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HELICOPTER

Three helicopter heist suspects released

Three of the men charged for their role in the helicopter-aided robbery of a Stockholm-area cash depot last September were released today by Södertörn district court.

Three helicopter heist suspects released

Two of the men are charged for blocking roads near the G4S cash depot in Västberga, south of Stockholm.

The third suspect is charged with having planted fake bombs near a police heliport in Myttinge on the island of Värmdö.

Prosecutors had asked that the men each be sentenced to ten years in prison, but the men’s release is an indication that they may be acquitted of the charges.

Defence attorney Lars Engstrand defended one of the men who is suspected of having place chains on the streets around the depot.

During deliberations on Thursday, the court concluded that the reasons keeping the men remanded in custody were no longer existed, Engstrand’s client was released.

“I’d interpret this as meaning that the suspicions have diminished to such an extent that there is a lot of indicate he’s going to be acquitted,” Engstrand told the TT news agency.

His client is charged with aggravated robbery and prosecutors had urged the court to sentence the man to ten years behind bars.

“He’s quite relieved, I just spoke with him,” said Engstrand.

Attorney Björn Lagerling is defending a 24-year-old man who is accused of sabotaging the police response by planting fake bombs near the police’s helicopter hangar.

Lagerling is satisfied with the decision and believes there is much to indicate that his client will be acquitted.

The 24-year-old is charged with aggravated robbery which carries a minimum prison sentence of four years.

If a crime has a minimum sentence of at least two years, a suspected can be remanded to custody if the court believes the evidence is strong.

The fact that the man was released indicates that the suspicions are considered weak.

According to his attorney, the man had not yet heard the news of his release as of late Thursday afternoon.

“The family is really happy; we’re naturally pleased with the news,” said Lagerling.

Attorney Göran Helmer is defending the 31-year-ikd man accused of having to block off a number of roads near the cash depot during the robbery.

Chains laced with crow’s feet were laid out across the street.

Helmer thinks the court was right to release his client and believes the release means his client won’t be convicted.

“I spoke with him as soon as I got the news. He and his family are overjoyed and he’s home with his wife right now,” said Helmer.

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IKEA

Ikea to test cash-free store in Sweden

Swedish furniture giant Ikea is going to use its Gävle location to test out whether it can go completely cash-free nationwide.

Ikea to test cash-free store in Sweden
Ikea will go cash-free throughout Sweden if the test is a success. Photo: TT
Ikea said that customers in Gävle, an eastern city best known for its giant straw Christmas goat, were strongly in favour of abandoning cash. 
 
“In our surveys, the vast majority of customers have said that cash payments are no longer important. Today we use a fair amount of resources on handling cash but we’d prefer to use them on something else,” Patric Burstein, the head of customer relations at the Gävle store, told Dagens Nyheter. 
 
Ikea said that its cashless test would begin in Gävle on October 1st. If all goes well, the company plans to eliminate cash payments in all of its Swedish locations. 
 
Department store Åhléns is also testing the idea of going cashless, with three of its locations currently not accepting cash payments. 
 
Swedes use their debit cards three times as frequently as most Europeans and with the popularity of smartphone payment apps like Swish, it has been predicted that Sweden will be completely cash-free by 2030.  
 
The move to ditch cash also has its naysayers, however, with some Swedes worried about the effects on rural areas, pensioners – and personal integrity.
 
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