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Bad language in the media

Thinking about the kids

skogsbo
post 4.Feb.2013, 07:49 AM
Post #16
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

but they are only words, once said the sound disappears into the ether. It is only the significance that society attaches and unattaches to swear words that make them more or less socially acceptable. We don't swear as rule and the kids don't either, they know words they might hear at dagis or with older cousins aren't acceptable with us. But to me they are still only words, even if I don't use them (apart from when I bang my finger with a hammer).

What is worse I think, is Swedes complete lack of understanding of English swear words and their significance, you'll often hear severe english swear words on the radio during the day, or blasted out in songs in public places. They just don't think saying cr&p is any different to kcuf. Like all words, if you don't understand the meaning of it, don't use it.
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 4.Feb.2013, 08:29 AM
Post #17
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

QUOTE (Beef @ 3.Feb.2013, 09:06 PM) *
So can you explain the history? Seems that it's ok today to use "fan, jävla, helvete, skit" in front of kids. Are you saying that it wasn't a generation ago ... (show full quote)

I think you should read and understand my next to last sentence!
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Yorkshireman
post 4.Feb.2013, 08:36 AM
Post #18
Joined: 22.Nov.2011

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 4.Feb.2013, 07:49 AM) *
What is worse I think, is Swedes complete lack of understanding of English swear words and their significance, you'll often hear severe english swear words on the radio du ... (show full quote)

It is the fact that the English words have no real meaning in Swedish, so they are not offensive in the same way to Swedish language speakers, as they are to Us ...Is it so that in this modern world of multiculturalism we must take into account every single culture and language around the world!!! For Me, Swedish swear words have much less impact than English versions and I tend to use them instead of the English counterparts wink.gif

The world is indeed changing, I learned my swear words when at school and from my brothers and sisters ...only later from films etc... In Sweden they are more realistic they know kids learn the naughty words and it is part of everyday life ...even more quicker they learn now due to exposure via internet etc... England is still way behind reality, trying to hide boobs on TV until after 9pm, and hide strong language like it doesn't exist!, even though their parents may utter the dreaded words every now and then .. biggrin.gif
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 4.Feb.2013, 08:40 AM
Post #19
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

QUOTE (John.Smith @ 4.Feb.2013, 07:41 AM) *
Living up North, swearing is just a part of the everyday pool of words that folk here use to express themselves.. Here there seems to be two strands of usage:1. Half the popul ... (show full quote)

Well, I dunno!

I know a few Irish guys who would be speechless if they could not say "fook or fooken" laugh.gif
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John.Smith
post 4.Feb.2013, 09:17 AM
Post #20
Location: Sweden
Joined: 12.Sep.2011

So do I, and Brits and Scots and Americans, and Australians... I tend not to curse except when I am angry such as yesterday finding that my son had been running his quadbike without an airfilter and Daddy had to pull the carb out and 'de-gunk' it... A few choice words were aimed at the offending carb. I never curse in front of my kids in either Swedish or English.
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John.Smith
post 4.Feb.2013, 09:18 AM
Post #21
Location: Sweden
Joined: 12.Sep.2011

QUOTE (Gamla Hälsingebock @ 4.Feb.2013, 08:40 AM) *
Well, I dunno!. I know a few Irish guys who would be speechless if they could not say "fook or fooken" laugh.gif

Don't forget the Scots overuse of the big 'C' word either...
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mångk
post 4.Feb.2013, 12:25 PM
Post #22
Joined: 27.Jul.2008

Language is what it is... I don't think that one can directly translate skit > crap. Skit is more of a flexible adjective, not as crude (at least to me) and often used as a superlative. Skitgott is a good example!

When one thinks about it the worst word in the english language used to be very common even as a street name: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gropecunt_Lane or perhaps one fancies a little http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tickle_Cock_Bridge
unsure.gif
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byke
post 4.Feb.2013, 12:43 PM
Post #23
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

QUOTE (Beef @ 3.Feb.2013, 11:34 AM) *
Hi, Brought this up before once or twice but looking for some opinion and guidance...My kids love to watch their family TV which is something I've learnt to put up with. W ... (show full quote)

Swedish is a nano language, which holds next to no value in the wider world.
With Swedish also being somewhat crippled by the lack of vocabulary used in an everyday context, it does often lead to a pollution of poor translation, brought forth from Swedish. This also explains why we see such a large use of native Swedes often having to use non swedish words to describe their views (mid sentence).

(bork bork bork, "kick ass darling" bork bork bork)

I personally would advocate that if your children do swear in Swedish, to allow them to keep doing so.
It may show a severe lack of class or manners, but luckily its limited to a specific nation which seems to span across all classes.

However, the point I would make is to ensure you teach them that other languages can not be translated to on the fly with such terminology. And that such comprehension in languages other than Swedish have different rules - but also things such as class and finesse.
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Johno
post 4.Feb.2013, 01:02 PM
Post #24
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

If " I don't think that one can directly translate skit > crap." refers to what I posted, it was only to show that directly translating to the obvious "shit" does not work, and was trying to find a better equivalent. In Swedish, skitprat, skitsnack are just forceful and when you see a newspaper headline like "Helen Sjöholm: Melodifestival? Nej, då skiter jag på mig" you know that its just attention grabbing. To me using skit words just comes across as a bit vulgar, where you would choose another way of expressing yourself in polite company ?
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Beef
post 4.Feb.2013, 01:06 PM
Post #25
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 7.Feb.2006

Well, after looking at all your opinions and thanks by the way. There is no answer to my actual question.

Basically, myself and other parents correct our kids when they use these words but there is no media backup as there is in other countries. And that's not looking like changing at any point soon.

Thanks again for your replies!
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Pursuivant
post 4.Feb.2013, 01:31 PM
Post #26
Joined: 12.Aug.2008

Swedes curse? Feh, they just go "oh seventeen" like old ladies... they do have the "catholic" trait in that they use religious terminology. Imagine now someone in English yelling "Oh Sacrament!" like they do in Germany. Swedes really lack in the finesse, even they've loaned fitta off the Finns and try use it. Whereas English cursing is funny - saying "Oh Fornication"... each to their own, in Russia everything is cursed by the male organ.

QUOTE
Am I out of touch??

Not really, like you probably wrap your furniture in drapes to avoid using the word "leg" and can't go to the coop as they sell chicken breast biggrin.gif

QUOTE
There have been so many times where I hear a song in Sweden that I've listened to on the radio in NY for years and never even realized there was cursing in it because its all censored out

.
So thats your own music from your own country so what are you complaining about? Celebrate multiculturalism!

QUOTE
it's a sign of class

How are the Swedes supposed to know the difference when they themselves claim to have a "classless society"? Besides which, how can "Oh Fornication" be a curse when a real bad curse would be "The Devil"?

QUOTE
know a few Irish guys who would be speechless if they could not say "fook or fooken"


I think you are meaning "feck", and its a bit of a different word than the English one that sounds the same. Do they call you a "cute hoor" as well?

QUOTE
My mother hated bad language and took to feeding me soap whenever I would use such words.

My grandmother too... I think you get nailed for child abuse with the social these days for something like that.

At the end of the day "your mother's milk" as they say in Spain wink.gif
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mångk
post 4.Feb.2013, 01:58 PM
Post #27
Joined: 27.Jul.2008

QUOTE (Johno @ 4.Feb.2013, 01:02 PM) *
If " I don't think that one can directly translate skit > crap." refers to what I posted, it was only to show that directly translating to the obvious "s ... (show full quote)

Wasn't directly refering to your post. It is an excellent example of the problem. biggrin.gif

I think a lot has to do with context. Skitsnack or snackar skit can mean both bullshit and small talk. But it appears to be used more nowadays to refer to negative talk.

I would probably still use skitgott in 'polite company' if something was suprising really good! Sometimes it is as much about how you say it! laugh.gif
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John.Smith
post 4.Feb.2013, 02:21 PM
Post #28
Location: Sweden
Joined: 12.Sep.2011

QUOTE (Pursuivant @ 4.Feb.2013, 01:31 PM) *
I think you are meaning "feck", and its a bit of a different word than the English one that sounds the same. Do they call you a "cute hoor" as well?

I think he is referring to F*ck but with a Dublin North side knacker accent. Feck is different yet the same. it is not a curse as such in that it is no more offensive than say the use of the word 'bloody'. It can be used in many the same ways as F*ck however:
1. Feck you
2. Feck off
3. Feckin' thing/yoke
4. How the feck? (are you)
5. You are some Fecker for one fecker
6. Feck that yoke over there will ya? etc

It however has zero sexual connotations. You cannot for example 'feck' someone... It is doubtful that it originates from the original 'f*ck* word in its context.
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John.Smith
post 4.Feb.2013, 02:23 PM
Post #29
Location: Sweden
Joined: 12.Sep.2011

How come the word 'jerk' is not offensive but 'wanker' is? They both mean the same thing?
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Pursuivant
post 4.Feb.2013, 03:46 PM
Post #30
Joined: 12.Aug.2008

And how come "bugger" isn't as offensive as compared to f* ?
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