SHARE
COPY LINK

OFFBEAT

Hundreds of rabbits hit as roof caves in

A roof collapsed on Sweden's largest rabbit show in the early hours of Saturday morning leaving more than a thousand furry animals trapped inside the building.

Hundreds of rabbits hit as roof caves in

Described by the UK’s Fur and Feather magazine as “the biggest show in Sweden”, the Nyköping exhibition, 100 kilometres south of Stockholm, had attracted 1,648 rabbits and their owners to the local tennis hall.

“It was very, very fortunate that the collapse happened at night. If there had been people in the building they would probably not all have survived,” rescue coordinator Lars Ahlgren told local newspaper Södermanlands Nyheter.

The roof and one of the gable walls of Rosvalla tennis hall gave way at 1.30am on Saturday. Police have not yet fully established the cause of the collapse, though heavy snowfall is being considered a fairly safe bet.

The tennis hall was locked at the time of the collapse. Fortunately, a dance event organized by the local rabbit owners’ association was taking place in a separate building.

Police said many rabbit owners remained outside the tennis tall at 6 o’clock in the morning.

“There are a lot of sad rabbit owners at the scene. We’ve been focussing on making sure that none of them try to get in to the rabbits. There is a risk of further collapses,” police inspector Urban Nordqvist told Södermanlands Nyheter.

Lars Ahlgren said around half of the rabbit cages were located under the section of roof that had collapsed.

“The rest of the cages are at the other side and we’re going to try to lift those out mechanically,” he told news agency TT.

“We’re not going to attempt to rescue the rabbits under the collapse, since that would mean sacrificing attempts to save the rabbits that we know are still alive.”

Exhibition organizer Johnny Johansson (pictured) was in place to welcome the first rabbit that managed to make its way out of the wreckage. But it is not yet known how many rabbits died when the roof caved in.

“There are pockets where the rabbits are hiding,” rescue worker Ulf Jämtäng told TT.

“Some of them are finding open slots and getting out; we’re catching rabbits all the time.”

All escaped rabbits are being placed in hutches outside the exhibition area.

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

OFFBEAT

Swedish police remove sculpture mistaken for suicide victim

Police on the island of Gotland removed a public sculpture from the Galgberget nature reserve near Visby on the grounds that it is just too creepy.

Swedish police remove sculpture mistaken for suicide victim
The gallows at Galgeberget. Photo: Artifex/WikiCommons
According to local news site Hela Gotland, someone was out for a stroll on Galgeberget (the Gallows Hill) on Wednesday when they saw what they thought was a body hanging after a suicide. Local police were contacted but when they went to investigate they instead found a sculpture by artist Jessica Lundeberg. 
 
The artwork, entitled ‘The Watcher in the Woods’, is a partially transparent plate sculpture that looks like a spooky little girl. 
 
 
Despite discovering that the suspected suicide victim was actually artwork, police determined that Lundeberg’s piece could scare others and thus took the sculpture down. 
 
“It was decided that if it were to remain, more people would likely be frightened in the same way,” Gotland police spokesman Ayman Aboulaich told Radio P4 Gotland. 
 
Lundeberg told Hela Gotland that the sculpture has been at Galgeberget since a public art project last summer and that this was the first time it had caused any concern. She said ‘The Watcher in the Woods’ was the only piece that was allowed to remain after the end of the project. But now it is there no more. 
 
 
Lundeberg has taken the sculpture back to her studio. While she hopes it will eventually return to Galgeberget, the artist told Hela Gotland it seems unlikely.  
 
She said that the sculpture was damaged by police. 
 
“It was ragged, dismantled and broken. I was horrified when I saw it,” she said. 
 
Police have reportedly promised to pay any necessary repair costs.
 
Although the person who reported the sculpture to the police has not spoken with the media, their jump to conclusions could perhaps be attributed to the nature reserve’s macabre history. Galgeberget is still home to gallows that were used to hang criminals for centuries. The last execution to be held at the site was in 1845, according to Hela Gotland
 
 
SHOW COMMENTS