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To Bring or Not to Bring an American TV

Cost Benefit Analysis Ensues

iamthestieg
post 14.Feb.2013, 06:07 AM
Post #1
Joined: 2.Feb.2012

Hi Folks.

I'm planning on moving to Sweden this summer and want to buy a television in America to bring over.

Here's what I know.

Sweden uses the PAL system and runs on 240 volts and 50hz. So if I bought a "regular" TV in America, I'd need a voltage converter and a PAL to NTSC converter. I'd probably also need a digital tuner to plug into the PAL to NTSC convert.

Another option is that I buy a multi-system TV in America; one that auto detects the voltage and hz rate. In some respect, it's like a global TV, or unlocked GSM phone. Anyway, such TVs are significantly more expensive than uni-system TVs (NTSC or PAL only).

Q1) Would my plan to bring a NTSC tv over to Sweden work if A) I have voltage converter with high enough capacity, like 100 watts cool.gif digital tuner boxes are sold are reasonable price or get "cable" TV C) and PAL to NTSC converter works.

Q2) Same questions as Q1 but for the newer TVs that refresh at 240hz or 120hz. http://reviews.cnet.com/240hz-lcd-tvs-what-you-need-to-know/

Q3) a 500 watt voltage converter is about 200 SEK and a "PAL to NTSC" converter is 400 SEK. For the size telly I want to get, 55-60 inches, the price premium for multi-system is 2500 sek. Worth it to pay 1900 sek to avoid risk of both converters not working?

Q4) Should I just buy a TV in Sweden? I don't know what website I can check prices but in America, a 55 inch 120hz Samsung LED LCD TV would cost me 5490 SEK, plus 600 more for the voltage and signal converters.

Given: I'd need to buy PAL based Swedish digital tuner and pay the SVT fee no matter what kind of TV I buy or where I buy it (US vs Sweden)

Thanks for your opinion or recount of our experience.

Regards,

Stieg
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Yorkshireman
post 14.Feb.2013, 09:29 AM
Post #2
Joined: 22.Nov.2011

One point that You might want to consider is the potential pitfalls with having a product bought in the USA is with regards coverage by warranties and store guarrantees, let alone insurance for transport, reduced 2nd hand value in Sweden and how domestic home insurance values the product in case of accident or theft.
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skogsbo
post 14.Feb.2013, 10:43 AM
Post #3
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

depending on what TV you want to watch when you get here, it is unlikely that you TV's card slot / software will be not compatible with the likes of Boxer's subscription card. Our UK TV wasn't, we had to get a stand alone card reader.
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iamthestieg
post 14.Feb.2013, 04:28 PM
Post #4
Joined: 2.Feb.2012

Good points. Let me clarify then. I'd be shipping all my stuff in a shipping container so regarding cost of transport and insurance, that'll be a non-issue.

Regarding warranties, typically 1 year from manufacturer only. I'd buy it soon to get more use out of the TV and its warranty. Data shows warranty repairs typically occur within 6 months. Moreover, Samsung is top notch TV maker with low defect rates (per US consumer group).

I would not be concerned with 2nd hand value because the life span of LED lit LCD TV is very long. Besides, I'd buy an advance TV to mitigate obsolescence . But about domestic home insurance values, wouldn't a Swedish bought TV incur similar cost, if not more because it costed more.

I don't know much about how Swedish TV and TV service is provided. Card readers are mentioned. American TVs dont' use cards. But the satellite receiver boxes do. But that's moot because I won't be bringing over a sat box.

Would you kindly refer me to a source on all things Swedish TV? I'm not even sure what to query for.

Thanks for the replies Localites.
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skogsbo
post 14.Feb.2013, 04:53 PM
Post #5
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (iamthestieg @ 14.Feb.2013, 04:28 PM) *
I don't know much about how Swedish TV and TV service is provided. Card readers are mentioned. American TVs dont' use cards. But the satellite receiver boxes do. But t ... (show full quote)

you can get something like Sky, via a normal aeriel, a card goes either into a box, but most newer TVs in Europe have a card slot, or CI port where an adapter goes in with the card. The TV then reads the card, to see what channels it is allowed to show you.

Google Boxer to see what they offer.

ww.tv.nu to see what is on right now. It depends on how much TV you watch, we watch very little, we survived the first year with no TV, as we were working all the time, over the 2nd year we progressed to standard digital and then a selective Boxer deal, where you can just pick 8 channels you want, without buying all the cra* that usually goes with a package. As a rule, apart from their skiing coverage, Swedish TV isn't great.
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olga118
post 14.Feb.2013, 10:56 PM
Post #6
Joined: 27.Jan.2012

You are assuming the warranty will cover use of the TV outside of the USA. You may be wrong. If you are going to do this you had better check and make sure the warranty covers use out of the USA...I would be surprised if it did.
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skumdum
post 14.Feb.2013, 11:59 PM
Post #7
Joined: 28.Jun.2011

PAL broadcasts were discontinued 10 years ago in Sweden.
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 15.Feb.2013, 12:29 AM
Post #8
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

All modern TVs are made for the international market nowadays and support all analog and digital formats as well as all voltages. Also, all major brands have international warranties on their products.

The only electronics that can be difficult to bring is printers and DVD/Blueray players, since the manufacturers have region locks on ink and discs, although it can be circumvented.
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Willy
post 15.Feb.2013, 01:29 AM
Post #9
Joined: 10.Jul.2005

Agreed.

OP, exactly what do you mean by "multi-system TV" and "PAL to NTSC converter"? Your terminology is at least a decade out of date.

It would be easier if you could provide links to the specifications of the models that you are considering.
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djmarko
post 15.Feb.2013, 09:19 AM
Post #10
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 18.Jan.2007

always buy electronics in Sweden!!! i have bought a few products from the US that packed up after 2-3 weeks
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Rick Methven
post 15.Feb.2013, 12:51 PM
Post #11
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

A lot of modern TV's run via a power adapter on a lower voltage than mains. These adapters use voltage sensors to automatically provide the correct output voltage and can take an input of 110-230v to provide the correct DC current for the TV. others which have direct mains input often have a 110/230v switch. A TV designed for US analog signal is not compatible in Sweden but if it has a digital tuner it will work. All Swedish TV channels are digital only nowadays.

Having said that, is it really worth the hassle and uncertainty plus the cost of transporting it. good quality 110/230 converters cost quite a bit also which you may have to buy. They need to be certified for European/Swedish use. If it is not certified and you have an electrical fire, your insurance will not pay out.
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redblue
post 15.Feb.2013, 01:09 PM
Post #12
Joined: 27.Jul.2007

Why not just sell it on craigslist and buy an equivalent TV on blocket. Much less hassle.
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Monark540
post 15.Feb.2013, 03:07 PM
Post #13
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 20.Mar.2009

Suggest that you buy and bring laptop(s), iPads, dual system stereos, cameras and the like. As far as TVs are concerned, I would buy here. BTW, I'm an American, living in Sweden, and for many years used to lug around transformers and U.S. appliances/electronics when I had a corporate moving allowance and worked around Europe. The bulk and hum of the transformers gets old after a while in the average-sized Swedish flat.

Obvious point, but key to remember - if you have dual system devices that aren't auto-sensing, do remember to place the switch to the correct voltage before plugging in!
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Rick Methven
post 15.Feb.2013, 03:55 PM
Post #14
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

QUOTE
Obvious point, but key to remember - if you have dual system devices that aren't auto-sensing, do remember to place the switch to the correct voltage before plugging in!

But do not worry as you will be alerted to your mistake quite quickly by the burning smell biggrin.gif
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 15.Feb.2013, 05:08 PM
Post #15
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

I challenge you to find a modern LCD TV that does not have automatic voltage conversion and that does not accept all kinds of transmissions. In fact I challenge you to find a TV that is not CE marked.
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