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More cheaters booted from Swedish colleges

TT/The Local/dl · 17 Jan 2011, 12:08

Published: 17 Jan 2011 12:08 GMT+01:00

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A total of 506 students were forced to leave Sweden's 26 largest institutions of higher learning last year, according to a review of statistics by the TT news agency.

Linköping University in central Sweden had the highest number of expulsions, while the University of Gävle in eastern Sweden experienced the largest increase in expelled cheaters between 2009 and 2010.

In addition, Jönköping University in central Sweden expelled 16 students in 2010, double the figure from the previous year, TV4 reported earlier this month. The most frequent types of cheating reported were plagiarism of essays or final exams.

The findings prompted education minister Jan Björklund to suggest that Swedish college and universities need to tighten up their approach to cheating and review the penalties handed out to cheating students.

"I take cheating very seriously and won't rule out the need to be tougher both in discoveries and punishments," he told the TT news agency.

However, Björklund added that he wants to get a more complete picture of academic dishonesty at Sweden's institutions of higher learning.

"This is serious enough that I'm going to ask university chancellors to review instances of cheating, how they deal with cheating today, and whether or not there is a need to be tougher and if there is reason for greater uniformity," he said.

Björklund said he expected the request to be formalized later this spring.

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He theorised that the increase in expulsions from cheating may be attributable to the introduction of more effective methods of uncovering academic fraud, including various digital search tools designed to unmask plagiarism.

TT's statistics are drawn from information from colleges and universities that licenced to award bachelor and doctoral degrees.

TT/The Local/dl (news@thelocal.se)

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Your comments about this article

13:49 January 17, 2011 by dammen
I I am not at all surprised by this - but they had also better look at the lecturers themselves. An old tutor of mine at one of the Swedish Universities told me it was OK for students to copy large amounts out of an out-of-date text book that was the course literature but not ok for lecturers. Having worked in publishing for a while I know that was clear infringement of copyright laws.

Who is the one ultimately cheating?
14:09 January 17, 2011 by tim66stones
I think it will keep on increasing as there is more and more pressure on them to do well. If they could all get jobs in the future there wouldn't be a need for them do as well and no need to cheat.
15:31 January 17, 2011 by teslar

while I agree with your conclusion in your example, copyright infringement and plagiarism are not the same. You can be guilty of one but not the other and vice versa.


funny, I keep hearing that argument. I'd have thought that if there is a pressure to do well, the reasonable thing to do is study a lot and the last thing that should come to your mind would be to cheat. Universities are good at catching cheaters (not perfect of course) and they are getting better.

Also, students are told at the beginning of their studies what plagiarism is and even that there are automated ways of detecting them pretty accurately. It's very much a "don't even think about it" message. So under what logic does "i should cheat" follow from "I really really need good grades" if it is known beforehand that 1) it's wrong and 2) there is a high (and climbing) risk in getting caught?
15:38 January 17, 2011 by OnessOfMankind
Cheating has many ways, one is memorising without understanding is cheating too, many students at the psychology school mugged up information and understood nothing and then passed with high marks...

Later on became useless..

Examination on paper is worthless, it should be done with conversation, and to see how much a person understood. Instead of papers.

Because now a days there are ways to remember loads of information, and forget them later without understanding them...That is cheating too...So many mugg ups passed the MDA but made idiot docs, and many that didnt get very high grades went to russia and completed there medicine and became the best doctors...infact the greated people on earth was not the best in academics.
20:55 January 17, 2011 by andrewsrocks
I hope this new approach improve the conditions in which each student shows how much they've learn. I'm my school I find it very difficult to focus during examination because of the constant and indistinguishable muttering that goes on each time. Also, some "clever" students become "friends" of the examiner and try by every mean( I mean EVERY) to get special treatment and get information about the coming exam from him. I find that specially annoying since some of the teachers actually collaborate with them on cheating.

23:30 January 17, 2011 by Yendor79
This is wonderful news hands now, I'm entrusting my son still only 3yrs to the Swedish educational system. So for good or worse I have to expect a serious attitude towards him at the price of him risking expulsion if he dared to cheat.

After all good education in Sweden means it could afford him opportunities I wouldn't dream to imagine in my "European" country of origin, believe me.
08:25 January 18, 2011 by TwoToTango
Students of today are since the start encouraged to care only about points and numbers and grades. The knowledge doesn't matter, competence doesn't matter what matters is whether or not you have a VG or an MVG. To these students it is the grades that count and anything that could potentially increase them is worth it.
08:48 January 18, 2011 by dammen

I know copyright infringement and plagiarism are not the same but it is a small step if one is encouraged to step over the line in one thing then it is not so long before it rubs off on other things

One of the problems both here in Sweden and in the UK is that there is little emphasis on writing skills and how to rewrite/summarise something in your own words
10:17 January 18, 2011 by Arturio
it is sad to say but who learns to cheat at school will have a better chance in this corrupt society
09:21 January 19, 2011 by bob3000

Maybe where you come from.

There are always cases of corruption, but I do not feel Swedish society is fundamentally corrupt.

That kind of apathetic acceptance and inevitability of corruption - will get us nowhere.
16:52 January 21, 2011 by tadchem
The Pursuit of Excellence must include an active campaign against Mediocrity.
06:34 January 23, 2011 by theTRUTH4u
This is good that they actually CAUGHT someone and did something about it! Kicked them out of school was the best thing to do for those students.

Guess what they do in the US? Let it ride and slide so their parents can keep them in college and take out more loans and go more and more in debt. When do they find out that they flunked? They "graduate" with phony black square hats thinking they are some masters or doctors of something. Nothing but a foolish system and fake system.

They find out when they try to get a job. The law school "graduate" only finds out that there are no law firms that have any anymore jobs so they are lucky to get a job at McDonald's for minimum wage with their $50,000 loan with interest. Who makes the money?

The government! And guess what! They live home with their parents until they are 30 as they are FAILED students in a society that has a fake school system.

Every year the student's IQ is going down and down because they hire less and less teachers and spend less and less money on the school system. It's more important to fund wars in Iraq and spend billions of dollars to find out if there ever was water or Mars and how we should go there and spend some more billions! Sweden should be proud of though schools and kick them out and don't let them graduate with fake diplomas that prove nothing. Nothing can replace hands on experience and hard work.
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