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Swedish fatwa council condemns bomb attack

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Swedish fatwa council condemns bomb attack
11:09 CET+01:00
The Swedish Fatwa Council (Svenska Fatwarådet) condemned on Sunday the recent suicide bombing in central Stockholm, while the Swedish Security Service (Säpo) has confirmed that it believes the attacker was acting alone.

A number of imams issued a fatwa, calling the attack in central Stockholm on December 11th "deplorable" and "reprehensible."

Moderate Muslims reject all forms of extremism and fundamentalist interpretations of Islamic teachings, laws and practices. Destruction, the spread of fear, terror and killings have nothing to do with Islam, the imams wrote on Sunday in the fatwa.

"Muslim institutions around the world have already written about this for a long time. In Sweden, we don't accept terrorism and refuse violence," Mahmoud Khalfi, the spokesman for religious affairs of the Islamic Association in Sweden (Islamiska Förbundet i Sverige), told The Local on Monday.

Separately, the Swedish Security Service (Säkerhetspolisen, Säpo) announced on Sunday that there are still no indications that the suicide bomber, widely believed to be Tranäs native Taimour Abdulwahab, worked with any accomplices in the attack.

On Sunday, Säpo announced that it had no new information with which to proceed with the investigation of the suicide attack.

"So far, there is nothing to suggest he had an accomplice, but we are working with an open mind," Säpo press secretary Sara Kvarnström said on Sunday.

In addition, it is also unclear when the analyses and investigations of the crime scenes and the findings will be completed.

The stream of tips from the public has also waned, while the wave of false rumours and warnings of new bombings that have flourished on Facebook and spread by SMS appears to have declined.

"It is not a big problem," said Säpo spokeswoman Ulrika Hjerpe.

The police will continue to enhance its presence on the streets and in public areas throughout the country.

"We want to be seen. Not because there is an increased risk, but because there are many who are worried," said Hjerpe.

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