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Arboga murder weapon: witnesses testify

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15:03 CEST+02:00
The trial of the German murder suspect accused of killing two toddlers in Arboga, central Sweden continued on Wednesday, with witnesses testifying about a hammer that is the suspected murder weapon.

The woman returned to Germany the day after the murders. One male friend from Germany testified that suspect Christine Schürrer told him she was forced to leave a hammer at Skavsta airport.

The man testified that he met her when she returned home from Sweden on March 18th. He had the impression that she was well and happy about her new job as a tourist guide in Stockholm.

He testified to say that she claimed not to have known how the hammer got into her handbag and that it probably belonged to her landlady, but he could not remember exactly.

So far, the 32-year-old suspect has only mentioned the hammer in connection with doing repairs at the flat where she rented a room.

The witness also testified that he did not think she could have been pregnant last year, though she did wear a lot of baggy t-shirts. On the contrary, he had the impression that she had lost weight, he said.

Several other witnesses testified on Tuesday to say that Schürrer could not have been pregnant, as she claims. She also claims to have given the baby away.

The male friend who testified on Wednesday supported the suspect after her suicide attempt. She told him that she was depressed because of the break-up with her Swedish boyfriend, Torgny Hellberg, who is the live-in partner of the murdered toddlers' mother.

Another witness, the German woman's best friend in Sweden, said the same.

Schürrer told her that she moved to Sweden for her Swedish boyfriend, and that she was deeply disappointed when it didn't work out as she had hoped for. According to the woman, this was what Schürrer said after her suicide attempt last autumn.

Schürrer's friend had the impression that the suspect fell into a very deep depression at the beginning of the year. The witness was not sure if that was because Schürrer might have stopped taking the anti-depressants she was given after her suicide attempt.

Two more trial days remain, with the concluding arguments due to be presented on August 25th.

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