• Sweden's news in English

Sweden warns firms of cloud computing risks

Vivian Tse · 2 Feb 2011, 14:05

Published: 02 Feb 2011 14:05 GMT+01:00

Facebook Twitter Google+ reddit

Companies, particularly those in the IT industry, that use cloud services, in which applications and files are stored with large data centres instead of on their own computers and accessed through the internet, are especially at risk.

The Swedish Fortifications Agency (Fortifikationsverket) is warning companies to take extra precautions if they rent data storage space from external providers.

"It's something we've discovered and we want people to be aware of, but it's not normally our job to look at companies' security like that. It's not really our thing to actually go through companies and see what their security levels are like," Catharina Millmarker, press secretary of the agency, told The Local on Wednesday.

"When we look at companies, like when we build new estate areas, we always check to see if the information is safe with them. We don't use those companies where it is not. We see a trend where a lot of companies do this, so we had to say something about it," she added.

The governmental authority, which is one of the largest landowners in Sweden and whose largest client is the Swedish Armed Forces (Försvarsmakten), specialises in protection technology, secure underground facilities and special purpose buildings.

"Information leaks have always been a problem since companies started to send information on the internet. It's been a problem for many years, but it will be an increased problem because of the numbers of users using cloud computing," the agency's security protection director Henrik Thernlund told The Local on Wednesday.

The agency engages in nearly 2,000 security-protected transactions each year to see how they handle the classified information that they receive.

Thernlund has observed that companies trying to procure information no longer have to hack into systems, but can simply pay for trade secrets, according to a Svenska Dagbladet (SvD) report on Wednesday.

"Company executives have no idea how poorly they manage their business-critical data. They are starry-eyed and lose business because of it," Thernlund told the newspaper.

Cloud computing began to take off two to three years ago when the bandwidth made it possible to store data online for certain applications.

The countries that are most cited in engaging in state-funded industrial espionage are Russia, China, Iran and even Britain, which has reportedly invested more resources on collecting data for economic and commercial purposes.

Other markets cited include both France and Germany, as well as India and North Korea, according to SvD.

The agency has noticed about 20 cases a year in which there is a direct threat against a Swedish company and its business-critical information. In another 50 cases, companies are exposed to "significant and serious" risks, according to the report. This pertains to both large and small companies.

Thernlund advised companies not to place all its data on cloud servers.

"No, absolutely not. For instance, if you have a new patent that you have not registered yet, it is very bad to put it on the internet. Keep it at the company before you get the patent. There are advantages with cloud computing, we're not saying ban it at all, but just for some information," he said.

As to why companies have been caught off guard, Thernlund said, "For a smaller company, it is a question of competence, they don't have the competence in-house. For a bigger company, it's cheaper than having your own server."

Story continues below…

He added that it is difficult to estimate how much companies lose from cloud computer leaks.

"The advantage for the attacker is that you don't even know if you have lost information. It's not like a book on the shelf where you see the book is missing," said Thernlund.

"Someone else can produce the product you have a patent for, or they will make an offer you were after. You cannot point to a company and say, 'You stole this from me,'" he added.

Thernlund believes that both governments and companies must become more vigilant in this area to beef up their cloud computing security. Often, it is the state that owns the databases and rents out storage space to companies.

According to security software manufacturer Symantec, all information stored on cloud servers should be encrypted, but even this is not enough to ensure that the data is secure depending on which country the cloud company's servers are located.

Vivian Tse (vivian.tse@thelocal.se)

Facebook Twitter Google+ reddit

Your comments about this article

17:04 February 2, 2011 by Arturio
I think that those who took this survey does not even know what it means cloud computing.
04:47 February 3, 2011 by NoVaseline
YEah, that's what i also thought. the person who's talking about this seems to have absolutely no idea about what Cloud Computing mean! Faann, no vaseline!
11:03 February 3, 2011 by Onepack
Fortifikationsverket: Are these the same guys who intercept our email communications and keep them for months??? These are probably the guys who are doing the snooping... Talk about hypocracy!

Cloud Computing is here to stay... and I hope that, as it progresses, the system will continue to provide all of us with valuable services.. even though we may have to put up with the likes of the snooping government. Freedom and liberty are the Cloud Computing's great gift to us all... a real threat to controling/manipulative governments!
11:28 February 3, 2011 by ausrasul
Agree with you Onepack,

but if you look at the last part of the article when the author calmed down, he says Cloud is not secured for "certian" data like unregistered patents.

I agree with that, but only on the under the condition that the company that puts the data doesn't have the competence to secure their remote access to the cloud.

for example if you upload username list as plain text telnet, then ... what are you doing?

of course ssh is better, but not like when you have your own server and secure it with a firewall and use dynamic RSA key to log in.

So it is a matter of security level, not saying cloud is bad, I'm a big fan of cloud.

do you trust your e-bank services if they secure your money with a password only?
01:19 February 4, 2011 by alecLoTh

Disclaimer: I work in IT, yes we use Cloud, I'm a programmer, I work in security...just to counteract any ideas that I'm out of my depth.....

What you are saying amounts to. "Iam going to put all my eggs in one basket, as well as the eggs of all my neighbours and friends" This way we will be more secure from someone stealing our eggs.

True, you only need to watch one basket instead of many, but if the eggs fall within the law of a country to be scanned, then your idea dosent hold water.

Technically I love the Cloud and it's possibilities...but ass a free-thinker, I call their bluff...this is simply renting people their own information

This is crazy talk.
11:46 February 4, 2011 by mikewhite
Knowing who has your data:


"There are even considerations and worries about data held on EU-hosted servers owned by US corporations. As I reported a month or so ago, at least Bob Muglia, president of servers and tools at Microsoft, was honest enough to admit that Microsoft would hand over data to the US authorities if so instructed, because they would have no choice but to comply." (John Honeyball)
23:51 September 12, 2011 by MytopCloud
Nice and useful article, and security is the main problem for Internet Cloud Computing technology.

www.mytopcloud.com domain name is for sale, for more information refer to web site or email at contact@mytopcloud.com
Today's headlines
Here's how slow Sweden's high-speed trains are getting
A Swedish SJX2000 high speed train. Photo: Tomas Oneborg/SvD/TT

The high-speed rail journey between the three biggest Swedish cities is about to get longer.

The Local List
12 Swedish words with just awesome literal translations
A filthy-minded lobster, i.e. a snuskhummer. Photo: Gorm Kallestad/NTB scanpix/TT

One of our favourite things about the Swedish language is its wonderful compound words, which range from being utterly bizarre to making perfect sense.

US election
Donald Trump won't get new Ericsson head's vote
Trump pictured at a campaign rally in Florida. Photo: Evan Vucci/AP

The new Swedish-American boss of telecoms giant Ericsson has revealed he will not vote for the Republican nominee in the forthcoming US presidential election.

Swedes named fourth most gender equal in the world
A file photo of men and women pushing prams in Stockholm. Photo: Claudio Bresciani/TT

Sweden has closed 81 percent of its overall gender gap according to the World Economic Forum.

Sweden: Russian warships in the Baltic 'worrying'
Swedish Defence Minister Peter Hultqvist. Photo: Vilhelm Stokstad/TT

Two Russian warships equipped with long-range missiles have entered the Baltic Sea after passing Denmark.

Why businesses are worried about Sweden's drone ban
A drone filming in Stockholm. Photo: Pontus Lundahl/TT

The Local investigates what Sweden's new drone ban could mean for businesses in the country.

This is the new top boss of Swedish Ericsson
Börje Ekholm. Photo: Magnus Hjalmarson Neideman/SvD/TT

Telecoms giant Ericsson has appointed a new CEO after a turbulent year for the company.

These are Sweden's best universities: ranking
A new university ranking has been released. Photo: Cecilia Larsson Lantz/Imagebank.sweden.se

At least according to this global ranking, which picks 12 Swedish universities among the top-1000.

Swedish pharmacies restrict paracetamol sales for teens
The move is intended to cut paracetamol overdoses. Photo: Nora Lorek/TT

Sweden's pharmacies are banning teens under 18 from buying more than one pack of pills at a time.

Rwandan genocide suspect held in Sweden
A memorial centre in Kigali, Rwanda. Photo: Ben Curtis/AP

A man has been arrested in Sweden suspected of involvement in the 1994 Rwandan genocide which claimed 800,000 lives.

Sponsored Article
Stockholm: creating solutions to global challenges
Sweden cuts 2016 refugee forecast
Sponsored Article
Last chance to vote absentee in the US elections
Is Game of Thrones coming to Sweden?
Property of the week: Kungsholmen, Stockholm
Blog updates

6 October

10 useful hjälpverb (The Swedish Teacher) »

"Hej! I think the so-called “hjalpverb” (auxiliary verbs in English) are a good way to get…" READ »


8 July

Editor’s blog, July 8th (The Local Sweden) »

"Hej readers, It has, as always, been a bizarre, serious and hilarious week in Sweden. You…" READ »

Sponsored Article
This is Malmö: Football capital of Sweden
Will Swedes soon be looking for fairtrade porn?
Sponsored Article
Where is the Swedish music industry heading?
The Local Voices
'I simply don’t believe in nationality'
Why we're convinced Game of Thrones is based on Sweden
People-watching: October 21st-23rd
Sponsored Article
Why you should 'grab a chair' on Stockholm's tech scene
Fury at plans that 'threaten the IB's survival' in Sweden
Sponsored Article
Swedish for programmers: 'It changed my life'
Analysis & Opinion
Are we just going to let half the country die?
Angry elk chases Swede up a lamp post
Sponsored Article
Top 7 tips to help you learn Swedish
The Local Voices
'Alienation in Sweden feels better: I find myself a stranger among scores of aliens'
Sponsored Article
‘Extremism can't be defeated on the battlefield alone’
People-watching: October 20th
The Local Voices
A layover at Qatar airport brought this Swedish-Kenyan couple together - now they're heading for marriage
Sponsored Article
Stockholm: creating solutions to global challenges
Swede punches clown that scared his grandmother
Sponsored Article
Why you should 'grab a chair' on Stockholm's tech scene
Fans throw flares and enter pitch in Swedish football riot
Sponsored Article
Where is the Swedish music industry heading?
Could Swedish blood test solve 'Making a Murderer'?
Sponsored Article
One expat's strategy for making friends in Stockholm
Swedish school to build gender neutral changing room
Sponsored Article
Nordic fashion in focus at Stockholm University
People-watching: October 14th-16th
Man in Sweden assaulted by clowns with broken bottle
Nobel Prize 2016: Literature
Watch the man who discovered Bob Dylan react to his Nobel Prize win
Record numbers emigrating from Sweden
People-watching: October 12th
The Local Voices
'Swedish startups should embrace newcomers' talents - there's nothing to fear'
How far right are the Sweden Democrats?
Property of the week: Triangeln, Malmö
The Local Voices
Syria's White Helmets: The Nobel Peace Prize would have meant a lot, but pulling a child from rubble is the greatest reward
jobs available