• Sweden edition
 
The comments below have not been moderated in advance and are not produced by The Local unless clearly stated.
Readers are responsible for the content of their own comments. Comments that breach our terms and conditions will be removed.
  Reply to this topic

What are nursery schools like in Sweden?

Do little children have a good life in Sweden

sarahgash
post 3.Mar.2013, 10:55 AM
Post #1
Joined: 21.Feb.2013

I've heard that nursery school is very good in Sweden but don't know what is so good about it? Anybody here know why it's got a good reputation. Anybody had their children in a Swedish nursery?
Go to the top of the page
+
byke
post 3.Mar.2013, 01:24 PM
Post #2
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

I have.
Short answer is you get what you pay for.
Go to the top of the page
+
JulieLou40
post 3.Mar.2013, 02:07 PM
Post #3
Location: Luleå
Joined: 19.Oct.2009

That answer doesn't make sense, when the charges are calculated on what you earn, with a ceiling charge of just over 1200 per month as I understand it.
Go to the top of the page
+
byke
post 3.Mar.2013, 02:09 PM
Post #4
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

I see it as a freebee.
Go to the top of the page
+
JulieLou40
post 3.Mar.2013, 02:17 PM
Post #5
Location: Luleå
Joined: 19.Oct.2009

Huh?
Go to the top of the page
+
byke
post 3.Mar.2013, 03:48 PM
Post #6
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

Having had children who have been to Swedish dagis.
I cant say I have been impressed.

Yes its free, or very low cost and easy to source a place.
But I see more issues with it than I do positives.

I agree that Dagis does offer a great place for other children to socialise which is very important in regards to development etc. And because society has changed greatly in Sweden in the past 30 years in terms of parents using such systems, it has now become a monopoly. Resulting in less choice for individual children.

The possibility of a parent turning up to the park with their child on a weekday, hoping for their child to find another child to play with are pretty rare nowadays. Unless their is a daycare group of children there.

If we were a low income family where both parents had to work long hours, then I am sure it would be a god send. But for any other families it reduces choice to a large amount as most dagis's work within the local county and tax system which is subsidised. Often resulting in a lack of differences in terms of quality or needs.

We as a family sent out kids to dagis, not because we needed the ability to work.
But because we needed them to be able to interact with other children.
And because this is no longer available since it is considered "wrong" to stay home with your kids, generally there are no other families able to do it either. Without being detrimental to the child's well being.

Eventually we found solutions and work arounds for all our kids.
That allowed them to all grow as individuals in terms of interaction with others and basic education, and gave them the security of family life without being placed into long hour government care.

But again, while Swedish dagis's do offer a very no fuss standard across the board, the quality can be very questionable and it removes diversity in regards to looking actively for different options (since they dont really exist)

And with Sweden slowly inching (reluctantly) to earlier education to help address failings in primary school years (7+) we are now seeing more education filtering down into daycare. However the costs of hiring qualified staff to implement such is causing issues as the cost is too high.

Sweden does have to invest more in education.
But the offset is ever greater battery farming.

http://www.metro.se/nyheter/manga-sma-skol...ApOz0WMfxUnvIQ/
Go to the top of the page
+
sarahgash
post 4.Mar.2013, 09:27 PM
Post #7
Joined: 21.Feb.2013

That's very interesting, they start the curriculum at 3 in Scotland, although not compulsary many parents choose it. The chance for children to learn from each other under proffesional guidance is a very good thing I think. Is logis the name for daycare or nursery? Does the state pay for the teachers?
Go to the top of the page
+
Yorkshireman
post 4.Mar.2013, 10:09 PM
Post #8
Joined: 22.Nov.2011

QUOTE (byke @ 3.Mar.2013, 03:48 PM) *
Having had children who have been to Swedish dagis.. I cant say I have been impressed.. Yes its free, or very low cost and easy to source a place.. But I see more issues with it than I do positives.

The thing here is that it is easy to complain about the one provided and subsidised by the State, but You always have the option of creating your own Hemmadagis, if I remember correctly it only takes a minimum of 5 children, an inspection and a degree of paperwork (= patience) ...and You can set up your dagis to be the way you want it to be. As long as there are other parents that are willing to join in wink.gif Most local kommuns will gladly help you with the process.
Go to the top of the page
+
byke
post 4.Mar.2013, 10:11 PM
Post #9
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

Dagis is basically the name covering care from the age of 1 to 5 years of age.
At 6 years, many children go to school (like an introduction) but this is not compulsory as curriculum education starts from 7 years old.

Most of these places are supported by taxes.
With parents topping up based on their income.

So the state helps provide cash for teachers "carers" with some being qualified and others not.
Go to the top of the page
+
byke
post 4.Mar.2013, 10:15 PM
Post #10
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

QUOTE (Yorkshireman @ 4.Mar.2013, 10:09 PM) *
The thing here is that it is easy to complain about the one provided and subsidised by the State, but You always have the option of creating your own Hemmadagis, if I remember ... (show full quote)

While its a nice option, the reality of it is often unfeasible.
Even language laws have started to worm their way in to how children can be cared for.
Go to the top of the page
+
Yorkshireman
post 5.Mar.2013, 01:35 AM
Post #11
Joined: 22.Nov.2011

QUOTE (byke @ 3.Mar.2013, 03:48 PM) *
And with Sweden slowly inching (reluctantly) to earlier education to help address failings in primary school years (7+) we are now seeing more education filtering down into da ... (show full quote)

Sweden's problem isn't the late start in education but rather education in the right areas! And jobs available! In fact, there is more and more debate about whether boyz should start later than girls in further education since results are dropping when compared side-by-side, which is likely due to boyz being less mature at the same teen-ages as girls. It could be wiser to let the boys mature more 1st wink.gif ...like wait until they are 60+ rolleyes.gif

UK by camparison has a worse problem, there are now so many higher education facilities that are competing for research grants, more and more students each year admitted, especially on questionable subjects, and higher degree passes are rising suspiciously quick in proportion to the past. Employers are now concerned that the results are marked upwards favourably to give a better reputation to the institutions, which indirectly has had the effect that UK degrees are now starting to fall into disrepute.

Personally, I had my kids in dagis in Stockholm and I found the dagis perfectly OK dry.gif ...I am not a fan of the 7yr school start, 5yr seems more reasonable, but even in Ye ol' Yorkshire there are many schools now starting at 3 with more formalised education!
Go to the top of the page
+
sarahgash
post 6.Mar.2013, 08:51 PM
Post #12
Joined: 21.Feb.2013

Is it usual to have English language spoken in dagis?
Go to the top of the page
+
byke
post 6.Mar.2013, 09:03 PM
Post #13
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

Depends on location and sales point.
I dont think all English dagis' are allowed to operate by law any more in Sweden unless they have a specific license (very rare). So what you end up with is a Swedish speaking dagis that sometimes offers other languages (such as English). But Swedish being the main language as to conform to local language laws.

Normally such places are described as "Engleska" or "International".
They are not allowed to call them British or even English (I think) as that requires a specific license which as far as I know only 1? place in the whole of sweden has.

Generally speaking what usually happens is Swedish speaking dagis's open up but offer a second language (usually undefined) and then its dressed up with a business name to give it a false sense of legitimacy.
Go to the top of the page
+
sarahgash
post 9.Mar.2013, 09:59 AM
Post #14
Joined: 21.Feb.2013

Can anyone give a brief explaination of the 'language laws' mentioned in previous replies?
Go to the top of the page
+
Yorkshireman
post 9.Mar.2013, 01:18 PM
Post #15
Joined: 22.Nov.2011

Here is Stockholm Stads response on language in addition to Swedish:

Enligt förskolans läroplan ska barn med annat modersmål än svenska få möjlighet att både utveckla det svenska språket och sitt modersmål. Förskolan ska sträva efter att varje barn som har ett annat modersmål än svenska utvecklar sin kulturella identitet samt sin förmåga att kommunicera såväl på svenska som på sitt modersmål.

...so, just to talk with the dagis and make the request, and they will check the possibility. It doesn't guarrantee anything, just that they will try ...often in schools they have a minimum requirement before they will arrange the special lessons for mother-tongue, due to resourcing & costs, sometimes they cannot find the teachers either sad.gif ...a few years ago my kids had English taught by a Frenchman biggrin.gif ... was a little bit of a worry at first (but then their English is very good anyway) ...just didn't want them ending-up speaking like the policeman in 'Allo,'Allo!
wink.gif
Go to the top of the page
+

Reply to this topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 

738
jobs available
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions is an innovative business company which provides valuable assistance with the Swedish Authorities, Swedish language practice and general communications. Call 073-100 47 81 or visit:
www.swedishdowntown.com