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More Swedes having three kids: study

TT/Rebecca Martin · 23 Jun 2011, 10:25

Published: 23 Jun 2011 10:25 GMT+02:00

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The trend, which has been pointing upward since the 1990’s, came as a surprise to the demographers behind the study.

“We were expecting a dip in third-child births considering Swedish women are choosing to wait longer before they have their first baby,” Lotta Persson of SCB told news agency TT.

Today, the average age for a Swedish women to have her first baby is 29 and demographers therefore believed that this would mean an insufficient amount of fertile years to have a third child.

According to the study, many families had a third child in the beginning of the 1990’s, but the subsequent financial crisis led to a break in the trend toward the end of the decade.

The SCB demographers believe that the latest credit crunch may have a similar effect on the current trend.

“There was no increase between 2008 and 2009 and that could have been an effect of the financial crisis,” Persson told TT.

Factors that influence the choice seem to be education level, income, country of origin and neighbourhood demographics. But if one has a greater influence than the others is difficult to say, according to Persson.

“It is difficult to grade them as they can influence each other as well. Income certainly matters. It is those that have the highest income that are more likely to have kids, but also those with the lowest income, “ Persson told TT.

Level of education generally affects income and it’s therefore common that people with a high level of secondary education have more than two children. But it is also quite usual among those with a low level of secondary education.

New Swedes tend to have a third child, and people living in larger cities or in areas where many families with children reside, are more likely want more than two children.

However, sometimes even those who live in areas with few children have an increased tendency to have a third child. This particularly applies to mothers of two children who live in owner-occupied apartments (bostadsrätter) in metropolitan areas.

Story continues below…

The trend could mean that SCB will have to revise their predictions on the fertility figure of Swedish women.

The fertility figure, which is a measure of how many children women have on average, is set at 2 per woman. Demographers had predicted that this figure would drop to 1.8 over a number of years.

But according to Persson, this figure might now have to be revised.

TT/Rebecca Martin (news@thelocal.se)

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Your comments about this article

12:22 June 23, 2011 by canuk
hahahah, i was thinking the same thing, in malmö a lot of 'new swedes' like to have 5 or 6 kids a piece.....
12:32 June 23, 2011 by Elias06
its amazing THELOCAL may publish an article about SWEDES POOPING more than once a day, you can be sure to read sick comments from sick people puting it on foreigners are you guys paid for making these comments ?
12:55 June 23, 2011 by DavidtheNorseman
@Elias06 - the article is clear that the "country of origin" is a major factor. It would be interesting to see how the numbers split between ethnic Swedes and each of the other ethnic groups. I prophecy that while some groups like the ethnic Swedes and ethnic Chinese will be less than 2 children on average, the averages for ethnic Middle Easterners (or West Asianers if you want to use the Chinese designation) will be greater than 2....no suprises as these things (the number of children you have) are directly related to lifestyle and beliefs. Neighbourhood demographics is so tightly related to country of origin that it's a red herring .... LOL

What would really be interesting is if those folks have been using sex selection techniques to have only (or a significant majority of) boys.....

Traditionally in the West immigrant families who integrate lower birthrates to the level of the local country in a couple of generations. I don't know what the pattern will be with conclaves.
13:27 June 23, 2011 by engagebrain
an average of around 2.2 children maintains a stable population - the human population is enormous already, perhaps the government could discourage large families.
14:21 June 23, 2011 by helveeta
I think any family having more than 2 children is just selfish. The world has too many people and will run out of resources for future generations sooner than we think. Also, gotta say, there are two children in my son's dagis of middle eastern descent and they both have about 6-7 siblings each. Native Swedes are not the ones increasing the size of their families it's safe to say.
16:01 June 23, 2011 by wenddiver
Too easy, just too easy to comment on.
16:24 June 23, 2011 by TheOneWhoTravels
Why does the headline call them "Swedes" when the text of the article itself talks about the "country of origin" of some of the people in the study being other than Sweden? If their "country of origin" is not Sweden, then they're not "Swedes"!

17:08 June 23, 2011 by calebian22
"New Swedes tend to have a third child"

The article is pretty clear about who is popping out puppies.
18:41 June 23, 2011 by Iraniboy
If I choose to have any children I would like to have maximum one but I think one should be very sick to even feel bad about number of children of other races.
21:03 June 23, 2011 by calebian22

In western,developed countries the average for children is generally under 2 to around 2. You can use your imagination to discover which New Swedes tend to have 3 puppies or more.
01:59 June 24, 2011 by Smiling Canuk
These statistics are being skewed by the 3rd world arrivals. Talk about giving the ranch.
04:36 June 24, 2011 by ericrufinosiah
I am a foreigner and certainly,it's encouraging news that the natives Swedish are

having more children now and I do hope that the Government of the day should

provide and give more incentives to natives Swedish who are having more than

two children now.
19:27 June 25, 2011 by Pro-alliance
The thing is without more women the Swedish winter would have been even much darker than it has been for centuries. So the birth of more women is necessary to brighten up Sweden.
09:27 July 9, 2011 by Maggie Malay
I think an increase from two, to three, children is not numerically significant - OK I know it represents a 50% increase percentage wise, but its not anything major.

In almost any country in the world you can get short-term increases in the birth-rate, but this reverts to a lower birth rate, a year, two years (etc) later.

Its the long-term trend which is important - and I'm not sure this article has demonstrated that is what is happening
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