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Renting in Malmo?

Housing in Sweden for dummies!

inmortus
post 1.Mar.2014, 10:29 PM
Post #1
Joined: 12.Feb.2014

Hello,

I will be moving to Malmo for a job in June. I have never been to Sweden, and was a bit surprised to read posts about how difficult it is to find apartments to rent. I read something about queue lists, how getting an apartment for rent might take years, and I am not sure I fully understand how all of this works.

I'm sorry to ask what may be a silly question, but can someone give me a "renting apartments in Sweden" for dummies?

What exactly are the difficulties and why?

What is the best way to find an apartment for rent as a foreigner that does not speak Swedish?

Also, Malmo specific, how difficult is it to find an apartment in Malmo, where should I look for an apartment (my salary will be around 30,000 SEK) and how much should I expect to pay?

I read about renting "second hand" but (not even being a native English speaker) I am not sure I understand what that means or entails...

Thanks in advance!
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Opalnera
post 2.Mar.2014, 01:24 AM
Post #2
Joined: 16.Aug.2010

Renting second hand means that someone else has a contract/lease on an apartment and you rent from that person. Renting is a serious headache. If you have 30 000 SEK a month salary and are going to be in Sweden for more than a year I'd buy an apartment. Looks like Malmö is as cheap as chips, you can pick up a 1 room apartment for 500-600k SEK. You need a 15% deposit though.

Check out www.blocket.se for second hand rentals - www.hemnet.se if you are in a position to buy.
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inmortus
post 2.Mar.2014, 05:43 AM
Post #3
Joined: 12.Feb.2014

Thanks. Buying may be an option but... would a bank in Sweden give a loan to a foreigner who just moved in to Sweden for a new job?... How much of a headache would it be to buy a place in these conditions?

What do you mean when you say that renting is a headache? I mean, how long can it take to actually find a place second hand?

Thanks.
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Ivor stephé
post 2.Mar.2014, 10:04 AM
Post #4
Joined: 20.Aug.2013

I doubt you could get a loan that quickly. Well not at least from a Swedish bank.
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inmortus
post 3.Mar.2014, 12:13 AM
Post #5
Joined: 12.Feb.2014

Thanks. Back to the idea of renting then. Once again, as a foreigner with no experience in Sweden, what exactly is the headache of finding an apartment for rent in a city like Malmo?
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Ivor stephé
post 3.Mar.2014, 12:34 AM
Post #6
Joined: 20.Aug.2013

Lack of available places to rent.
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LLHope
post 3.Mar.2014, 10:30 AM
Post #7
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 1.Jan.2014

QUOTE (inmortus @ 3.Mar.2014, 12:13 AM) *
Thanks. Back to the idea of renting then. Once again, as a foreigner with no experience in Sweden, what exactly is the headache of finding an apartment for rent in a city like Malmo?


Let's see if I understand correctly. You accepted a job and even negotiated a salary for that job in a country that you have no experience of, a language you do not speak, have no idea about how to find accommodation or the expected cost, nor probably know the level of the general cost of living... Don't you just for a moment think that you have done this the wrong way round. In fact, the only thing you are certain of is that you are a foreigner rolleyes.gif ...whatever happened to common sense?
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inmortus
post 3.Mar.2014, 02:08 PM
Post #8
Joined: 12.Feb.2014

Thanks for that great answer that helps a lot and gives so much value to this discussion!

Really!

Yes, I am a foreigner, yes I have accepted a position in a different country of which I have very limited knowledge. I did of course check that the salary was appropriate (I never said I didn't), and I have several months to figure out the housing aspect of it... In my line of work it is quite common to move internationally every couple of years to a different new country; I don't really see anything bad about it, as I get to experience new cultures first hand and keeps my life from getting boring...

And regarding the language... well... if I were only to go to countries that speak my language then I'd never try new things, nor would anyone with any sense of adventure willing to experience cultural shock... I do speak English, so moving to Sweden does not seem as scary as say moving to mainland China...
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passport-stamps
post 3.Mar.2014, 07:35 PM
Post #9
Joined: 20.Feb.2014

QUOTE (LLHope @ 3.Mar.2014, 10:30 AM) *
Let's see if I understand correctly. You accepted a job and even negotiated a salary for that job in a country that you have no experience of, a language you do not speak, ... (show full quote)


Why do you people have to be so snarky and mean on these forums? You guys paint a very negative and nasty impression of Sweden. UGH!
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wallace1837
post 4.Mar.2014, 11:48 AM
Post #10
Joined: 21.Oct.2012

Hi,
The housing situation is bad in Sweden. Other systems are bad as well, but his one is bad in a different way, so it is hard for foreigner to understand.

There are about 4 types of housing in Sweden:
1. First hand rental contract: those are direct contract between the renter and the owner. They are regulated and regulations are mostly enforced. Those are the best things. They are cheap, well maintained. The downside is that you need to be on waiting list for years (20 years is not uncommon for Stockholm). So unless you were put on those list at birth, forget it. You can also buy your place in on the black market, usually involving the current tenant and more money that you want to (http://www.thelocal.se/20090203/17324).

2. Second hand rental contract. You rent from the person who has a direct contract with the owner. Since first hand contract take years/decade to obtain, people are not willing to let them go if they go abroad for a finite amount of time. In that case they sublet it. Those are the same apartment, but the regulation are not enforced as they should, especially regarding the price (the first hand cannot make money out of the sublet, he can only charge 10% more it the apartment is furnished). Don't expect to find that, the demand is so high compared to the offer that everyone is afraid of loosing their chance of getting an apartment if they declare the fraud. Those sub contract are short term, expect to move every 3 months if you take that route. You find those legitimate, along scam, on blocket.se (google translate is your friend there).

3. Right to live somewhere (http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bostadsr%C3%A4tt google translate is your friend): This is like condo, but you don't buy a property, you buy the right to live somewhere. Thus, when you buy you don't make a real estate transaction (reduce transaction cost). Thus this is a speculative market based on the condition of the building, the maintenance fees and the trendy area. If you put down 25% of the price and have a work contract in hand the bank does not ask too much question. When you look at those on hemnet.se, look at the fees "avgift". Some have low maintenance fees (higher selling price), others have high maintenance fees (lower price), some others are just really expensive from both end. Use the calculator on hemnet.se ,also don't forget that most people don't buy their right to live they just take interest only loan (i.e. they don't pay the principal on their loan, the average full refund time is on the order of 100 years), so don't forget to change the tool to finite refund time.

4. Buying a house. This is the usual real estate transaction. You own your property. They are found on hemnet.se. Those are real estate transaction with transaction fees, etc.

When you "buy" something, the move in date is usually 3 months later. There is bidding if there is interest in the property, thus the asking price will change, usually upward.

When you buy something, the government will pay 30% of the interest (skatterredution), but won't help you for the principal.

All that being said, ask your employer, or colleague to help you find an apartment, otherwise you are lost. I know people with well paid job who just immigrated elsewhere because of lack of proper and accessible housing in Sweden.
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cherrybubble
post 4.Mar.2014, 12:52 PM
Post #11
Joined: 17.Oct.2012

QUOTE (inmortus @ 3.Mar.2014, 02:08 PM) *
I don't really see anything bad about it, as I get to experience new cultures first hand and keeps my life from getting boring...And regarding the language... well... if I ... (show full quote)

Fantastic answer and fantastic attitude! Yup, this (all of it) is an adventure!

With that attitude, you will be just fine here in Sweden (and honestly, anywhere else you travel)
=)
Welcome fellow traveller and adventurer!
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inmortus
post 4.Mar.2014, 01:13 PM
Post #12
Joined: 12.Feb.2014

Thanks for the great info!!!
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passport-stamps
post 4.Mar.2014, 01:30 PM
Post #13
Joined: 20.Feb.2014

QUOTE (wallace1837 @ 4.Mar.2014, 11:48 AM) *
Hi, The housing situation is bad in Sweden. Other systems are bad as well, but his one is bad in a different way, so it is hard for foreigner to understand.There are about ... (show full quote)



Wow! you guys quite a bleak and absolutely horrid picture of life in Sweden. If all of this is true then yikes!!
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xtenzion2
post 6.Mar.2014, 03:32 AM
Post #14
Joined: 27.Aug.2013

The easiest way to get housing in Malmo would be to rent a room. Most Swedes have big fears of sharing an apartment or house with other people. So there is a lot of less people to compete with. Most Swedes want to live lonely lifes in their own apartments.

I personally would rent a room in a house, it's so much nicer to live in a house, you will also have access to laundry anytime, have a big kitchen, have a lawn etc. You will also save money by renting a room, it's also make it a lot easier to get friends when you living with other people, they can probably help you out with questions etc.

Here you have few ads for room for rent. The averige price seems to be 3500 sek / 550 dollars a month. There might be a bit of wiggle room for negotiations. It's actually quite expensive, me and my wife rent out rooms here on the east coast of Australia for 135 dollars a week, with electricity, internet and everything else included.

http://www.blocket.se/bostad/uthyres?q=rum...m=282&m=285
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inmortus
post 6.Mar.2014, 04:01 AM
Post #15
Joined: 12.Feb.2014

Thanks xtenzion2, however, I am well over 30 and at this point in my life I really can't picture myself living with roommates...

I guess I'll just have to wait once I am there to see what happens!

I do find the idea of troubleshooting housing in Sweden quite amusing, as I've never heard of anything quite like that before!
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