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Swedish electricity is cheap

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18:15 CET+01:00
A study conducted by consultancy firm NUS Consulting Group reveals that Swedish electricity prices are amongst the lowest in the world.

The list is based on the average price that a company consuming 5.4 gigawatt hours a year would pay for one kilowatt hour. Sweden is the fourth cheapest at 37.31 kronor per kWh. Italy is the most expensive at 76.35 kronor per kWh.

Stock market expects battle over Cloetta

DI reports that Cloetta Fazer's share price soared last week when it became known that the Finnish majority shareholder Fazer had exceeded 50 per cent of votes and capital in the company and had put in a bid for the remaining shares at 240 kronor per share.

The share price rose above Fazer's bid yesterday and many are now speculating that a new bidder could step in and raise the stakes. Swiss company Nestlé has been named as a possible bidder.

Blue 1 beats Finnish state

SAS's Finnish subsidiary Blue 1 has won the dispute on the Finnish state's purchase of flights for 2003. The Supreme Administrative Court, HFD, ruled that the Finnish state should pay 2.7 million kronor in compensation to Blue 1 as SAS and Blue 1 did not think that state owned Finnair competed along the same criteria for the state's custom.

Sources: Dagens Nyheter, Svenska Dagbladet, Dagens Industri

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