning Swedish, but you can survive without it, but life is easier knowing Swedish. Coming from the UK, it feels safer, less crowded and cheaper for some things, such as housing, childcare. You get 30% tax relief on mortgage interest etc.

Some people hate Sweden, some like it...some even love it. It's a challenge for many to move to a new country. Do your research, before making a final decision. The fact is some people expected Sweden to be a utopian society. It isn't!! It has many faults. Finally, it feels likely (hope not) that the current Government will be replaced at the next election by a more left wing Government. Who knows what mad tax ideas they have...maybe France will inspire them smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
+
Mib
post 8.Jan.2013, 10:43 PM
Post #12
Joined: 7.Jul.2006

Oh just as an example, Taylors and Jones butchers started up by expats in Stockholm started as a simple food delivery service. 6 years later, they will have several shops and are supplying sausages to several supermarkets across the country. They have embraced Sweden, learnt the language and developed a growing business. If they had listened to every negative comment on here, they wouldn't be here today with a successful business.
Go to the top of the page
+
lvivien
post 8.Jan.2013, 11:15 PM
Post #13
Joined: 8.Jan.2013

Sorry for being so negative. Im not saying not to come, just see both sides, and decide that way. Not to come in a way that eg is pink. Of course there are good things as well, just not eg, but before i came i just read positive opinions and if i would know eg most likely i decide to stay home.
Of course eg has two sides, for example the health care system is bad if you have small everyday problems, but very good in serious "big" illnesses, but hopefully we shouldnt try that side.
Go to the top of the page
+
byke
post 9.Jan.2013, 03:09 AM
Post #14
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

Another thing you will need to be aware of is the differences in levels of education in Sweden compared to many other nations. Education for children doesn't start in Sweden until the child is 7 years old, which means if you are here for only 2 or 3 years - you could find that if you move again you child may be at a disadvantage due to varying levels in education between Sweden and other countries. The only way to combat this is to find a school that offers a different curriculum to that of the Swedish curriculum. And in Stockholm, I believe there is only two schools that offers this but both are private, so you will have to pay for it.
Go to the top of the page
+
JailBreak
post 9.Jan.2013, 12:03 PM
Post #15
Joined: 8.Jan.2013

Hi

Thank You all for you answers and share your experiences in Sweden.

I am use to new cultures. I was in Switzerland for 2 years(Zürich and Geneva) and previous I live in Paris for one year. But always alone, the family back home.

Now we here in Germany and like I said, my choice for thinking about the proposal is not the money itself, but the career that I may have in this new position. Something that I know will be more difficult in my actual job.

But I have done a lot of sacrifices during the years so that my family can have a good lifestyle and don't want to give that away for a salary in a new country that we need to count the money every month.

Even we cam from a sunny country, snow, rain is not an issue(we are issue to it). The important is that the family is together and happy.

I am thinking not accept this.

Again thank you all for the above answers.

JL
Go to the top of the page
+

2 Pages V   1 2 >
Reply to this topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 

Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions is an innovative business company which provides valuable assistance with the Swedish Authorities, Swedish language practice and general communications. Call 073-100 47 81 or visit:
swedishdowntown.com
PSD Media
PSD Media is marketing company that offers innovative solutions for online retailers. We provide modern solutions that help increase traffic and raise conversion. Visit our site at:
psdmedia.se
If you want to drink, that’s your business.
If you want to stop, we can help.

Learn more about English-language Alcoholics Anonymous in Sweden. No dues. No fees. Confidentiality assured.
aa-europe.org/sweden