Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland
Advertisement

Blogger Profile: Eating Out With Alannah Eames

Share this article

Blogger Profile: Eating Out With Alannah Eames
12:00 CEST+02:00
If you're hungry, reading Alannah Eames' blog might not be a wise idea. The journalist and hobby food critic's thoughts on wining and dining in Stockholm (and beyond) will have your stomach grumbling and mouth watering within moments.

“My blog is an overview of places to eat, not to eat, new types of food, new chefs, and international experiences,” says Eames. “I also like to talk about things that are a little different. You might be bored of the same old restaurants, or on a budget, and I'll help you get value for money.”

Originally from Ireland, Eames came to Sweden five years ago for work, and stayed. Prior to settling here, she travelled for 10 years and sample the food on offer in countries all over the world.

“When I lived in Trinidad and Tobago I ate seafood, in Kenya I had wild meats like giraffe, in Kazakhstan I had Russian stew with rabbit and fresh trout from the mountains,” Eames recalls. “I'm not the kind of person who eats pasta and pizza all the time. I like to try things that are different.”

Tourists and those who are new to town might find themselves in a state of culinary confusion, but Eames can help. She says that since her boyfriend frequently travels and she hates eating alone, she eats most of her meals at restaurants with friends.

“If people don't have a clue where to go to eat, they end up in Gamla Stan and Stureplan, which is overpriced and not always the tastiest,” explains Eames. “If you go off the beaten track you discover loads of places, but if you don't know where to go it can be hard to find good spots.”

Eames says that with Stockholm's “millions of cafes,” it's hard to find the best service, quality, ambience and service – but fear not, she's here to help. And she's also open to suggestions from readers of what's hot, what's not, and where they are inspired.

“People label Swedish food as being bland,” she says, “But there's a lot more out there than just meatballs.”

Read Alannah's blog

Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Jobs
Click here to start your job search
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement