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Police kept busy by 'crying girl' art installation

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09:38 CET+01:00
An art installation at Nolhagaviken nature reserve on Sweden's west coast has created plenty of extra work for local police. Many concerned members of the public have reported hearing a girl crying in the control tower.

"This art work has kept me nice and busy for a couple of days. People are reporting everything from somebody having jumped to children being raped and women crying.

"They have experienced this quite differently depending on the time of day and level of drunkenness," said Morten Gunneng, police commander in Alingsås.

The tower is located on a hill in the nature reserve on the outskirts of Alingsås and is a popular spot for joggers and people out for a nice walk in the countryside.

Police have received a steady stream of varying reports since the installation began on Saturday.

On six occasions police officers have driven out to the suspected crime scene. A further five potential excursions have been vetoed by Morten Gunneng.

Police were informed about the installation in advance, but clearly the general public had not been quite so well advised.

Morten Gunneng could not say exactly how many emergency phone calls police had received in relation to the installation, but he gives the impression of a relentless flow. Several people have also called in solely to complain about the artwork.

"I have directed all of the angry citizens to local newspaper Alingsås Tidning. If they write a big article about it then maybe somebody from the local council who authorized this will get cold feet.

"So I hope it will disappear sometime this week," said Gunneng.

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