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TRAVEL

Sweden’s Top 5 adventure vacations

Looking for a thrill? The Local's Emily Gelb offers up a several options showcasing Sweden’s great outdoors.

Sweden's Top 5 adventure vacations

These trips have all been approved by Nature’s Best, Sweden’s leading ecotourism guide to high quality, responsible outdoor adventures.

Check them out, and get moving!

Dog sledding in Västerbotten

Explore Sweden’s remote and frozen landscapes with the company of man’s best friend. Dog sledding is an ancient and exciting way to travel across the Arctic. This outfitter offers a magical four-day trip during the full moon, a rare trip for those looking for a memorable winter adventure.

For more information about dates and prices, check the website: Aurora Borealis Adventures

Timber rafting in Värmland

Bring along a few friends and step back into time. On this trip, you learn how to build your very own log raft and float it down a river. A true test of outdoor survival skills, this trip is a fun family trip for adventurers of all ages.

To learn more about the trip, visit the tour operator’s website here: Vildmark i Värmland

Sami reindeer sled safari in Lappland

Leave life in the city behind and step into the wild north of Lappland. On this trip, you will learn about Sami culture and lifestyle by going on a reindeer drive across the snowy wilderness. Experience sleeping in Sami tents, catch a glimpse of the northern lights, and soak in the history of generations of traditional Sami reindeer herders.

For more information, visit: Nutti Sámi Siida

Explore the border on horseback in Jämtland

Discover the birch forests and grassy meadows of northern Jämtland. This trip explores the magical mountains that bridge the border of Norway and Sweden, all upon the back of a bright and patient Icelandic pony. These tiny horses are known for their sweet disposition and curious gait, which will excite riders of all levels.

To learn more about the trip and outfitter, check out: Korpens Öga

Mountain bike Gotland

The remote roads and dirt tracks of Gotland are perfect for challenging, adventure mountain biking. See this relaxing summer island through a whole new set of eyes on a mountain biking trek led by Gotland local and world class adventurer Berra Marcusson. While the trip is based around biking, it is also possible to add caving, visits to rum distilleries, kayaking, ghost walks, and rabbit jumping.

For more information on how to build your own trip, visit: MCraft.se

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SAMI

Swedish museum to return Sami remains to village

Uppsala's university museum is to return a Sami skeleton to ethnic Sami living in Arctic Lapland, following a campaign by the Sami parliament, Amnesty, and the Bishop of Luleå.

Swedish museum to return Sami remains to village

The skeleton came from a Sami from the village of Arjeplog in Sweden’s northernmost Norrbotten county, who was serving a life sentence at Stockholm’s Långholmen prison when he died. The skeleton had been on display at Gustavianum, Uppsala University’s Museum. 

“The government has today decided that Uppsala University should be able to return human remains, in the form of a mounted skeleton, to the Arjeplog Sami association,” the government said in a press release.

“The university’s request has been prompted by a request from the Arjeplog Sami association requesting the repatriation of the remains. Uppsala University has determined that Arjeplog’s Sami association has a legitimate claim on the remains and that the association will be able to ensure a dignified reception.” 

Sweden’s universities and museums have been gradually returning the Sami remains and artefacts collected in the 19th and early 20th century when research institutes such as Uppsala’s State Institute for Race Biology, sought to place Sami below ethnic Swedes through studying eugenics and human genetics. 

Lund University returned Sami remains earlier this year, and in 2019, the remains of more than 25 individuals were returned by Västerbotten Museum to Gammplatsen, an old Sami meeting place on the Umeå River in southern Lapland. 

Mikael Ahlund, chief of the Uppsala University Museum, said that the skeleton was one of “about 20 to 25” that the museum had been given responsibility for in about 2010, when the university’s medical faculty was clearing out its old collections, and had never been put on display. 

He said it was “a bit unclear how these remains were collected and how they were used”. 

“It’s a complex history at the end of the 19th century, with teaching anatomy. They also had a connection to the ideology of the period, the idea of races and the different anatomy of races, so that’s the dark shadow of that period.” 

In a press release last November, Margaretha Andersson, the head of Uppsala’s Museums, said that in 1892, when the man died, there was nothing strange about prisons donating the bodies of dead prisoners to university medical departments.

“In the old days, it was not unusual that the bodies from people who died in prison were passed to the university’s medical and research departments,” she said. 

Ahlund said that the museum had always been willing to return the skeleton to the Sami association, but that there had been bureaucratic hurdles to doing so. 

“What you need to know is that we are Swedish government institution, so we can’t just repatriate them as we would like ourselves, it needs to be a decision from the government, which is what happened today.” 

He said that the skeleton would be delivered to Arjeplog “as soon as possible”. “We expect it to happen early autumn, or something like that.”

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