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HEALTH

Broccoli helps prevent pancreatic cancer – Swedish study

Beans and green vegetables such as broccoli and spinach which are high in folic acid help prevent pancreatic cancer but vitamin supplements do not help, a Swedish study published this week showed.

People who eat foods containing 350 micrograms of folic acid per day have a 75 percent lower risk of developing pancreatic cancer than those who ingest less than 200 micrograms, showed the study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

“Those who ate the most folic acid ran the lowest risk,” researcher Susanna Larsson, a nutritional epidemiologist at Sweden’s Karolinska Institute who led the study, told AFP.

To ingest 350 micrograms of folic acid, a person would need to eat about four portions of broccoli, she said, noting that an average Swede would normally eat around 200 micrograms per day.

Her team studied the food intakes of 82,000 Swedes from 1997 until 2004 to determine their intake of folic acid. Of the participants, 135 people developed pancreatic cancer during the seven-year study.

The research showed that those who ate vitamin supplements containing folic acid did not experience the same benefits as those who received folic acid from vegetables.

“There was no link with vitamins containing folic acid,” Larsson said, suggesting that folic acid may somehow be different in its vitamin form than in its natural form.

AFP

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LEARNING SWEDISH

Coughs, colds and flu: What to say and do if you fall sick in Sweden

It's the season when the horrible bugs strike and have us all spluttering into a tissue, so here's the vocab you need to deal with coughs, colds and flu in Sweden.

Coughs, colds and flu: What to say and do if you fall sick in Sweden

It’s not pleasant but as the temperatures fall many people will be falling victim to traditional winter illnesses, from a slight cold to a nasty dose of the flu. So if you are feeling poorly, here’s the Swedish words you need to get help.

En förkylning – a cold. You can also use the adjective if you want to say you feel like you have a cold: jag är förkyld. 

If you have a basic winter cold there are lots of treatments available without prescription in the pharmacy. They include näsdroppar (nose drops) or nässprej (nose spray) if you’ve got a blocked nose, and halstabletter (throat tablets) or halssprej (throat spray) if you’ve got a sore throat. 

Hosta – a cough. If you have one of these you may want some hostmedicin (cough medicine), which you can get from a pharmacy, although Sweden’s 1177 healthcare information website states that it’s just as effective to drink a lot of water. Unlike in English, you don’t use the article when saying you have a cough. Instead, you say jag har hosta (literally: I have cough).

Bear in mind that Swedish pharmacists do extensive medical training so are able to provide consultations and advice on a range of minor illnesses.

If you’re buying cough medicine you will probably be asked if your cough is torr (dry) slemmig (wet or productive cough) allvarlig (severe) or kronisk (long-lasting).

En feber – A fever. If your illness is a little more severe and you are running a temperature this is the word you want. Again, your pharmacist can give you over-the-counter medication for this, and will advise you to consult a doctor if they consider it more severe.

Panodil – this is the most common brand-name for Paracetamol in Sweden and can be bought without prescription from all pharmacies if you need a painkiller or something to help a fever. It’s so ubiquitous that people generally refer to simply ‘Panodil’ rather than paracetamol. 

Influensa – The flu. Flu season affects thousands of people every year in Sweden and if you’re in an at-risk group it’s a good idea to get your flu vaccine (full details of how to access it here).

Vårdcentral – literally, your “health centre”, this is where you go to to speak to a läkare (doctor), the Swedish equivalent to a family doctor or GP, one that covers all types of medicine and doesn’t specialise.

Symtomen – The symptoms. If you visit the doctor they will probably ask your symptoms and these might include svullna halsmandlar (swollen tonsils), hosta (coughing) or jag har svårt att andas (I have difficulty breathing/swallowing). If you want to say that something hurts, you say jag har ont i [insert body part here]”. 

Ett recept– A prescription. The doctor hands these out then you go to the pharmacy to collect the medicine.

One very important question you might be asked is har du något läkemedelsallergi? – Are you allergic to any medications?

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