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Carl Philip in the doghouse

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14:15 CEST+02:00
What a difference birth order can make. While Crown Princess Victoria pootled around Budapest last week with an entourage of staff, security police bodyguards and rumours of a TV documentary in the offing, her younger brother was getting a public telling off for not keeping his pet Rottweiler on a lead.

And if that wasn't enough to make Prince Carl Philip feel insecure, the press reported this week that Sweden's security police put his protection so low on their list of priorities that the royal family has had to hire private bodyguards for him.

According to Aftonbladet, the prince has until recently been able to enjoy Stockholm's bars and nightclubs without protection.

"He's lived a laid-back and pretty anonymous life," a source told the paper. "It's Victoria and Madeleine who attract all the attention."

But now King Carl Gustav and Queen Silvia have decided to tighten security around their son and a private security firm has supplied two armed bodyguards to keep an eye on his every move. On Friday night they escorted the young prince to Stockholm's Café Opera where they "steered unwelcome guests away from his table".

They may find themselves having to keep him out of trouble on Stockholm's streets, too. Tuesday's Aftonbladet noted that Carl Philip has been reported to Norrmalm police station for strolling through Stockholm's Old Town with an unleashed Rottweiler on Saturday.

"The regulations are perfectly clear," said Anders Krook at Norrmalm police. "You can't have dogs off a lead in central Stockholm."

The dog, whose name is Gila, was also spotted running free in a park in Gärdet - and that's not allowed either, as the palace has now been informed.

"The prince has made a mistake and can only apologise for it," said the palace press officer, Ann-Christine Jernberg.

Actually, he could find himself having to do more than apologise.

"The law is the same for everyone," said Anders Krook, as people always do when a member of the royal family misbehaves. "This could well result in a fine."

Aftonbladet said that the prince was reported to the police by "a private person", but didn't comment on the extraordinary coincidence that a press photographer happened to be present to snap the prince and his dog both in the Old Town and in Gärdet.

While Aftonbladet got the weekend's royal exclusive, TV4 may have netted a far bigger fish. According to Expressen, the channel's star presenter Linda Nyberg is hoping to produce a documentary about the day-to-day life of Carl Philip's big sister, Victoria.

"I have been in touch with the Crown Princess's mentor, Elisabeth Tarras-Wahlberg and asked if it was possible," said Nyberg, who joined the princess on her recent trip to Hungary.

"The princess was clearly very positive about letting me follow her," she added. "I hope that this programme will show sides which viewers have never seen before."

Victoria has already agreed to an interview for Linda Nyberg's TV show 'Helt ärligt' (Completely Honest) at the beginning of November.

"Then I hope that there will be a longer documentary later in the autumn," said Nyberg.

Sources: Expressen, Aftonbladet

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