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Senior policeman guilty of weapons offences

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13:47 CEST+02:00
A Stockholm police inspector has been found guilty by the Swedish Supreme Court of weapons offences and misconduct.

Olle Liljegren was given a suspended prison sentence, reversing the February 2005 decision of the Appeal Court, which freed him after he was initially sentenced to four years in prison.

Very little remains of the ten charges faced by Liljegren in the Appeal Court, when the state prosecutor accused him of serious weapons offences, explosives offences and misconduct.

The Supreme Court only found him guilty of two of those charges. One was a firearms offence relating to shooting practice on the island of Rindö in Vaxholm in November 2002. Liljegren had arranged a private session for a few people he hoped could be informers. A number of guns were used which had been taken from the police's weapons store.

Liljegren was found guilty of not having a licence for the use of the weapons on Rindö.

The second charge of which he was found guilty was misconduct. In 2003 Liljegren was given an automatic weapon by someone "who did not have the right to have it". He then passed on the weapon to an informer who was given the task of passing it on.

The court's view was that the crimes which Liljegren was guilty of did not constitute illegal possession of firearms.

In sentencing, the Supreme Court took into consideration that fact that Liljegren had been imprisoned for a long time and did not therefore add a further jail term to the suspended sentence.

Liljegren was initially sentenced to four years in prison in October 2004 for drugs and weapons offences. In March 2005 he was released by the Court of Appeal, a decision which the prosecutor decided to challenge in the Supreme Court.

TT/The Local

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