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Twice as many speed cameras in Sweden next year

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12:01 CEST+02:00
The number of speed cameras on Sweden's roads is to double next year, as the Swedish Road Administration invests an extra 400 million kronor in catching drivers breaking the speed limit.

Today there are just 400 so-called 'metal policemen' on around 50 Swedish roads - and many of those are missing cameras. But by 2007, reported Göteborgs-Posten, these will be removed and replaced with 700 cameras on 150 roads.

"The development is in line with our work towards the zero vision," said Janeric Reiyer, deputy general director at the Swedish Road Administration, referring to the agency's goal of reducing the number of deaths on Swedish roads to as close to zero as possible.

New technology will dramatcially increase the efficiency of the cameras.

Instead of flesh-and-bone police officers clambering up their metal roadside cousins to remove the camera's images, the new cameras will be digital and controlled by an operations centre in Kiruna.

Images will be transmitted to Kiruna over a wireless network and staff will use them to investigate the owner and driver of the vehicle.

The Swedish Road Administration says there is plenty of evidence pointing to a general slowing of traffic and reduction in road deaths when automatic traffic controls are used. But the agency has not yet decided where the cameras will be placed.

"We will go through the accident and speeding statistics for the 90kph stretches which have a lot of traffic," said the agency's project manager, Kenneth Jonsson.

He added that the work would begin after the summer.

Sources: Göteborgs Posten

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