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Swedish man paid salary of two kronor

When salesman Rickard Dunker opened his payslip he got something of a shock. For one month's work he had been paid a total of three kronor. After tax had been deducted, his monthly income was reduced to a grand total of two kronor.

Swedish man paid salary of two kronor

Dunker’s job as a salesman for Easycare, selling First Aid products, had begun well. He threw himself into the job and travelled around Dalarna, northern Sweden, in his own car, visiting potential customers.

During the month he clocked up over 3000 kilometres (1850 miles) and paid out over 10000 kronor ($1555) in petrol. He claims he sold over 20,000 kronor’s worth of products for the company. For all this work, he was rewarded with a paltry two kronor, after tax.

“I couldn’t imagine that such a thing was possible,” he told a reporter at the newspaper Dala-Demokraten.

According to his ex-employers, he travelled too far and made too few sales. Something which they claim is quite clear in his contract. Lars Andersson, head of Easycare in Borlänge thinks he is a bad salesman.

“It’s a tough branch. If he thinks he’s been cheated we should take it up in court. There’s nothing wrong with the contract which he agreed to and signed.” Andersson told a reporter at Dala-Demokraten

Dunker is no longer working for the company and wants to warn others to go through their contracts with a fine toothcomb.

He has not commented as to what he plans to spend his two kronor wages on.

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WAGES

This is how much Swedish salaries increased in 2018

New figures released by Sweden’s National Mediation Institute (Medlingsinstitutet) on Wednesday showed that salaries increased at a faster rate last year than they did the year before.

This is how much Swedish salaries increased in 2018
File photo: Fredrik Sandberg/TT
Across Sweden, salaries increased by an average 2.6 percent during the first eleven months of 2018, representing a modest increase over the 2.3 percent growth seen in 2017. 
 
Public sector wages grew by 3.0 percent in November 2018, while the private sector increase was a more modest 2.4 percent. 
 
“The boom in the Swedish economy and the strong demand for labour have not had significant impacts on the rate of wage increase in the economy as a whole,” Medlingsinstitutet economist Valter Hultén said in a press release
 
“At the same time, demand for labour is very high in the public sector and this can be a contributing factor to the wage increases being somewhat higher there than in the business sector,” he continued. 
 
Although Sweden’s unemployment rate recently reached its lowest figure in ten years, there are signs that the labour market is beginning to cool.
 
Earlier this week, two redundancy support organizations said that they expected to see a significant increase in people needing their services in 2019 and in what could be considered a bad omen, Sweden’s job agency warned on Wednesday that it will let eliminate upwards of a third of its workers nationwide in a move that is expected to significantly impact job-seekers. 
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