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Another Swede held in Pakistan: report

TT/The Local · 12 Oct 2009, 12:02

Published: 12 Oct 2009 12:02 GMT+02:00

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According to foreign ministry spokesperson Barbro Elm, the detainee is a 35-year-old man from central Sweden who was arrested in early August for entering the country illegally.

Since then he has been convicted and is currently waiting to be deported back to Sweden.

The foreign ministry had no information about the 35-year-old's supposed illegal entry into Pakistan from Afghanistan.

Citing “sources in Pakistan”, Sweden’s TV4 reported earlier on Monday that several people were arrested in Waziristan in northwestern Pakistan, including a Swedish citizen and two others with ties to Sweden. The people were arrested in the district of Dera Ghazi Khan on their way to southern Waziristan, where Al-Qaeda reportedly operates a training camp.

Swedish security service Säpo refused to comment on the matter.

“A Swede imprisoned abroad is a consular matter for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs,” said Säpo spokesperson Patrik Peter.

According to Dagens Nyheter (DN), a correspondent for Pakistani television network GEO News, Naveed Siddiqui, revealed in late August that the Pakistani police had shifted their focus from the three Swedes who were arrested at the end of August to another 28-year-old Swede who came to Waziristan from Afghanistan without a visa.

The three Swedes originally targeted in the probe returned to Sweden at the weekend, along with the two-year-old son of one of the suspects.

The 35-year-old Swede was reportedly arrested in Loralai in the state of Beluchistan in western Pakistan and then taken to the provincial capital of Quetta, where he now sits awaiting transport to Islamabad for eventual deportation to Sweden.

During his time in prison, the man has not had any visits from Swedish diplomatic or consular personnel.

“The French honorary consul in the area has visited him,” Elm told the TT news agency.

In addition to time in prison, which the man had served by the time the court ruling was announced, the 35-year-old’s sentence also included fines and a deportation order.

Magnus Ranstorp, a terrorism expert at the Swedish National Defence Colleage (Försvarshögskolan) pointed out that the German interior ministry estimates that between 50 and 100 Islamists who reside in Germany have traveled to the lawless regions around the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Western intelligence organizations believe that many of them traveled there without having any set plans for what they were going to do. In German, British, and Danish terror investigations, there are also examples of operations being planned and controlled from abroad by people with contacts in the area.

Story continues below…

“Maybe they are being trained down there, but they can also be successively manipulated and sent back,” Ranstorp told TT.

“But so far we haven’t seen a Swedish case of this,” he added.

Nor has Ranstorp seen or heard any estimates of how many Swedes there are in the area.

TT/The Local (news@thelocal.se)

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Your comments about this article

12:49 October 12, 2009 by this_aint_sparta
This is weird. I feel things in this world are not that simple as they look.
12:57 October 12, 2009 by antoniolgj
Sorry, I can't help but laugh when I read that another "Swede" has been arrested. As if these people are really Swedish.

A piece of paper given by a weak government doesn't make you a Swedish...
13:22 October 12, 2009 by Noni
That story is coming again and again now..
14:27 October 12, 2009 by sherkovic
@antiologi; I have even more reasons to laugh and just cant stop. Because if an immigrant like Zlatan do any good then the swedes immediately forget about his origin and praise him as a swede and not as person of an immigrant origin.

However if a person is caught with suspicions (remember suspiciouns are not evidences and every evidence is not definitely acceptable in the court of law) then the swedes immediately dump him out of sweden and start calling him 'a swede of foreign origin'.

Are you sure you are not paranoid?
14:57 October 12, 2009 by Rick Methven
Mehdi Ghezali and Safia Benaouda are Swedes. They where born in Sweden and their parents hold Swedish passports. This is their country. It is not possible to strip them of their Swedish nationality. They have more right to be in this country than the immigrants who spout their poison on these pages.

In fact as people like antoniologj, DreEstwd, Pauli P are guilty of breaking the "hets mot folkgrupp" law which makes it illegal to publicly make statements that threaten or express disrespect for an ethnic group or similar group regarding their race, skin colour, national or ethnic origin, faith or sexual orientation. Then I think we should start a movement to have them deported from Sweden
16:07 October 12, 2009 by KamiZ
good idea. i'm all for it. these people are neo-Nazis
17:16 October 12, 2009 by Mr_Raja
The only reason, people think that he is not swede. and only one paper make him/her swede. Is only because of their Muslim name. They think that a Muslim can never be a swede.. But If they born in sweden they are Swedish..

And a country is not the property of any race..

And in Fact UK and USA also do like same.. If "IMRAN KHAN " win the Olympia they never said "He was PAkistani" .. But if some one, who even born in UK, USA and do some bad. They dnt mind to realise Pakistan that his Granparents was Pakistanies..
17:57 October 12, 2009 by DreEstwd
Rick Meth and Kami Z- If I am a neo-Nazi then you people are Sharia Law advocates.

I am begging you people to at least put up an argument insupport of your position, for once, rather than just name-calling. Myself and people who share my views have put up PLENTY of factual information and statistics from reputable, non-partisan sources. You two and Nevon have done nothing of the sort. No facts, no statistics, no info...just name-calling. If this was a high-school debate class, you all would receive failing grades. Either defend your position or consider yourselves the losers of this debate. Class dismissed.
18:51 October 12, 2009 by here for the summer
For once I agree with some aspects of @sherkovic;s argument. Citizens are citizens and have the same rights. Still the Swedish government should be bailing out people caught in terrorist controled areas. Citizens traveling to areas near terrorist training camps should nbot be assisted by the state and from past experience "9/11, London and Spain" are people to be watched if they would be released and returned.
20:35 October 12, 2009 by mkvgtired
antoniolgj, it would be funny if these "victims of American aggression" were not coming back with the ability to make bombs or harm the public in some other way. It seems Packistan is collecting Swedish citizens these days...oddly enough all are caught in areas where terrorists are trained.
21:41 October 12, 2009 by totyis
Another Swede held in Pakistan. So? Sweden sleeps. There is nothing more respect worthy and desired than a 200 years of non-combat . In a peaceful world. But as long as extremist are rising and menacing the existence of Europeans at least be careful and defend yourselves. Good luck!
09:34 October 13, 2009 by petermoul
@sherkovic: LMAO ... dude people are not paranoid they got hypocrite when it comes to their defense

There are rotten eggs every where ... Highest rapist in Europe belongs here as you all know and trust me not all of them are immigrants :) so yes don't judge the whole nation or community / system with the acts of a small group of people.. Its not like all real SWEDES has anti sins system install in them.

So be realistic people don't judge the person on gender,color, religion and country. Humanity is something bigger than this. Earn respect by giving it to others
13:18 October 13, 2009 by Beynch
The term `Swedish citizen` appears to have taken on a whole new meaning these days. I'd pay money find out his name. Is it perhaps Nils Petterson from Borlänge?
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