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Reinfeldt expresses concerns over party morals

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Reinfeldt expresses concerns over party morals
Photo: Moderaterna (Archive)
13:43 CET+01:00
Fredrik Reinfeldt has voiced concerns about the seeming unwillingness of some of his party colleagues to pay taxes.

Speaking during a trip to Helsinki to visit his Finnish counterpart, the Prime Minister spoke out about recent revelations that several Moderate Party members had paid cleaners and labourers cash-in-hand to avoid paying tax.

"There are far too many Moderates who have made mistakes," he said.

"I can understand that we're being asked this question. I have also made it clear that people have to be open about where things have been done wrong."

Reinfeldt said he was keen to initiate a discussion about the role of elected representatives.

"I hope too that people see that we are taking this seriously," he said.

At the weekend two prominent Moderate Party members - Carl and Charlotte Cederschiöld - admitted paying their cleaner cash-in-hand for the past 13 years.

The admission compounded the woes of the party, which has faced criticism after the woman brought in temporarily in the powerful role of Fredrik Reinfeldt's state secretary admitted she paid under the table for work done to her house. This followed the resignation of her predecessor over an evening of drinking with a journalist.

The beginning of Reinfeldt's tenure as prime minister was similarly marred by a spate of scandals that led to the resignations of two cabinet members.

Maria Borelius resigned as trade minister after only eight days in the job. She was forced to quit after questions were raised over her tax affairs. Culture Minister Cecilia Stegö Chilò resigned two days later after admitting she had not paid her television licence fee for sixteen years.

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