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Expelled refugee's money "lost by police"

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23:31 CET+01:00
A mix-up of names has caused up to 30,000 crowns to disappear and end up in Iraq, according to DN on Monday.

When Kaleb Faraj had been arrested and held by the police awaiting his deportation back to Libya.

His friends in Sweden had raised 30,000 crowns, which they handed over the money to the police in Solna so that it could be forwarded and given to him. The police confirmed the money would get to him.

"Faraj was deported on 1st December 2004 and sent with a flight to Libya", confirmed DN.

A few days after his arrival in Libya he contacted his friends to say he had landed, but he had no money. His friends realised that the police had never forwarded their money.

"I was only given clothes", said Faraj.

Tomas Rönnberg at the police station in Västerort has confirmed that the police in Solna received the money and counted it. It has been said that he personally signed out the money upon his release.

At this time there was a man from Iraq held in the same detention centre. It is believed that "the two men's names were mistaken and the wrong man received the money", according to DN.

Following an unsuccessful investigation, the case has now been closed and Faraj's friends are very upset with the outcome.

"If the money went to the wrong person, then the clothes that Faraj received would have gone to the wrong person as well", said his friends.

The police argue that the mistake was due to the fact that the money and the clothes were handed over at separate occasions. According to rules no more than 500 SEK is allowed as a gift to someone who is under arrest.

A new investigation is underway in order for a decision to be made as to whether Faraj's friends will be compensated for the loss or not.

Source: Dagens Nyheter

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