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Westling learns how to become Prince Daniel

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Westling learns how to become Prince Daniel
10:19 CET+01:00
The Swedish Court has announced that Daniel Westling, fiancé of Swedish Crown Princess Victoria, is participating in a program to enhance his understanding about “the ceremonies and culture inheritance that is linked to the history of the monarchy.”

The course, which has just started, runs for “more than 18 months” in the first instance, the Court said. It includes studies in political science, history, and Swedish culture. The 36-year-old Westling will also make study visits to various organizations.

Westling, equity partner in three fitness gyms, met Victoria in 2002 while he was her personal trainer.

Meantime, wedding gifts for the couple are being announced every week. A set of luxury bed sheets valued at 26,000 kronor ($3,700) are now being woven at the celebrated Klässbols Linen Mill as a gift from Värmland Province, reports the news agency TT. The sheets will not exactly be a surprise. Permission was required from the Court to stitch the royal monogram into the pricey linens.

A well-known tourist attraction, Klässbols is a family-owned company producing luxury cloths, including linen and napkins for the annual Nobel Prize dinners, along with special items for Swedish royals.

The marriage in June will take place at a resplendent ceremony in Stockholm Cathedral. After tying the knot, Westling will be known as Prince Daniel, and also the Duke of Västergötland. A prince or princess is expected to maintain a special public connection to his or her duchies, but do not govern them.

Following his engagement last year, Westling underwent a successful kidney transplant operation, with his father as donor.

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