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Police step up hunt for missing baby corpse

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Police step up hunt for missing baby corpse
10:26 CEST+02:00
Police confirm that they have received a wealth of tips and information about the dead baby that went missing from a Stockholm church mortuary prior to burial this week.

"Many of the tips are interesting, which means that we have something to go on," said detective superintendent Magnus Sallrot to news agency TT.

Police have launched an investigation and have confirmed that they will conduct a series of interviews in the coming days.

All those with access to the mortuary have been identified and the police have searched refuse bins in the vicinity, sequestering a container.

"Even if what has occurred is not in itself a serious criminal offence it is serious on an emotional level and we are therefore dedicating significant resources to it," Sallrot said.

The missing body was discovered on Monday when the parents asked to see their deceased child, Ville, before laying him to rest.

Ville was born premature and lived for only a couple of hours at Karolinska University Hospital in Solna before being moved by the undertakers to Bromma church in the western suburbs of Stockholm on April 7th.

"We have interviewed the undertakers, and there is no doubt that the baby's body lay in the coffin and that it was placed in the mortuary," inspector Pontus Oscarsson at Stockholm police confirmed this week.

Four witnesses have confirmed that the body was in the coffin on arrival at the mortuary, three from the undertakers and one from Karolinska Hospital. Magnus Sallrot was on Friday unwilling to confirm how the coffin was sealed.

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