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Winter chill means scorching electrical bill

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09:10 CET+01:00
Swedish homeowners with electrical heating can expect a whopping bill for January for up to around 2,000 kronor ($280) higher than if the weather had been “normal”.

The bad news was offered by the giant utility Vattenfall Norden which also noted that price levels were already higher than, say, in November last year. The utility said this is due to limited available supplies of electricity running up against increased demand.

In all this, the caveat is the sort of agreement you struck with your utility company in the first place. Worst affected are those who signed up for variable rates. But the cheapest alternative at the moment is a fixed rate for electricity.

Average prices at a fixed rate are running at 108 öre per kilowatt hour for homeowners, while those stuck with variable rates can reckon on 132 öre per kilowatt hour, according to Sigge Ericsson, Private Marketing Manager at Vattenfall Norden.

On the other hand (and just to make matters more complicated): prices at variable rates were lower last year than for fixed rates.

Evidently, it mainly comes down to the weather.

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