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Suspected child killer 'posed no threat'

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10:04 CET+01:00
The National Board of Health and Welfare is to investigate the release of the 27-year-old man suspected of stabbing eight-year-old Tobias Enroth to death in the small southern town of Norrahammar on Thursday.

The man was released in November after two and a half years of psychiatric care.

In 2004 the man was sentenced to psychiatric care after setting fire to his mother's home. He was treated during this time at the psychiatric ward at Jönköping County Hospital.

Regional health board supervisor Ulla Frysmark has now pledged to look into the conditions surrounding the man's release.

"It sounds serious, according to the information I have received. As a result we will endeavour to find out more. I also plan contacting the head doctor during the day," she told Sveriges Radio.

A team of medical experts decided in November that the man, who suffers from schizophrenia, did not pose any danger to society as long as he took his medicine.

"At the moment he does not pose any threat whatsoever. His compulsory institutional care must come to an end," wrote chief medical doctor Freddy Johansen.

And the doctor still maintains that the decision he made at the time was correct.

"He wasn't dangerous then. Today I would of course have reached a different verdict," he told Expressen.

On Sunday the man's mother noticed that he was carrying a knife when she drove him home.

Members of his family say that they contacted the psychiatric ward to warn them that something was amiss.

"They said they would go out and take a look at him. But now we have understood that they didn't do what they said they would," the man's brother told Aftonbladet.

According to the family, staff from the hospital tried to phone the 27-year-old. When they did not receive an answer they left a note in his letterbox.

"The responsibility rests with the psychiatric care system. If they can't do a better job of following up on patients and making sure they take their medication then there is a serious problem," he added.

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