• Sweden edition
 
The comments below have not been moderated in advance and are not produced by The Local unless clearly stated.
Readers are responsible for the content of their own comments. Comments that breach our terms and conditions will be removed.
5 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > »    Reply to this topic

Two-year-old misbehaving - keeps feeding dogs

He's giving his food to the dogs! Deliberately!

John.Smith
post 13.Feb.2013, 02:38 PM
Post #16
Location: Sweden
Joined: 12.Sep.2011

Dogs def should not have the run of the house at meal times. Our dogs get fed AFTER we have eaten without exception. This is the simplest form of securing their position in the pack. The lower you are, the later you eat.

I would disagree on one thing however Skogsbo. Working dogs on a farm living outside is fine by me. However, my dogs are not working dogs, they are pets, and part of the pleasure of having them as pets for me is to have them live inside the house. But as I have mentioned, they know the rules when they are inside and abide by them.
Go to the top of the page
+
skogsbo
post 13.Feb.2013, 02:42 PM
Post #17
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

I'll agree there , our collies as a kid, never went upstairs,and slept in porch or kitchen where it was cooler, better for them regulating their body temps, no one gives them a coat and hat when they go outside in winter! I don't think either approach is bad, training is key.
Go to the top of the page
+
John.Smith
post 13.Feb.2013, 02:46 PM
Post #18
Location: Sweden
Joined: 12.Sep.2011

Yep. My Bearded Collie bitch only sleeps inside and eats inside. With the exception of heavy rain she chooses to stay outside. She has made a nest on top one of the snow piles so she can look-out. smile.gif

The American-Lab is a great dog for trekking and hiking with and he is extremely fit, but when not hiking with me he is in the house in his bed sleeping.

Two dogs completely opposite personalities but best of buddies.

Edit: Miss my old Rough coated/Border Collie mix... he was the smartest dog I have owned. Love collies, they make the best companions and working dogs.
Go to the top of the page
+
what would thomas paine d...
post 13.Feb.2013, 03:42 PM
Post #19
Joined: 15.Oct.2012

To the OP - I don't have children so can't speak from life experience. But another parent posted your question on a different thread on a different site (seems like mostly-or-all mothers), and most all of them actually saw the problem as more of a child problem than a dog problem - that the child needed to learn/understand appropriate ways to handle and value their food. I think one parent let her child give the dog treats later on. So, maybe a child too has to learn what's their food and what's the dog's food and when the dog can or cannot have a treat... The moms saw the issue as linked to general food manners a child needs to learn... Just thought I'd throw that into the mix.

Can read for yourself though, if interested... http://www.mamapedia.com/article/toddler-w...feeding-the-dog
Go to the top of the page
+
Svensksmith
post 13.Feb.2013, 04:11 PM
Post #20
Joined: 28.Jul.2011

You can tell a lot about a person by how he treats his dog.

And, Dave, who is the boss in your house? Set some rules. If you don't now, you will regret it when your kid is a teenager.
Go to the top of the page
+
skogsbo
post 13.Feb.2013, 05:25 PM
Post #21
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (what would thomas paine do @ 13.Feb.2013, 03:42 PM) *
To the OP - I don't have children so can't speak from life experience. But another parent posted your question on a different thread on a different site (seems like mo ... (show full quote)

QUOTE (Svensksmith @ 13.Feb.2013, 04:11 PM) *
You can tell a lot about a person by how he treats his dog.. And, Dave, who is the boss in your house? Set some rules. If you don't now, you will regret it when your kid is a teenager.

it's not a child or a dog problem, it's an owner problem. Dogs and Child are born as empty vessels, but they soak up the environment around them .Little hand gestures, hidden meanings, they spot it all and repeat.

The first time the dog took food off the kid at the table, it was tolerated. If the kid had been told a simple 'no' in the right tone and the dog sent to it's bed. Problem solved. Repeated a few more times and both would have learnt what acceptable behaviour is.

Dogs and children are always learning, so they'll test boundaries occasionally, let it go once and you make a rod for your back. Consistency is key.

Dave have you ever thrown the dog a scrap from your plate?
Go to the top of the page
+
skogsbo
post 13.Feb.2013, 05:35 PM
Post #22
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

I should add Dave, don't take it personally or to heart, every parent will do stuff with their kids, then a few weeks later, think I wish hadn't allowed that, started this etc. it just happens yours is related to dogs and food. That's why if you trawl all these bored mums' forums there are 100s of different ideas on how to teach kids to eat, dress, potty train.. etc.. there are no set ways and EVERY parent makes some mistakes along the way, but has just as many successes, that's kids for you!!

ps. Dogs are easier to train than kids. smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
+
Pursuivant
post 13.Feb.2013, 05:46 PM
Post #23
Joined: 12.Aug.2008

I'd be far more worried if the 2-year old would go get munchies from the dogs bowl laugh.gif
Go to the top of the page
+
intrepidfox
post 13.Feb.2013, 06:20 PM
Post #24
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 18.Jul.2012

QUOTE (Svensksmith @ 13.Feb.2013, 04:11 PM) *
And, Dave, who is the boss in your house? Set some rules. If you don't now, you will regret it when your kid is a teenager.

Well it´s not Dave. I don´t want to be rude but he has so many problems and is so insecure. I wonder how he managed to be successful in life as he is very immature. Just read his other posts.
Go to the top of the page
+
dave.smith
post 13.Feb.2013, 07:10 PM
Post #25
Joined: 12.Jan.2007

I do tell son and dogs "no" when the transgressions take place. I even explain to him why it's wrong in easy-to-understand baby language.

"No. Don't give your brother your food. It's not good for him, he's a puppy, so he eats puppy food. You are a human so you eat human food. You can't give that human food to a puppy unless it's meat or chicken."

He listens but just laughs, thinks the whole thing is a joke. The dogs do listen and stop taking the food - temporarily. They always take a chance the next time around!
Go to the top of the page
+
skogsbo
post 13.Feb.2013, 08:43 PM
Post #26
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

Of course your son thinks its a joke, he's only 2 or 3! He only wants fun. Just sit next to him when he eats and stop it before the food even leaves his hand. But, if the dogs are elsewhere at meal times, there is no problem?,
Go to the top of the page
+
Elf_Moon
post 13.Feb.2013, 09:01 PM
Post #27
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 5.Sep.2012

I agree that dogs need to be well trained. Otherwise you will end up suffering the same problem I once had wherein the dog thinks it is the boss!

I took on a 12 yo dog a few years back, he didn't steal my food but in the night he would jump up onto my bed while I slept and push me off -.- If I tried to move him while he was sleeping he would growl at me :/ So the dog usually got most of the bed while I slept on the edge of it sad.gif If I tried to lock him out of my room he would keep me awake with crying (and who can ignore the cry of a dog desperate for love!?)

That was one naughty dog... Next time I get a puppy and I train it from day one- instead of adopting a naughty one with bad habits... Though I've had a few adopted dogs now, they have each been wonderful members of my family smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
+
Bender B Rodriquez
post 13.Feb.2013, 09:43 PM
Post #28
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

Just keep the dogs out of the kitchen while you eat. If your son asks why the dogs are not allowed in the kitchen while you eat, just tell him why.
Go to the top of the page
+
dave.smith
post 14.Feb.2013, 07:23 AM
Post #29
Joined: 12.Jan.2007

I just don't know if he understands though... He also loves to play this "game" with the vaccuum cleaner, where he and the dog conspire to flip it over so it can't move... I have explained to him that it could damage the vaccuum cleaner but he thinks it's great fun to just flip it over.

Perhaps I am explaining in a way that's not getting through to him? How do you really explain such things to a 2 year old?

My wife is partly to blame since she spends the most time with him, and let's him completely run riot.
Go to the top of the page
+
skogsbo
post 14.Feb.2013, 07:48 AM
Post #30
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (dave.smith @ 14.Feb.2013, 07:23 AM) *
Perhaps I am explaining in a way that's not getting through to him? How do you really explain such things to a 2 year old?

dave he is 2, not 22, there is nothing more complex to it.

Ours still think it's great fun, to turn the vacuum cleaner off if you run the cable out into a another room, or sneak up behind you and push the slider which reduces the power down, they then run away. It's kids playing, the bigger the adult reaction, the more fun YOU are making it.

We you ever a child too?
Go to the top of the page
+

5 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > » 
Reply to this topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 

762
jobs available
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions is an innovative business company which provides valuable assistance with the Swedish Authorities, Swedish language practice and general communications. Call 073-100 47 81 or visit:
www.swedishdowntown.com