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Swedish tourists grounded after emergency landing

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23:49 CET+01:00
A charter plane from Thailand with 356 Scandinavian tourists onboard was forced to make an emergency landing in the United Arab Emirates on Saturday after a fault was discovered in an engine.

Just one week ago, the same plane was affected by a fault in the rudder system.

On this occasion, the pilot successfully landed the Novair plane in Sharja with with only one of the two engines working.

"The captain felt vibrations and for safety reasons he shut down the motor so that it wouldn't shake itself apart," said Anders Fred, the managing director of Novair.

The fault with the motor was discovered after the plane had refuelled during a scheduled stop in Dubai. The journey between Dubai and Sharja, where the motor was shut down, took around 30 minutes.

54 of the plane's passengers were heading for Arlanda. The rest were on their way to Copenhagen.

"The passengers will be delayed by around 12 hours. We have put them up at a hotell in Sharja until another plane can come and pick them up," said Fred.

Last Saturday, the same plane was affected by a technical fault during the stop in Dubai. Then, around 350 passengers were forced to wait almost two days in a hotel while a new computer was installed.

"But that was a completely different fault. Then it was a rudder problem," explained Anders Fred, who said he did not consider the Airbus A330 to be a particularly problematic type of plane.

The 356 passengers, who were expected home on Sunday afternoon, had booked their trips through the charter companies My Travel, Fritidsresor and Apollo.

Novair, which has five Airbus planes in its fleet, is owned by the Swiss company Kuoni Scandinavia.

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